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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1997 | By Bing J. Mark, FOR THE INQUIRER
From the Volumes of Imaginary Hours is Steve Krieckhaus' latest dance - a highly allusive, fragile, "dark rhapsody" from Philadelphia's most consistently brilliant solo choreographer. For two performances over the weekend, the Susan Hess Studio was changed into a low-tech black box theater with heavy plastic tarps. Krieckhaus, who says he likes "transforming" spaces, wove richly colored slides, calibrated movement, and sleight of hand into a suggestive lattice for the mind's eye. In one section ("Tissues of a Man")
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
While the world continues debating the merits of Rachmaninoff's symphonies and concertos, you have to acknowledge the basic function the music serves over the decades of fluctuating fashion: It saves concerts. So it was yesterday, when British pianist Stephen Hough and guest conductor Osmo V?nsk? played the Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini on a Philadelphia Orchestra program that wouldn't normally need saving, but did when two Finnish works revealed some unexpected fragility. An unlikely virtuoso, pianist Hough might seem too analytical to summon Rachmaninoff-ian heat.
NEWS
March 27, 2002 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The cutting-edge music world is supposed to be above niceties such as theatricality. Experimentation means going to your outer musical limits - damn the consequences - and then consolidating the best of the advances into later, bigger pieces. What a pleasure it is, then, when Rhapsody for Marimba by Japanese composer Takayoshi Yoshioka did both at the same time, as heard on the Rel?che Ensemble's spring program, titled "Hi-Octane Modernism Dreams Ancient Folk Song. " You could have sat there Sunday at the Philadelphia Ethical Society feeling guilty for having so much fun as the charismatic Israeli marimba player Chen Zimbalista splashed his way through Yoshioka's unabashed vehicle, which emphasizes musical content over technical display.
NEWS
December 31, 2015 | Daily News Staff
The Mummers Parade may be a Philly tradition that dates to 1901, but that doesn't mean you should expect the same old same old in 2016 — or any year. There's always something new, from the music to the routines and costumes. Last year, even the route was different, as the parade marched down (not up) Broad Street. That directional change continues this year. New for 2016 and stepping off in lead position at 9 a.m. New Year's Day is the Philadelphia Division, a response to criticism that the parade lacked diversity.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Julian Scanlan, a.k.a. DJ Swoon, is too young to go clubbing - unless he brings his party tunes. The Mount Laurel resident, 17, is a rising Electronic Dance Music (EDM) artist. His composing, remixing, producing, and performing skills have landed him DJ gigs in Philly and Orlando, as well as residencies last year and again this week at Grammy Camp. "Camp is amazing," says Scanlan, who's attending the Grammy Foundation's competitive summer workshop program in Manhattan until Sunday.
NEWS
January 10, 2016
At 1 p.m. Sunday on WRTI-FM (90.1), the Philadelphia Orchestra broadcast is George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue - the original jazz band version, Ferde Grofe's faithful orchestration of Paul Whiteman's arrangement - with guest conductor Marin Alsop and pianist Jon Kimura Parker.
NEWS
February 5, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The recent name-calling between the United States and Japan provides a timely setting for "Rhapsody in August," billed as the movie in which Richard Gere apologizes on behalf of America for the A-bomb obliteration of Nagasaki. In some quarters, the movie has been labeled as another move by Japan to rewrite history, downplaying its own wartime behavior while casting that of the United States in a harsh light. The ruckus surrounding "Rhapsody in August" would lead you to believe that this movie, the work of noted Japanese director Akira Kurosawa, is explosive and angry.
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Hyperactive and behaviorally challenged, George Gershwin probably had some form of attention deficit disorder. He grew up in a music-starved environment. His family moved 28 times before he turned 17. And somehow Gershwin fell in love with music and was able to convert the sounds of a train he took from New York to Boston into one of the most beloved symphonies of all time, Rhapsody in Blue. These are some of the points made by Richard Kogan, 58, a professor of clinical psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College and artistic director of the Weill Cornell Music and Medicine Program.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2004 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In a sense, Seth Rudetsky's one-man show, Rhapsody in Seth, is a different form of dinner theater. The main course of the evening is a dish of revenge. The often hilarious performance, which mingles music with flashing wit and rueful reminiscence, surveys the wrongs of passage Rudetsky endured growing up gay and Jewish on Long Island and facing the awful truth that he still had to go to high school. The abuse he suffered took many forms, and Rhapsody in Seth, in which names are named - including hostile teachers, harassing students, and oblivious family members - is Rudetsky's payback.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 14, 2016
1 p.m. Sunday on WRTI-FM (90.1): Dazzling Macedonian pianist Simon Trpceski will perform Rachmaninoff's Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini , as Gianandrea Noseda conducts the Philadelphia Orchestra, as well as the overture to Rossini's opera La Gazza Ladra and the U.S. premiere of Symphony No. 2 by Alfredo Casella.
NEWS
December 31, 2015 | Daily News Staff
The Mummers Parade may be a Philly tradition that dates to 1901, but that doesn't mean you should expect the same old same old in 2016 — or any year. There's always something new, from the music to the routines and costumes. Last year, even the route was different, as the parade marched down (not up) Broad Street. That directional change continues this year. New for 2016 and stepping off in lead position at 9 a.m. New Year's Day is the Philadelphia Division, a response to criticism that the parade lacked diversity.
NEWS
November 1, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Rebellion - cheerful, languid, or seething - was the underlying theme of Marin Alsop's guest-conducting engagement with the Philadelphia Orchestra in ways that skirted some of the more inciting possibilities, but that arrived with blinding clarity in Shostakovich's Symphony No. 5 . The added subtle twist Thursday at the Kimmel Center was how this Russian music turned a mirror back on American listeners. Written to placate the über-populist Soviet authorities, the symphony displayed meticulous logic, suitable bombast, and common touches, but with many subversive undertones.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gone is the sprawling complex of buildings where the recording industry took root and made history in downtown Camden more than a century ago. The lone reminder of the city's crucial role in the early music business is the Victor apartment building with its iconic Nipper tower and stained-glass images of the dog listening to "his master's voice. " Phonograph recordings by the Victor Talking Machine Co. once captured the voice of opera singer Enrico Caruso and performances by classical musicians such as Sergei Rachmaninoff and orchestras conducted by Leopold Stokowski and Arturo Toscanini.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Julian Scanlan, a.k.a. DJ Swoon, is too young to go clubbing - unless he brings his party tunes. The Mount Laurel resident, 17, is a rising Electronic Dance Music (EDM) artist. His composing, remixing, producing, and performing skills have landed him DJ gigs in Philly and Orlando, as well as residencies last year and again this week at Grammy Camp. "Camp is amazing," says Scanlan, who's attending the Grammy Foundation's competitive summer workshop program in Manhattan until Sunday.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
BUILDERS USED to "wow" sample-house visitors with in-wall intercoms that could also simulcast a radio station to send music throughout the house. Seemed sexy at the time, though the sound was always tinny. Today, a growing slew of wireless multiroom audio products achieve the same, music-everywhere effect with far easier installation, radically better sound and an insane variety of music options. All you gotta do is plug a device into a power outlet (some run on batteries), link it via WiFi to your Internet service, then control the play with an app on your smart phone, tablet or computer.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
T-Mobile has trumpeted itself since last year as "the uncarrier" - fourth place in customers, but first among anyone who hates the big guys' "gotcha" practices, such as long-term contracts or tricky data-roaming charges that can cost people thousands of dollars when they venture overseas. Now, T-Mobile is challenging Verizon and AT&T on two more counts. It is eliminating data charges for music streamed via services such as Pandora, Spotify, and Rhapsody. And, starting Monday, in league with Apple, it will offer anyone who wants to test its network a seven-day free trial on a loaner iPhone 5S. All you need is a credit card.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
SOME SAY it with flowers, candy or heart-shaped jewelry. If Gizmo Guy was looking for a last-minute Valentine's Day present, I'd go with a $10-a-month gift-card (at Target) subscription to Beats Music, the brand-new streaming-music service that lets you profess your love 20 million ways. And keeps pushing the passion to your mobile phone, tablet, computer or Sonos music-streaming system - with customized music selections befitting your tastes and events of the day. Today, you'll find the "Highlights" section of the Beats Music app packed with romantic bon bons, including love-tune playlists curated by the likes of Demi Lovato and Ellen DeGeneres.
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Hyperactive and behaviorally challenged, George Gershwin probably had some form of attention deficit disorder. He grew up in a music-starved environment. His family moved 28 times before he turned 17. And somehow Gershwin fell in love with music and was able to convert the sounds of a train he took from New York to Boston into one of the most beloved symphonies of all time, Rhapsody in Blue. These are some of the points made by Richard Kogan, 58, a professor of clinical psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College and artistic director of the Weill Cornell Music and Medicine Program.
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