CollectionsRichard Goode
IN THE NEWS

Richard Goode

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1993 | By Ken Keuffel Jr., FOR THE INQUIRER
In the beginning years of Richard Goode's career, the pianist shunned competitions, choosing instead to devote himself to intense study and chamber music performance. In a recent New Yorker article, clarinetist Richard Stoltzman, a frequent chamber music partner of Goode's, said Goode's musical route gave him "the depth and breadth of intensive meditation on music which only an enormous amount of time has made possible. " Depth and breadth, along with commanding confidence, characterize the recital Goode offered Wednesday at the Port of History Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
What could Bach and Chopin possibly have to say to each other? Not much, it turns out. But the fact the two aren't on speaking terms didn't diminish the effect of Richard Goode's Thursday night recital at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater. Goode is a frequent visitor to the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, and this time he toggled back and forth between dance forms made inestimably more sophisticated by the two composers, who were separated by only a century. Even if it's being a little too blunt, it's fair to say that Goode argued for considerably less extreme expressive liberties in Chopin than most other pianists do. And in Bach, if Goode's rubato was neither thickly applied nor understated, his choice of moments to apply that rubato was wise and satisfying.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1986 | By Michael Kimmelman, Inquirer Music Critic
Richard Goode has been busy lately playing Beethoven piano sonatas. He is currently in the midst of recording all 32 for Book-of-the-Month Club records, the first volume of which has come out already. Last night, as part of the Mozart on the Square Festival, he performed four of the sonatas at Temple Beth Zion-Beth Israel. It was among the most memorable piano recitals in recent months. Goode has always been one of those underappreciated artists whose reputation among fellow musicians has seemed to be greater than his recognition among the public at large.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
American pianist Richard Goode has risen to the summit of his craft, utilizing a probing spirit and outstanding technical gifts without a trace of show-biz flamboyance. He's perhaps most famous for his concert traversals of all 32 Beethoven piano sonatas, the supreme challenge for a pianist, recorded almost completely on joint issues by Book-of-the-Month Club and Elektra/ Nonesuch Records. Goode's Sunday program at the Port of History Museum will include works from the heart of his repertory: his favorite sonata of Mozart (K.533)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, Music Critic
The current season of Opera Philadelphia's high ambition came, if not to a rest, then at least to a relative slowing Friday night with the opening of a Santa Fe Opera/Stephen Lawless production of L'elisir d'amore . This is the company's fourth iteration of the work since 1982, and though Donizetti's score can grow dull, there are still good reasons to believe that there is magic to be had between the notes. The current iteration at the Academy of Music has at least two such reasons.
NEWS
October 12, 1987 | By MARIA GALLAGHER, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writer Joseph Grace contributed to this report.)
It was no surprise to see former heavyweight boxing champion Smokin' Joe Frazier grab a microphone and slide into a soulful rendition of "Proud Mary" at a post-debate party for Frank L. Rizzo's supporters. After all, when Frazier retired from the ring in the late 1970s, he launched a nightclub act that featured his singing talents, such as they are. But Smokin' Joe was nearly upstaged by someone who horned in on the mike in midsong: that renowned crooner, Joe Rocks, whose day jobs are Pennsylvania state senator and key Rizzo campaign aide.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1996 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Make no mistake: Richard Goode is a first-rate pianist whose ability to get beneath the printed note is rare, and his talents have only deepened with time. Goode, in recital Thursday night in a single performance at the Haverford School's Centennial Hall, brought eloquence to Bach, polish to Mozart and a genteel, understated passion to Brahms and Chopin. You can take exception to some of Goode's interpretative decisions; it's easy, for instance, to call to mind pianists who think of Chopin's Nocturne in E flat major (Op. 55, No. 2)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Main Line cornered the market on extraordinary piano playing over the weekend when Richard Goode played at the Haverford School's Centennial Hall - and, then, over in Roberts Hall at Haverford College, Russian pianist Tatyana Nikolaeva made a much-belated debut appearance. Goode played Beethoven sonatas Sunday afternoon; the night before, Nikolaeva interpreted preludes and fugues by J.S. Bach and Shostakovich. With programs like that, how could a piano aficionado go wrong? Nor can you ever go astray listening to an artist of Goode's caliber.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | By JOSEPH GRACE, Daily News Staff Writer
The bright television lights were still trained on the open manhole, where city workers in the sewer had just found the body of 2-year-old Nolan Robertson Deal, missing since he fell into another manhole on Sunday. Carl Shaw, a Water Department worker, had searched for the Deal child since Sunday and was in the sewer moments before the body was found. After the discovery, he stepped out of the TV lights into the darkness of Fairmount Park and began to walk away. "You can't bring life back, but I'm overcome," Shaw said as he walked down Forbidden Drive, a gravel footpath along the Wissahickon Creek.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, Music Critic
The current season of Opera Philadelphia's high ambition came, if not to a rest, then at least to a relative slowing Friday night with the opening of a Santa Fe Opera/Stephen Lawless production of L'elisir d'amore . This is the company's fourth iteration of the work since 1982, and though Donizetti's score can grow dull, there are still good reasons to believe that there is magic to be had between the notes. The current iteration at the Academy of Music has at least two such reasons.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The artistic solidity on which Richard Goode made his name has given way to encroaching adventurousness over the years, though the limitations of that were intermittently apparent at his Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital Tuesday at the Kimmel Center. The program was a typical Goode cross section: Unjustly neglected Mozart ( Adagio in B minor ), the core repertoire of Beethoven's Piano Sonata in F-sharp major Op. 78 , ongoing explorations of Debussy, and a relatively new acquaintance with Schumann's Humoreske . Though the Beethoven seemed a little tired in this outing, Debussy's Children's Corner showed what has made Goode an eminent pianist.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Sometimes, the greater the musician, the narrower the path as time goes on. So it seems with pianist Richard Goode, who is presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society at least once every season. On Tuesday, he seemed to be cycling out of two of the three composers on the program, but connecting with the third in ways one normally wouldn't dare hope for. The 70-year-old pianist played from memory what was no doubt an old friend - Schumann's Davidsbundlertanze Op. 6 - though one less welcome than Debussy's Preludes Book I , not played from memory.
NEWS
December 10, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Though deeply loved as the city's chief musical importer, the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society strikes a thoughtful balance between local and foreign. Friday night's partnership between Curtis Institute of Music student Sarah Shafer and venerable pianist Richard Goode was a particularly successful incident of this kind of blending. One might also conclude that reaching across the generations was efficacious. The program of mostly Schubert and Brahms nestled piano repertoire alongside songs (they also joined in a Mahler song)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The old saying that great Beethoven pianists don't understand Chopin is largely untrue. Thanks to YouTube, aren't we thoroughly well-informed about everything? Well, art defies information. And at his annual sold-out Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital Thursday, Richard Goode could have used a buffer zone between the two composers. The first half of the Kimmel Center concert had Goode on solid home territory with Beethoven and Mozart, whose Fantasy in C minor (K. 475 )
NEWS
April 24, 2010 | By Daniel Webster FOR THE INQUIRER
It's hard to pin down music's values. Just when some canonic order seems to establish what is vital and what is dross, a disturbing figure steps in and scatters it all to the winds. Blame Haydn for the latest upset, and blame pianist Richard Goode for pointing it out. Goode closed the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society's piano series Thursday with a program that was as much subtle cultural dialogue as keyboard display. At the center of his recital at the Perelman Theater were three sonatas by Haydn, that unassuming, workaday composer who keeps demanding new appraisals and new admiration.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
What could Bach and Chopin possibly have to say to each other? Not much, it turns out. But the fact the two aren't on speaking terms didn't diminish the effect of Richard Goode's Thursday night recital at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater. Goode is a frequent visitor to the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, and this time he toggled back and forth between dance forms made inestimably more sophisticated by the two composers, who were separated by only a century. Even if it's being a little too blunt, it's fair to say that Goode argued for considerably less extreme expressive liberties in Chopin than most other pianists do. And in Bach, if Goode's rubato was neither thickly applied nor understated, his choice of moments to apply that rubato was wise and satisfying.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2008 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For the first time in my concert-going memory, pianist Richard Goode merely lived up to his name. By anybody else's standard, his Wednesday recital at the Kimmel Center, presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, was still awfully good. Even on autopilot, Goode's playing retains its basic virtues: an artistic sensibility that inhabits the interpretive middle road out of conviction rather than caution, and programs that juxtapose composers and pieces in ways that make you hear the music differently regardless of the performance.
NEWS
December 1, 2005 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The world didn't know how much it needed Richard Goode's Beethoven piano sonata recordings until they were collected, a dozen years ago, from sources as humble as the Book-of-the-Month Club. The resulting boxed set placed him among the very best of the post-Rudolf Serkin pianists. Of course, confronting Beethoven isn't a onetime event, and it doesn't get any easier. In Goode's all-Beethoven recital, presented Tuesday at the Kimmel Center by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, the interpretive threads seemed temporarily lost in some works and rediscovered spectacularly in others.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|