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Rheumatoid Arthritis

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NEWS
July 27, 1991 | By Eddie Olsen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his final days, rheumatoid arthritis had crippled most of his joints. He lived in constant pain. His hands were gnarled and his body had withered. But, John Coward - onetime war hero, rowing champion and business executive - was a man of courage with an unending sense of humor. He was an inspiration to others until the end. For Mr. Coward, a 67-year-old resident of Marlton, the end came Tuesday at West Jersey Hospital-Voorhees, where he died in his sleep. "The man was a joy to be around, and everyone admired his courage," said Wendy McBrair, arthritis clinical specialist at West Jersey Hospital.
FOOD
December 18, 1994 | By Edward Blonz, FOR THE INQUIRER
Rheumatoid arthritis sufferers may experience some improvement by adopting a vegetarian diet, according to a new study in the British Journal of Nutrition. The 13-month study of 44 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis found that those on vegetarian regimens experienced fewer arthritis symptoms than the volunteers whose diet contained meat and other animal products. This latest research joins a long list of studies showing that health statistics for vegetarians include lower rates of heart disease, obesity, obesity-related diabetes, colon cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, hypertension, osteoporosis, kidney stones, gallstones, and diverticular disease.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2011 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - Drugmaker Merck & Co. Inc. will pay $950 million to resolve investigations into its marketing of the painkiller Vioxx, the Justice Department said Tuesday. The agency said Merck, which has major operations in the Philadelphia region, would pay $321.6 million in criminal fines and $628.4 million as a civil settlement agreement. It also will plead guilty to a misdemeanor charge that it marketed Vioxx as a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis before getting Food and Drug Administration approval.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1992 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The stock price of Greenwich Pharmaceuticals Inc. tumbled yesterday after Wall Street learned that the Fort Washington drug firm must provide further analysis of a key study for its potential arthritis medicine. The stock plunged by $3.625 a share to $7.50 in over-the-counter trading after the firm disclosed that the Food and Drug Administration late last week asked for more information about the most recent results on Greenwich's drug, Therafectin. The medicine, which has been designed to treat rheumatoid arthritis, would be Greenwich's first product if it ultimately won marketing approval from the agency.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2009 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. signed a deal yesterday to develop drugs to treat rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. The agreement to work with Chroma Therapeutics Ltd. of Oxford, England, to develop new products represents Glaxo's latest effort to overhaul its research and development programs so it more closely resembles a small, nimble biotechnology company rather than a lumbering pharmaceutical giant. Glaxo is based in London but has large operations in the Philadelphia area.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Protalex Inc., a New Hope biotechnology company, said yesterday that it has raised $15.2 million in a private placement of 6.1 million shares of common stock at $2.50 a share. The publicly held company said it would use the proceeds for product development and clinical trials. Protalex is working on a new class of drug for treating rheumatoid arthritis and other immune-system disorders. In January, the company raised $5.8 million in a private placement of 2.59 million shares of stock at $2.25 a share.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
MAYBE it's due to our already long summer of diarrhea jokes, but I developed a soft spot for the clunky bookishness of "Words and Pictures. " This is an inspirational teacher movie in the Mr. Chips/Mr. Holland vein, which doubles down on the inspirational teachers - an English teacher (Clive Owen) and an art teacher (Juliette Binoche) lead a student-body debate on the relative merits of writing and painting. It's also a love story - Jack (Owen) is a blocked writer and an alcoholic, Dina (Binoche)
BUSINESS
November 16, 2005 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Centocor Inc. said yesterday that preliminary results from a study of its experimental rheumatoid arthritis treatment found the compound worked to reduce joint pain and inflammation. The drug, CNTO-148, is a human monoclonal antibody being developed by the Horsham biotechnology company as a successor to Remicade, which is approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis and nine other inflammatory conditions. Remicade had sales of $2.12 billion last year. A human monoclonal antibody is derived from a human protein, as opposed to an animal protein.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1994 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A small Fort Washington drug firm, already fighting for survival, got more bad news over the weekend when one of its potential products failed to demonstrate that it is effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis. Greenwich Pharmaceuticals Inc. said yesterday that the drug compound - known as GW-80126 - did not perform much better than a placebo when tested in 325 patients. Symptoms improved in 52 percent of the patients who took the compound, compared with 50 percent of the patients who used the placebo.
NEWS
October 22, 2010
Rosemarie F. Boyle, 74, formerly of Narberth, a medical school administrator and rehabilitation specialist who helped disabled people while coping with her own rheumatoid arthritis, died of complications from the disease Saturday, Sept. 25, at Simpson House in Wynnefield. A native of Bethlehem, Pa., Ms. Boyle earned a bachelor's degree from Moravian College. Her rheumatoid arthritis was diagnosed when she was 21. Despite the progressively crippling condition, she taught at Upper Darby Junior High School for several years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2016 | By Kimberly Garrison
It's a fact that physically active individuals tend to be healthier, happier, and live longer than those who are inactive and not fit. Though this is overwhelmingly true for most people, it is especially true for people suffering from inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis. Yes, you read that right. It may sound counterintuitive, but exercise is one of the best things you can do for yourself if you have arthritis. Sure, exercising is likely the last thing you want to do when you are fatigued and your joints ache, but it can help manage pain and improve your energy.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Lucy E. Hornstein, M.D., For The Inquirer
He was a big guy, nearly 300 pounds, so when his left ankle began hurting, the first thing he thought was how much he was asking of it. He'd had a similar pain in his other ankle in the past, even though he swore he hadn't tripped, fallen, twisted, or hurt either one. An orthopedist had sent him to physical therapy the first time, but that only made it much worse. The pain was so severe any movement of the joint was agony, never mind trying to walk on it. Eventually, the pain went away, but now it was his left ankle, which had begun hurting two days ago and was getting worse.
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By John Stern, M.D., For The Inquirer
The patient, a 60-year-old woman, had been battling rheumatoid arthritis for more than a decade. Most of her large joints had been seriously damaged. Both hips, one knee, and a shoulder had been replaced. She took a wide array of medicines, including steroids, but they had failed to stop the illness from progressing. She lacked the strength and dexterity to open a ketchup bottle, and needed family help to complete even small kitchen tasks. Her doctor recommended that she try a new drug known as a "tumor necrosis factor inhibitor," one of the newer "biologics.
NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
For some of the most common drugs in U.S. medicine cabinets, the time of day they are taken can determine how well they work. That is the conclusion of University of Pennsylvania scientists, who based their finding on an exhaustive, hour-by-hour analysis of the internal protein-generating machinery in mice. Of the nearly 20,000 mouse genes known to contain recipes for making proteins, 43 percent were found to have a clocklike, "circadian" quality, revving up or slowing down their activity level at specific times every day. Almost all of these genes have close equivalents in humans.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
MAYBE it's due to our already long summer of diarrhea jokes, but I developed a soft spot for the clunky bookishness of "Words and Pictures. " This is an inspirational teacher movie in the Mr. Chips/Mr. Holland vein, which doubles down on the inspirational teachers - an English teacher (Clive Owen) and an art teacher (Juliette Binoche) lead a student-body debate on the relative merits of writing and painting. It's also a love story - Jack (Owen) is a blocked writer and an alcoholic, Dina (Binoche)
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Henry C. McGettigan's mother died when he was 9, he would spend some of his summer days with his maternal grandmother in North Philadelphia. "She would pack a lunch for him" and send him off to Shibe Park at 21st Street and Lehigh Avenue, the home of both the Athletics and the Phillies, daughter Theresa Miller said in a phone interview. "He would go and sit outside and listen to the game," through the roars of the crowds, in the days before portable radios, because he didn't have enough money to buy a ticket.
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
WHEN SHE WAS admitted to Immaculate Mary Home two weeks ago, Betty Tyre cried in despair to Deacon Steve Guckin, a member of the pastoral care team. Tyre had been hospitalized so often in 2013, she'd barely slept in her own bed. Rheumatoid arthritis had crippled her so badly, she was in a wheelchair and needed rehab at Immaculate Mary, a Catholic nursing home in Mayfair, before she could return home to Port Richmond. "I feel like I'll never get better," Tyre, 69, told Guckin.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Big pharmaceutical companies strike licensing deals with small companies in hopes of finding new, highly profitable medicine without the cost of buying a whole company. Small companies get funding other ways, such as venture capital firms, but the money from licensing arrangements can mean the difference between continuing operations and closing shop. Sometimes these deals work, sometimes not. Last week presented four examples, three starting and one ending (badly), involving the drugmakers GlaxoSmithKline, Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer, and AstraZeneca, all of which have significant Philadelphia-area operations.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | BY ALI WATKINS, Daily News Staff Writer watkina@phillynews.com, 215-854-5905
JUANITA UPSHUR, 70, doesn't live in an igloo. But for a week in January, the West Mount Airy resident felt as if she did. "It's ice-cold," she said at the time. "You need a coat if you want to go visit somebody in another apartment. " Dorothy Henry, 70, and her husband, Norman, 72, were without heat for three weeks in February. A broken furnace and disagreements with contractors took their toll on the Overbrook Park couple, who said the cold amplified their health problems. Upshur and the Henrys are among dozens of Philadelphia seniors who, according to authorities, have struggled with a lack of heat during some frigid days this winter.
NEWS
November 7, 2012
LOS ANGELES - Want a clue to your risk of heart disease? Look in the mirror. People who look old have a greater chance of developing heart disease than younger-looking people the same age do, new research suggests. Doctors say the study, presented at an American Heart Association conference, highlights the difference between biological and chronological age. Those with three to four of the aging signs - receding hairline at the temples, baldness at the crown of the head, earlobe creases or yellowish fatty deposits around the eyelids - had a 57 percent greater risk for heart attack and a 39 percent greater risk for heart disease compared to people with none of these signs.
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