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Richard Codey

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NEWS
September 8, 2004 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
In the realm of politics, Richard Codey is no Jim McGreevey. While McGreevey angled for years to become governor, Codey gave the job no real thought - until recently, and only because it will become his by default. While McGreevey made alliances with Democratic power brokers, Codey gained a reputation for feuding with them. And while McGreevey reveled in traveling the state, making speeches and glad-handing the public, the Senate president spurned political fetes in favor of watching Seton Hall University basketball games with his two teenage sons.
NEWS
December 17, 2004
New Jersey Democrats have forged a compromise that would enable residents to elect a lieutenant governor beginning in 2009. In the interim, the measure improves the succession process from the current slap-in-the-face to governmental checks and balances. The Legislature should put this bill atop its agenda when it returns in January. Now, if a governor leaves office early - as Govs. James McGreevey and Christie Whitman did (for vastly different reasons) - the Senate president takes over but retains his legislative leadership.
NEWS
December 11, 2004
For someone who proclaims his commitment to cleaning up politics in New Jersey, acting Gov. Richard Codey is allowing an important opportunity to pass by. Codey is refusing to allow the state Senate, where he also serves as president, to vote on an important reform bill addressing "pay-to-play" politics. Monday is the last day of this year's session for a vote on it. The bill, S1987, would allow municipalities across New Jersey to enact their own bans on the sleazy practice of awarding government jobs to contractors who donate generously to politicians' campaign coffers.
NEWS
October 25, 2004 | By Dave Boyer
News item: Gov. McGreevey has insisted on staying in office until midnight on his last day as governor, Nov. 15. Knock, knock. "Who's there?" Gov. McGreevey called out from behind the locked door of the mansion. "Acting Gov. Richard Codey. " "Acting Gov. Richard Codey who?" "Jim, open the door," Codey said. "No! Go away!" Codey sighed, and set down his suitcase on the front porch of Drumthwacket, the governor's residence. He knocked on the front door again, harder this time.
NEWS
January 13, 2005
Richard Codey proved again this week that he has no intention of being a mere caretaker in his 14 months as acting governor of New Jersey. In the governor's annual "State of the State" address Tuesday, he proposed bold ideas to "watch out for our neighbors and help those down on their luck" - the poor, uninsured, mentally and chronically ill. He also lashed out at Washington's lack of funding for state homeland security needs and lamented Trenton's...
NEWS
October 27, 2005
New Jersey voters can help clean up state government and polluted air by voting YES on the two public questions on the Nov. 8 ballot. Question No. 1 would establish the long-needed office of lieutenant governor, beginning in 2009, to fill any vacancy in the top job. Candidates for lieutenant would run on a party ticket with the gubernatorial candidate, as the U.S. president and vice president do. It would not be a post devoid of duties....
NEWS
August 17, 2004
Gov. McGreevey should step down immediately and allow New Jersey voters to choose an interim governor who will lead the state until January 2006. That's in the best interests of the public, which is reeling from yet another scandal in Trenton. In case you've been in an isolation chamber, McGreevey last week announced that he is resigning, that he is gay and that he had an extramarital affair (allegedly with a man whom he had placed on the state payroll). Whether the governor was having an affair with a subordinate or sexually harassing him (as the man claims)
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Christie put any speculation about his future in the Trenton to rest Monday, announcing that he would run for a second term as governor next November. The 50-year-old Republican made the announcement while visiting police and fire crews in Fort Monmouth, one of many shore towns ravaged by Sandy earlier this month, saying the storm cemented the decision. "The public needs to know that I'm in this for the long haul. That the person that led them through the initial crisis wants to be here to lead them through the rebuilding and restoration of our state," he said.
NEWS
January 1, 2002 | By Jon Shure
If a small country had four leaders in eight days, the health of democracy there would surely be questioned. Well, the great state of New Jersey will have no fewer than four governors between next Tuesday and Jan. 15. And while part of this is due to an unforeseeable convergence of events, we, too, should be asking whether a thwarting of the democratic process is also at fault. The gubernatorial succession samba started with Donald DiFrancesco's becoming acting governor because he was Senate president when Gov. Christie Whitman resigned to become head of the federal Environmental Protection Agency.
NEWS
July 28, 2000 | By Eugene Kiely and Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For the first time since an embarrassing photo of her frisking a black man in Camden surfaced, Gov. Whitman returned to the city yesterday determined to shine a spotlight on the good things she is doing there. But she found herself in the glare instead, fielding a barrage of questions about her conduct and her policies regarding the city. On a day when the governor visited Camden with millions of dollars for new initiatives, Senate Democratic leaders in Trenton announced their opposition to her plan for an unprecedented state takeover of Camden.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 21, 2013 | Matt Katz, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
TRENTON - The Booker Watch is so 2012. We're now on the Codey Watch. After Democratic Newark Mayor Cory Booker opted to pursue the U.S. Senate in 2014 instead of Republican Gov. Christie's seat this November, many Democrats turned to a familiar name who already has "governor" on his resumé: State Sen. Richard Codey of Essex County. Codey is actively pursuing/considering/flirting with a run against Christie. He's headed to Washington on Tuesday to meet with big union leaders and the Democratic Governors Association to ask for guarantees on serious cash ($30 million)
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Christie put any speculation about his future in the Trenton to rest Monday, announcing that he would run for a second term as governor next November. The 50-year-old Republican made the announcement while visiting police and fire crews in Fort Monmouth, one of many shore towns ravaged by Sandy earlier this month, saying the storm cemented the decision. "The public needs to know that I'm in this for the long haul. That the person that led them through the initial crisis wants to be here to lead them through the rebuilding and restoration of our state," he said.
NEWS
January 11, 2006
Only in New Jersey. Only in New Jersey would the outgoing governor give the current year's "State of the State" address, to be followed a week later by the new governor's inaugural speech and a month later by a budget address. That's more civic briefing than even government junkies need. Only in New Jersey would that outgoing governor be a 30-year legislator who's also president of the Senate and stepped in when the previous governor resigned amid a sex scandal. The very same legislator also covered the top job for a few hours in 2002 in another bizarre gubernatorial transition.
NEWS
December 25, 2005 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
He cracked jokes, nearly punched an obnoxious shock jock, and broke the news that the state was teetering toward bankruptcy. And New Jerseyans loved him for it. Acting Gov. Richard J. Codey, regular Jersey guy turned accidental governor, so charmed this state's jaded residents that they did the unthinkable: They forgot about former Gov. Jim McGreevey. In the nearly 14 months since McGreevey left office after disclosing that he'd had an affair with a man, Codey plugged a $4 billion budget deficit, improved services for people with mental illness, instituted strict government ethics rules, and kept North Jersey's professional football teams playing in the state.
NEWS
November 14, 2005 | By Dave Boyer
We take you now to a meeting of Gov.-elect Jon Corzine and acting Gov. Richard Codey in the very near future . . . Corzine: "Dick, thanks for meeting with me. As you know, I will be sworn in as governor very soon. And I could sure use your advice about the job. " Codey: "I'm happy to help, Jon. The most important things are to keep your sense of humor, and always be your own man. " Corzine: "Sounds easy enough. " The buzz of an intercom interrupts. Aide: "Gov.
NEWS
October 27, 2005
New Jersey voters can help clean up state government and polluted air by voting YES on the two public questions on the Nov. 8 ballot. Question No. 1 would establish the long-needed office of lieutenant governor, beginning in 2009, to fill any vacancy in the top job. Candidates for lieutenant would run on a party ticket with the gubernatorial candidate, as the U.S. president and vice president do. It would not be a post devoid of duties....
NEWS
June 13, 2005 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Power in Trenton - and the responsibility of crafting an approximately $28 billion budget - lies in the hands of two Democrats, acting Gov. Richard J. Codey and Assembly Majority Leader Joseph Roberts. And they're not getting along. Locked in a power struggle that threatens to hinder this month's budget negotiations, the plainspoken, jovial governor from North Jersey and the smooth, serious assemblyman from South Jersey have staked out opposing positions on nearly every state issue.
NEWS
March 2, 2005 | By Kaitlin Gurney and Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey's politicians have spent the state to the brink of financial disaster, acting Gov. Richard J. Codey said yesterday as he proposed a $27.4 billion budget that would shrink spending for the first time in nearly a decade. The state's chief of four months proposed eliminating popular property-tax rebates for most residents, freezing aid to schools and municipalities, selling off surplus state property, and expanding the sales tax to luxury items such as artificial tans and limo rides.
NEWS
February 7, 2005 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Why raise taxes when you could put the New Jersey Turnpike on the auction block? Why cut spending when you could make millions by overhauling a state nonprofit? For acting Gov. Richard J. Codey, the answers are easy. With the state facing its fourth budget gap in as many years, the chief executive of just three months has said he is preparing "creative" and "out-of-the-box" proposals to fill the more than $4 billion hole. Obvious ways to help the state's cash flow - raising the income tax on millionaires, boosting cigarette taxes, and sealing loopholes in corporate business taxes - have all been done, and the state Supreme Court has curbed lawmakers' borrow-and-spend ways.
NEWS
January 13, 2005
Richard Codey proved again this week that he has no intention of being a mere caretaker in his 14 months as acting governor of New Jersey. In the governor's annual "State of the State" address Tuesday, he proposed bold ideas to "watch out for our neighbors and help those down on their luck" - the poor, uninsured, mentally and chronically ill. He also lashed out at Washington's lack of funding for state homeland security needs and lamented Trenton's...
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