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Rice Noodles

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald and INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " From the time my children were in grade school, their favorite takeout dinner, hands down, was the vermicelli noodles and chicken topped with spring rolls from Vietnam Restaurant in Chinatown. I don't mean to suggest that they were super adventurous eaters, because they weren't. But my husband used to bring home this dinner for the two of us, and soon enough the kids wanted to taste what their parents were eating.
FOOD
April 19, 2013
Lemon-Dressed Farro, Tuna, and Chickpea Salad . . . 3 Salmon Cakes . . . 2 Rice Noodles With Broccoli Pesto . . . 3 Lemon Kale Salad . . . 4  
FOOD
February 22, 1995 | By Faye Levy, FOR THE INQUIRER
Bringing a large pot of water to a boil is the most time-consuming part of cooking pasta. You can skip most of this step, however, if you use an enticing pasta from the Far East - rice noodles. All you need to do is soak the noodles briefly in hot water, then heat them in a soup, a stir-fried medley or a stew. This traditional technique of soaking and heating gives the noodles the best texture. The dried noodles are ready so quickly because they are precooked before being packaged and need only to be rehydrated.
FOOD
April 18, 2013 | By Joe Yonan, Washington Post
I try to buy produce locally and cook it seasonally. But there comes a time in late winter-early spring when I can't bear to roast another Brussels sprout, bake another sweet potato, or massage another leaf of kale into submission. That's when I buy broccoli grown who knows where and transported to my friendly neighborhood Whole Foods Market. Call it a bridge to the days of peas and asparagus. Once I get it home, I usually douse it with curry powder and roast it, or microwave it and finish it under the broiler.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1996 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Over the years, David Chan has expanded his Mai Lai Wah restaurant from a basic noodle house to a place where you can get duck specialties and a host of other provincial Chinese dishes. So when he decided to put some additional emphasis on seafood, he opened a second place, on Ninth Street, just around the corner from his 10th and Race Street Mai Lai Wah Restaurant and Noodle House. The name of this other Chinatown entry is David's Mai Lai Wah II Seafood Restaurant. As the name implies, you have a large selection of seafood choices.
FOOD
March 15, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
An excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " I know the last recipe for Thai lettuce cups sent my daughter in search of unfamiliar ingredients, namely lemongrass and fish sauce. So in the interest of thrift, not to mention continuing to expand her horizons, I offer a second recipe to use up those ingredients while they are still fresh: Thai Coconut Chicken Noodle Soup. It seems a perfect restorative for these March days, when the weather can't make up its mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1999 | By Rob Laymon, FOR THE INQUIRER
Iam standing in the kitchen of Jow's Garden, on 47th Street in West Philly, watching chef Taveechai Vickyanont practice the performance art that results in pad thai. After washing the wok, he squirts in soy oil, then tosses in a handful of shrimp. Then come eggs (swish around), tofu (swish), scallions, a big cup of rice noodles size M (swish), a quarter-scoop of chicken broth, a handful of chopped peanuts. Vickyanont fences at this farrago with his long spoons, then adds the sauce, a mixture of Thai fruit paste, lemon juice, tamarind and fish sauce (swish swish swish swish)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
If you're new to Vietnamese food, a good spot to try some is South Philadelphia's Chaur Jou. There are enough Chinese-influenced Asian dishes here to accommodate those with tentative tastes and make the less-than- adventuresome feel at home. Not only that, but the family that runs the restaurant is very obliging. And the fact that the food is well-prepared and inexpensive doesn't hurt, either. Chaur Jou has been open about two years. It's located on South Eighth Street, near Washington, in an area that has become home to a number of Asian immigrants, particularly those from Vietnam.
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
"Do you know what Tu Do means?" asked the soft-spoken waitress, as I announced myself at the end of my second visit. "It means freedom," she said. Having just seen "Platoon," I understood what she was saying perhaps more than I would have under other circumstances. Over the past decade, the resilient and hard-working Vietnamese have built a substantial enclave around the Italian Market in South Philadelphia, mostly along 8th Street from Christian to Washington Avenue. The restaurant Tu Do (pronounced "too doe")
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Shing Kee, a new restaurant on the southern fringe of Chinatown, might not win any awards for its decor or surroundings, but what it lacks in atmosphere, it more than makes up for in its food. The restaurant is housed in a modest and unadorned rectangular room. Outside, huge mounds of construction earth line the curbside. Comfortable booths occupy one side, while family-style circular tables are arranged along a mirrored wall on the other. What brightens up this otherwise drab dining room are the colorful plates of well-prepared food.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 19, 2013
Lemon-Dressed Farro, Tuna, and Chickpea Salad . . . 3 Salmon Cakes . . . 2 Rice Noodles With Broccoli Pesto . . . 3 Lemon Kale Salad . . . 4  
FOOD
April 18, 2013 | By Joe Yonan, Washington Post
I try to buy produce locally and cook it seasonally. But there comes a time in late winter-early spring when I can't bear to roast another Brussels sprout, bake another sweet potato, or massage another leaf of kale into submission. That's when I buy broccoli grown who knows where and transported to my friendly neighborhood Whole Foods Market. Call it a bridge to the days of peas and asparagus. Once I get it home, I usually douse it with curry powder and roast it, or microwave it and finish it under the broiler.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald and INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " From the time my children were in grade school, their favorite takeout dinner, hands down, was the vermicelli noodles and chicken topped with spring rolls from Vietnam Restaurant in Chinatown. I don't mean to suggest that they were super adventurous eaters, because they weren't. But my husband used to bring home this dinner for the two of us, and soon enough the kids wanted to taste what their parents were eating.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | Craig LaBan
For pho broth: 3 tablespoons sesame oil 1/2 cup onion, roughly chopped 2 tablespoons fresh ginger, chopped with peel on About 1 1/2 to 2 pounds of mushroom trimmings (portabella & shiitake stems, maitake bases, etc.) 2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar 8 ounces dried shiitakes (optional for extra depth) 2 tablespoons garlic, roughly chopped 3 quarts of water 4 whole star anise 2 whole cinnamon sticks 1 tablespoon five-spice powder (preferably Vietnamese style)
FOOD
March 15, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
An excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " I know the last recipe for Thai lettuce cups sent my daughter in search of unfamiliar ingredients, namely lemongrass and fish sauce. So in the interest of thrift, not to mention continuing to expand her horizons, I offer a second recipe to use up those ingredients while they are still fresh: Thai Coconut Chicken Noodle Soup. It seems a perfect restorative for these March days, when the weather can't make up its mind.
FOOD
April 17, 2008 | By Joyce Gemperlein FOR THE INQUIRER
Certain chicken salads get stuck in your head. I have a vivid memory of a classic chicken salad, made with mayonnaise and laced with tarragon at a fancy takeout shop in Washington, which sold for $7.99 a pound in 1983. I remember watching my friend, a busy professional woman, buy it often because she had no time to make dinner when she got home. I envied her life, and her abandon at buying what at the time I considered a very expensive food item. Would I ever be sufficiently busy and worldly to be able to justify buying expensive chicken salad?
NEWS
October 13, 2000 | by Sono Motoyama, Daily News Staff Writer
Now that it's soup weather, I'd like to sing an ode to pho, the fragrant, enticing Vietnamese meal in a bowl. Rice noodles, basil, scallions, bean sprouts, paper-thin slices of raw beef that cook before your eyes in the steaming bowl. A slice of lime on the side to squeeze in. But most important is the broth - a beef potion (sometimes with oxtail) that is light and soothing. Some pho broths I've tasted are little better than dishwater, but the pho at Pho Xe Lua is heavenly. I eat pho all year round but in wintertime, it seems particularly fortifying.
NEWS
February 27, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saigon Vietnam Restaurant gives South Jersey a chance to experience the joys of Vietnamese cuisine, an opportunity that should not be missed. Saigon was opened late last summer by An Nguyen and his mother, Huong Pham, next to Flower World on Route 38 in Pennsauken. Sadly, the site seems to be the kiss of death, for at least a dozen fine restaurants - most but not all Chinese - have failed in the last 15 years. But with the quality of Huong Pham's home-cooked dishes, generous portions and astonishingly low prices, there's perhaps a chance Saigon will have better luck than its predecessors.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1999 | By Rob Laymon, FOR THE INQUIRER
Iam standing in the kitchen of Jow's Garden, on 47th Street in West Philly, watching chef Taveechai Vickyanont practice the performance art that results in pad thai. After washing the wok, he squirts in soy oil, then tosses in a handful of shrimp. Then come eggs (swish around), tofu (swish), scallions, a big cup of rice noodles size M (swish), a quarter-scoop of chicken broth, a handful of chopped peanuts. Vickyanont fences at this farrago with his long spoons, then adds the sauce, a mixture of Thai fruit paste, lemon juice, tamarind and fish sauce (swish swish swish swish)
NEWS
May 29, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Julia Lopez was a teen-ager at a mostly white high school in New York City in the late 1970s when she was stung by yet another racist remark by a classmate. She, along with some friends, went to a drama teacher, who encouraged them to use their creative talents to reach a resolution. So they penned a play that set the school buzzing. It was a defining moment for Lopez because for the first time, she realized that the arts can be used for social change. It became "a total model for all the work I do now," said the actress and writer, who draws from her experiences as a female and a Puerto Rican for her one-woman shows.
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