CollectionsRich Dubee
IN THE NEWS

Rich Dubee

SPORTS
June 4, 2013 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
This was a game of inches, but it was also a game of aches, pains, cramps, stomach viruses and, finally, exhaustion.Did we mention there was an instant-replay triple, too? What's funny is that the Phillies' 7-5 win over the Milwaukee Brewers at Citizens Bank Park on Sunday afternoon should have been a laugher. Thanks in large part to Domonic Brown's eighth home run in eight games, the Phillies had a five-run lead after the first inning. The white-hot Brown contributed an RBI triple in the second, which ended with the Phillies up, 7-0. And that's how it stayed until the top of the eighth inning because the equally hot Cliff Lee held the Brewers scoreless while striking out a season-high 11 hitters through the first seven.
SPORTS
May 26, 2013 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - The latest reminder of how fragile young pitching is happened last week, when Minnesota demoted its opening-day starter to triple A. For two seasons, Vance Worley mystified hitters as a mainstay in the Phillies' rotation. No one threw a higher percentage of his pitches for called strikes. The rest of baseball adjusted when the Twins acquired him. Worley allowed 82 hits in 482/3 innings for a 7.21 ERA and became a Rochester Red Wing before May concluded. This is particularly relevant to Jonathan Pettibone, the latest unheralded, 22-year-old pitcher to crash the Phillies' rotation.
SPORTS
May 22, 2013 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jonathan Papelbon is in the century club. According to baseball-almanac.com, there is video evidence of his fastball being clocked at 100 m.p.h. during an April 22, 2008 game at Fenway Park. It's a cool accomplishment because there are so few people on this planet who can generate that kind of arm speed. But velocity is like good looks. Eventually, unless you're a super freak like Nolan Ryan, the speed of a pitcher's fastball is going to decline. Papelbon, in his second season with the Phillies, decided last year to take that matter into his own hands in an effort to prolong his career.
SPORTS
May 16, 2013 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Staff Writer
FIFTH STARTER. Fifth of five. That was supposed to be Jonathan Pettibone's job while John Lannan found himself on the disabled list. It is a job with low expectations and, simultaneously, with real meaning - especially for a team like the Phillies, a team that has had so much trouble generating consistent offense and that has been underwater in the standings for weeks. Pettibone arrived unheralded. No one knew what to expect, not really. When he pitched well in his first game, the Phillies were not even ready to acknowledge immediately that he would get a second start.
SPORTS
May 8, 2013 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
SAN FRANCISCO - If the Phillies had information Tuesday regarding Roy Halladay's health, they were not sharing it with the world. A cloud of uncertainty remained over their rotation and the star righthander's future. Halladay saw a doctor Tuesday, this much is sure. But the Phillies did not release any further updates. It was unknown exactly when during the day Halladay saw Neal ElAttrache, the Dodgers' team physician, in Los Angeles, and what tests were performed. An MRI examination was expected.
SPORTS
May 8, 2013 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
It's a pretty easy choice. You can be mad at Andrew Bynum or you can be mad at Roy Halladay. You can't be mad at both. Bynum spent the final year of his contract unable to play a single minute of basketball. There was bowling at one end of his wasted season and flamenco dancing at the other, but Bynum made sure the Sixers knew of every twinge of discomfort in his 25-year-old knees. Halladay is spending the final year of his contract trying desperately to play baseball. There is no off-the-field nonsense, only a man working as hard as he can to find a way to earn his money.
SPORTS
May 5, 2013 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phillies pitcher Roy Halladay denounced critical comments about Phillies pitching coach Rich Dubee made by former Phillies reliever and current MLB Network analyst Mitch Williams. In a Friday radio interview on WIP-FM (94.1), Williams said the Phillies need a new pitching coach. "It is not personal," Williams said. "I think these pitchers have to hear something new. " The Phillies have struggled not only in pitching but all facets of the game. They entered Friday 26th in the major leagues with a 4.42 ERA. Halladay, one of the pitchers that Williams suggested hasn't been helped by Dubee, talked to reporters before Friday's game at Citizens Bank Park against the Miami Marlins.
SPORTS
April 29, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
NEW YORK - After blowing leads late in each of the last two games, the Phillies arrived at Citi Field with another bullpen problem: The availability of their setup man was unknown. Mike Adams, who pitched in three of the previous four games, was held out of action Thursday when the Phillies watched a 3-1 lead after seven innings turn into a 6-4 loss to the Pirates. Both manager Charlie Manuel and pitching coach Rich Dubee were unsure whether they'd have Adams at their disposal against the New York Mets last night.
SPORTS
April 10, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
IT'S THE pitchers, stupid. If the glares from across the opposite side of the room could talk, that's likely what they would have said. On Monday afternoon at Citizens Bank Park, before the Phillies lost another game because of another lackluster pitching performance, a herd of 20-some reporters surrounded catcher Erik Kratz at his locker after the lineup was posted. Kratz, who had started five of the first six games, was not in the lineup to catch Roy Halladay. As the questions for Kratz somehow continued for nearly 10 minutes, a trio of starting pitchers looked on and obviously knew what was up. The easy-to-write story was that the Phils pitchers and catchers weren't in sync, and thus, a change behind the plate in the form of Humberto Quintero.
SPORTS
April 10, 2013 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bruce Springsteen blared on the sound system at the end of the sixth inning Monday night at Citizens Bank Park. I had a friend who was a big baseball player . . . He could throw that speedball by you, make you look like a fool, boy . . . Glory days, well, they'll pass you by . . . Roy Halladay wasn't around to hear it. His latest ominous outing had ended after three consecutive batters reached base in the top of the fifth inning....
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|