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Riccardo Muti

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NEWS
July 15, 1988 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
"There's Norman Carol - he's got what I've got in my shoulder: tendinitis," the woman remarked. "Isn't it good to see him! He hasn't been here for a while. "Muti will be out soon. Oh - a white suit this time. Look at that fit!" Welcome to the bleachers at the Mann Music Center, which are designed to separate the masses from the paying elite. The woman who was introducing her brother to the Philadelphia Orchestra's concertmaster certainly wasn't a plebe. She spoke quietly before the music began, talking proudly of concertmaster Carol as though he were a friend.
NEWS
May 2, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Long Goodbye for Riccardo Muti, which began with his gala and nationally televised concert April 22, continues this weekend as the Philadelphia Orchestra performs its last set of subscription concerts with its music director. Characteristic of the maestro who abhors equating the arts with entertainment, his final program, heard last night at the Academy of Music, is a lovely and serious one. It represents well the values he has insisted on and inspired during his tenure. Who else would choose Rossini's sorrowful Stabat Mater and Cherubini's sole and unfamiliar Symphony in D Major as farewell music?
NEWS
November 11, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra's programs sometimes sound like the breathless messages from an old friend with so much to tell and so little time to say it. There is scant time and place to present everything worthy of performing - the new, the old, the neglected, the music hidden behind some nationalistic curtain. Riccardo Muti led one of those breathless programs yesterday at the Academy of Music. There was a premiere; there was a Tchaikovsky piece that had dropped from sight and was being rediscovered; there was a 20th-century masterpiece more discussed than played, and there was a new young piano soloist looking to find her place in this musical tumult.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia gave a rousing, festive and occasionally sentimental sendoff to Riccardo Muti last night, at once celebrating his 20-year association with the Philadelphia Orchestra and regretting his departure as its music director. Muti, however, may have felt like a man required to bake his own birthday cake. The maestro conducted his own farewell concert, held in the Academy of Music before a capacity audience that showered the conductor with ovation after ovation. The celebration began at 6 in the 12th-floor conservatory of the Hotel Atop the Bellevue, as 400 orchestra patrons (those who have made $500 in contributions to an education fund in Muti's name)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
FORMER Philadelphia Orchestra conductor Riccardo Muti yesterday was awarded the $1 million Birgit Nilsson Prize for his "extraordinary" contributions and influence in the world of music. Muti, conductor of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra , has also been conductor of the Maggio Musicale Fiorentino , the Philharmonia Orchestra in London and Teatro alla Scala . "Maestro Muti is being recognized for his extraordinary contributions in opera and concert, as well as his enormou s influence in the music world both on and off the stage," the jury said in the citation.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
CONDUCTOR Riccardo Muti 's official website says the conductor has undergone hip surgery in Italy following an accident. The website said yesterday that as a result the music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra , and former director of the Philadelphia Orchestra , cannot conduct concerts planned this month in Chicago. It said the accident was not serious, but provided no details. The news agency ANSA reported that Muti underwent the surgery in the Italian city of Ravenna after a fall at home.
NEWS
March 28, 1987 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
When the Philadelphia Orchestra arrived here Thursday afternoon on its first Pennsylvania tour in five years, it was informed of one fact right away: Even for just an evening, Riccardo Muti wasn't the most famous Italian name in town. Muti had been warned, however. He has yet to make his debut appearance at an American football game, but he did arrive well-briefed about Penn State, football and coach Joe Paterno. Although the maestro confined himself to an intellectual understanding of the situation, some of his players got an on-site view of the school's best- known public activity.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Students waiting in the cold for rush seats to I Pagliacci last month cheered when Riccardo Muti passed the Academy of Music. Their response was Muti's clearest signal during his recent period with the Philadelphia Orchestra that his tenure had caught public imagination and excitement. As he waved and laughed, he commented that these were the people he had tried to reach as part of his vision of what the music director should be. He said it a little wistfully. In the waning months of his final season as music director - he will relinquish the title in May - he has spoken frankly about his disappointment that the City - with a capital C - is not behind the orchestra, and that the orchestra itself is in danger of slipping into eclipse as technological advances pass it by. Disappointment, he stressed, is possible only if you love something.
NEWS
August 31, 1987 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra last night played its debut at the Salzburg Festival, the most prestigious of Europe's music celebrations. It was a debut that touched off an unusual ovation after the first half, and at the end, a standing, cheering audience called conductor Riccardo Muti back for nine curtain calls. Schubert and Beethoven are the staples of this dressy showplace, where the Philadelphians are giving the closing performances, yesterday and today. But Muti had programmed against the grain.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1999 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Just when neon "Vacancy" signs are blinking on orchestra podiums everywhere, the appearance of conductor Riccardo Muti on the New York Philharmonic's podium sent speculation soaring. Muti, former music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra, led the Philharmonic in four concerts, Wednesday through yesterday, at Avery Fisher Hall. It was his first time with that orchestra and his first appearance with any other American orchestra since his debut in Philadelphia in the winter of 1972.
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NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
If global classical-music prominence were a horse race, Yannick Nézet-Séguin - with the just-announced Met appointment, in tandem with his continuing tenure with the Philadelphia Orchestra - would easily be out in front among his particularly charismatic peers. At 41, Nézet-Séguin is part of a generation of what some call "rock star" conductors who emerged late in the last decade, headed by the meteoric Gustavo Dudamel, 35, now music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic (he's also the basis of the  Mozart in the Jungle  TV character played by Gael García Bernal)
NEWS
February 22, 2016
The Consul General of Italy in Philadelphia would like to invite you for coffee, the invitation read. The invitation arrived in November. It offered dates in February. The consul general is a busy man, I figured. "Please come inside," Andrea Canepari said with a smile and the offer of an espresso when I arrived the other afternoon at his ornate office in the Public Ledger Building. He wore a pin with the Italian and American flags fastened to the lapel of his dark-blue wool suit.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
CONDUCTOR Riccardo Muti 's official website says the conductor has undergone hip surgery in Italy following an accident. The website said yesterday that as a result the music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra , and former director of the Philadelphia Orchestra , cannot conduct concerts planned this month in Chicago. It said the accident was not serious, but provided no details. The news agency ANSA reported that Muti underwent the surgery in the Italian city of Ravenna after a fall at home.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
How can something so easygoing excite such polarized reactions? Rossini's La Donna del Lago , the Metropolitan Opera's Saturday simulcast in six area theaters, has stars (Joyce DiDonato and Juan Diego Flórez), attractive melodies, a plot line borrowed from Walter Scott ( The Lady of the Lake ) plus a theatrical and musical sheen at every turn. In fact, the 12:55 p.m. simulcast is a landmark of sorts for hardcore Rossinians, the apotheosis of a hugely influential 1819 opera that fell into deep obscurity from about 1860 until 1958.
NEWS
June 4, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
TOKYO - The adventures in China were all certainly exciting for the Philadelphia Orchestra, but Tokyo's acoustically superb Suntory Hall is an old friend, where many of its best recordings with Wolfgang Sawallisch were made, and during this current tour, it comes near the end, when most residency activities are over. The orchestra arrived Sunday for "the icing on the cake," as music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin describes it. Familiar haunts for the musicians here include the Tokyo Tower Records, a bastion of compact-disc culture, loaded with Philadelphia Orchestra reissues not found anywhere else in an entire floor devoted to classical music.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
            Scott Thomas: I'm done World cinema is about to lose one of its brightest lights. Kristin Scott Thomas , who is equally at home in English-language pics ( Nowhere Boy ) or French-language ones ( I've Loved You So Long ), has decided to stop making 'em altogether, she tells London's the Guardian in a lengthy interview. Thomas, who has made 65 films, said she's overworked. In September she had a realization. "I just suddenly thought, I cannot cope with another film," says Scott Thomas, "and I just suddenly thought, I can't do it anymore.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Any other conductor would test an audience's loyalty with a Philadelphia Orchestra program featuring particularly bizarre modern music. But Simon Rattle knows his people. And though he programmed György Ligeti (as might Christoph Eschenbach), and, at one point, swiveled around and yelled toward the audience (as did Riccardo Muti), there was no loss of good will and, in fact, a standing ovation on Thursday for Ligeti's Mysteries of the Macabre . A significant ingredient was Barbara Hannigan, the Canadian new-music diva whose charisma, voice and unreserved sense of showmanship were put to great use in a scene from the Ligeti opera Le Grand Macabre , in which she plays a police chief hysterically, nonsensically warning that the end of the world is near.
NEWS
July 29, 2012
Richard B. Worley is chairman of the Philadelphia Orchestra Association The Philadelphia Orchestra is entering a new era, one of great promise and opportunity. With the conclusion of our bankruptcy, we eagerly anticipate the launch of Yannick Nézet-Séguin's inaugural season as music director. Those who attended concerts this year saw a glimpse of what is to come. It will be magical. We could not have made it this far without the cooperation and support of our musicians and staff, our partners at the Kimmel Center, and the many who made gifts, which ranged from just a few dollars to the extraordinary gifts of a small number of philanthropic heroes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2012 | Jenice Armstrong
CHANNEL 6's Rob Jennings (left) turns a newsy 64 on Wednesday. The stars say the year ahead for the 35-year WPVI-TV veteran will be a good one, filled with action. In other words, Jennings will continue on his A game. Honestly, we expect nothing less. Abington-born stand-up comic and star of the Broadway adaptation of "The Wedding Singer" Stephen Lynch will be 41 Saturday. Former Philadelphia Orchestra music director Riccardo Muti, KYW Newsradio anchor Ed Abrams and former Channel 6 reporter Susanne LaFrankie also turn the page on a new year Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
FORMER Philadelphia Orchestra conductor Riccardo Muti yesterday was awarded the $1 million Birgit Nilsson Prize for his "extraordinary" contributions and influence in the world of music. Muti, conductor of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra , has also been conductor of the Maggio Musicale Fiorentino , the Philharmonia Orchestra in London and Teatro alla Scala . "Maestro Muti is being recognized for his extraordinary contributions in opera and concert, as well as his enormou s influence in the music world both on and off the stage," the jury said in the citation.
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