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Ribbon

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NEWS
April 16, 1989 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
For 27 months, a bright yellow ribbon hung on a White House door, a highly visible symbol of the U.S. government's determination to free the American hostages held in Lebanon. Then, on the day George Bush became president, it vanished. White House officials have refused to say what happened to it. But some acknowledge that they wanted it removed because it symbolized more than the continued captivity of the hostages: It was a politically painful symbol of the government's failure to win their release more than four years after the first American was abducted.
NEWS
July 17, 1992 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Welcome back, Ed. Returning from the madness of the Democratic convention for a pleasant ribbon-cutting at City Hall yesterday, Mayor Rendell found his words drowned out by angry union members and senior citizens chanting slogans. Rendell was supposed to give a little speech and cut a ribbon opening the Politico Cafe, a brand new sidewalk restaurant on the apron of City Hall. But it was soon apparent there would be no speeches. As Rendell and his aides wandered among the umbrellas and potted plants of the cafe, the air was filled with chanting so loud it drowned out all conversation.
NEWS
June 15, 1992 | BY JOSEPH McALLISTER
As a Philadelphia police officer with 22 years of service, I was disgusted with acting Commissioner Thomas Seamon's decision to let officer Leslie Seymore cover her badge with the black mourning ribbon. It is a slap in the face of every officer who died in the line of duty. It shows lack of respect for their families. Commissioner Seamon stated that since we wore a black ribbon to honor the former mayor of our city, Frank Rizzo, it was justifiable for Officer Seymore to wear the ribbon in order to honor Rodney King.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | By Richard Kleiman, Special to The Inquirer
Anna Scandaliato said she turned to Ben Gay cream after spending hour upon hour operating a manual T-shirt printing press over the last two weeks. "My fingers were so swollen I couldn't move them," Scandaliato said. Why? Because the small Chester County company she works for hit pay dirt. Scandaliato is one of only eight regular employees at Horsin' Around, a tiny custom imprinting company in West Chester. At 6 p.m. on Feb. 4 - a quiet Monday evening - the yellow-ribbon sweat shirt that Scandaliato has, by now, seen too many of took off. Horsin' Around owners Alfred Rasch and Carol Boerer watched as the number at the bottom, right-hand corner of their television screen got bigger and bigger.
NEWS
December 31, 2001 | By Lauren Rile Smith
The girl hugs herself; the wind goes through her. Twenty feet away a boy peels an orange and eats it slowly. The light changes and a torrent of women in candy-colored exercise clothing crosses the street. The poles are strung with power snowflakes. On this corner a man asks her for eighty cents. His eyes narrow at her boots, her yellow jacket. She wants to run into the street, or scream, or start to sing, softly at first but rising in volume.
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | By Ellen O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of officials gathered under a bright, cold sky at the edge of the Delaware River in Camden yesterday, with a big white tent, a big red ribbon and a bulldozer. First they made speeches inside the tent. Then they followed the governor of New Jersey outside and cheered when he cut the ribbon. Then they got out of the way of the bulldozer. Thus went groundbreaking, and thus, almost immediately, began site-clearing for the $42 million New Jersey State Aquarium that those same officials hope will become the centerpiece for an extensive development on the state's Delaware coastline.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although Fred Bland Jr. was in bed long before Friday night's broadcast of the running events at the Olympic Games, he had already watched plenty of the competition. So he knew what to do yesterday when it came time for his own Olympic trials. In tiny, high-top sneakers, he raced through the 25-yard dash as though dessert waited at the finish line. Bland, 4, was one of about 80 youngsters who participated in the Preschool Olympics sponsored by the YMCA of Gloucester County on Redbank Avenue in Woodbury.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | By Ward Allebach, Special to The Inquirer
The "green ribbon" through the heart of Lower Gwynedd Township hasn't really been the issue in and out of court for the last three years. The issue has been whether the Board of Supervisors went about getting it legally. Later this year, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court will hear arguments in Gwynedd Properties Inc. v. Lower Gwynedd Township, a dispute over the township's 1987 condemnation of the 77-acre Penllyn Woods. The parcel is the missing link in the township's attempt to preserve open space along the banks of the Wissahickon Creek.
NEWS
December 17, 2001 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The hoi polloi replaced haut monde yesterday at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, and feel-good Philadelphia fever reached new heights. For the first time in the $265 million center's three-day history, the public was invited to share the spotlight during a daylong ceremony that included a variety of performances. Thousands eagerly responded, looking skyward in awe as they streamed through the doors into the grand atrium. Perhaps it was the opportunity to eschew the $5,000 ticket required for the first two nights, or maybe it was the chance to experience the glitterati who brought the hall to life, but many spectators said that attending the ribbon-cutting festivities was mandatory.
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | By Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One evening last fall, an Abington Township mother looked into her baby daughter's canopy crib and discovered a parent's nightmare. Nine-month-old Lindsay Jean Iannarone lay still, not breathing, with an 18- inch length of cloth ribbon wrapped around her neck. She had accidentally strangled, an autopsy concluded. The tie-back ribbon that caused the infant's death was part of a lace drapery set that the mother had bought the previous summer to decorate the crib. Last week in Montgomery County Court, Lynn Iannarone of Jenkintown filed a civil suit seeking damages for the Sept.
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NEWS
October 18, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following years of drama, litigation, and scandal, the ribbon was officially cut Thursday on the new $122.3 million Family Court building at 15th and Arch Streets. Speakers included a who's who among Philadelphia and state court officials, many of whom were inside the marble-laden lobby for the first time, including former Gov. Ed Rendell; Kevin M. Dougherty, administrative judge; and Ronald D. Castille, chief justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. "What they get will be equal to what they see here," Castille said.
NEWS
October 2, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five area schools scored a prestigious National Blue Ribbon, including a city school that won for the second time, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan announced Tuesday. Franklin Towne Charter High School, Norwood-Fontbonne Academy, and Hill-Freedman World Academy, all in Philadelphia, won the award given by the Department of Education. So did Merion Elementary School in Lower Merion and Mount St. Joseph Academy in Flourtown. The award has special meaning for Hill-Freedman, a Philadelphia School District magnet school that has long educated middle schoolers and is expanding to become a high school as well.
NEWS
December 20, 2013
ONE THOUSAND years from this Monday, people around the world will celebrate Festivus by airing their grievances, displaying feats of strength and praising the miracle of a towering pole made of beer cans. That's the way the rituals of mankind evolve, isn't it? From a simple act - a child born in a manger - to the sacred. It's been 16 years since the writers of the sitcom "Seinfeld" first alerted us to the wonders of Festivus, the goofy secular solstice festival "for the rest of us. " A mere blink of the eye in terms of humankind.
NEWS
September 28, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
MALVERN With a DJ in the gym, and an inflatable slide in the parking lot, St. Patrick School looked like a carnival Thursday. And instead of their everyday green uniforms, the pupils were dressed in blue. St. Patrick School was named one of the 2013 National Blue Ribbon Schools, an honor bestowed on 50 private and 236 public schools in the country. And that called for a blue palooza. Principal Patricia O'Donnell said the school in Malvern had been notified by the Department of Education over the summer that it might win the award, and she made sure it was ready to celebrate.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Speaking publicly for the first time since they lost their daughter, Anne, in the Market Street building collapse in June, city Treasurer Nancy Winkler and her husband, John Bryan, called Tuesday for the city to convene a panel of nationally recognized experts to conduct a top-to-bottom review of the Department of Licenses and Inspections. "We believe an independent blue-ribbon panel of national safety experts . . . should look at what happened and fully evaluate what system should be in place . . . so that in the future, citizens of the city of Philadelphia can feel confident, when they walk the streets and enter buildings, that they will be safe," Winkler told reporters.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The organic-foods industry is no longer going gangbusters, as it did before the U.S. economy collapsed five years ago. But despite the slowdown, Albert's Organics Inc., a national distributor of produce and other perishables based in Logan Township, still outgrew its distribution center there in the last couple of years. The organic and natural-foods market is "still growing in the strong single to double digits. People are continuing to want to eat healthier," Albert's president Scott Dennis said Wednesday at a ribbon-cutting for a 70,000-square-foot distribution center and headquarters at the Gloucester County site.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Margaritaville, the sprawling Jimmy Buffett-inspired dining and entertainment complex at Resorts Casino, was unveiled Thursday, with Gov. Christie cutting the ribbon. "This place is an example of the fun and entertainment that Atlantic City can be all about," said the Republican governor, who was introduced by Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority chief executive officer Mitchell Etess. The authority became co-owner of Resorts with majority owner Morris Bailey last year, and the 40,000-square-foot Margaritaville project was among the first announced by the partnership.
NEWS
May 20, 2013
SOME DOGS need their space. That's the message of TheYellowDogProject.com , which is raising awareness of the meaning of a yellow ribbon on a dog's leash. The ribbons mean that a dog may be fearful, aggressive or even too fragile to be pounced on by friendly people or dogs. Sometimes the situation is temporary and the dog is being rehabilitated, either physically or mentally. But sometimes the Yellow Ribbon status is permanent. The website says that the concept is based on putting a ribbon on a horse's tail, to indicate an animal who may kick.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
  BRIDGEWATER, N.J. - Jobs - keeping them, finding the right people for them, and which presidential candidate will generate more of them - is among the nation's biggest issues right now. The drugmaker most famous for Botox, Allergan Inc., cut the ribbon on a new facility here last week, and many pieces of the employment puzzle and debate were on display. Allergan's headquarters is in Irvine, Calif., only six sunny miles from the Pacific Ocean, but it came east to expand because of the talent in this region.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Five years ago, as soon as her breast-cancer treatment ended, Mindy Cohen put on the pink. She e-mailed everyone she knew, asking whether they'd walk in her name at the annual Race for the Cure. By that first race day, Team Mindy was already a juggernaut. About 120 people marched by her side to raise money for the cause - so many that they won an award from the race organizer, the Susan G. Komen Foundation, for assembling the largest entrant in the event's friends and family division.
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