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Richard Hayne

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BUSINESS
June 23, 2000 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citing slower-than-expected sales, Urban Outfitters Inc. said yesterday that its earnings for the current quarter would be lower than forecast and down from the same period last year. The Philadelphia retailer blamed the problem on lagging sales in its Urban Retail and Anthropologie stores that have been open for at least a year. "There was not the compelling fashion trend to keep sales driving," the company's chief financial officer, Stephen A. Feldman, said in an interview.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2005 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two groups have demanded that Philadelphia-based Urban Outfitters Inc. remove from its stores a T-shirt that contains language the groups consider offensive. The message on the T-shirt - "New Mexico, Cleaner Than Regular Mexico" - could promote "negative and racist ideas of 'the dirty Mexican,' " according to the Web site of BlueLatinos.org, a Latino advocacy group in Washington. The group also has started an online petition to encourage the company to remove the T-shirts from its stores.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
From the time he opened his first retail shop - Free People, filled with secondhand and vintage clothes, scented candles, and inexpensive jewelry - more than 40 years ago, Richard Hayne has cut across the grain. That first "hippie store" just outside the University of Pennsylvania campus morphed into Urban Outfitters, the store, soon the chain, and finally the empire, with a collection of brands - Urban Outfitters, Anthropologie, Free People, Terrain, and BHLDN. It left Hayne a very wealthy man, and one not shy to preach, in his own fashion, the gospel of entrepreneurship.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Urban Outfitters Inc. continues to struggle to right its signature brand, whose poor first-quarter performance held back the company's broader success. Sales for the brand, Urban Outfitters, fell 5.2 percent from the same quarter in 2013, to $277.7 million. "Lower merchandise margins at the Urban Outfitters brand resulting from poor-performing product contributed to the decline," the company said. Urban was eclipsed in total sales by stablemate Anthropologie Group. Anthropologie, which targets women 28 to 45 years of age with a mix of casual wear, home furnishings, and gifts, reported a 10.3 percent increase in sales to $295.8 million.
NEWS
June 1, 2008 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
It had been a record week, and the vibe at Urban Outfitters headquarters was high. Adrenaline was palpable in executive offices, in design huddles, and on down to the models in skimpy threads pouting for a Free People Web shoot. It was mid-March, and the retailer of insurgent chic had reported killer profits while other retailers watched shoppers weary of high gas prices go into hiding. You could almost hear towels snap a few days earlier as Wall Street analysts congratulated executives for putting up such good numbers.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2004 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Urban Outfitters Inc., the Philadelphia clothing and accessories retailer, opened new stores at a rapid clip last year, helping to push its fourth-quarter and fiscal-year sales and earnings to record levels, the company reported yesterday. Urban Outfitters' net income more than doubled, and its total sales were up 50 percent in the fourth quarter. Sales at stores open at least a year - considered the best measure of success in retailing - increased 21 percent in the quarter, indicating a good response during the holiday season to its merchandise, the company said.
NEWS
May 14, 2013
By Jun-Youb "JY" Lee A recent gala headlined by John Legend celebrated the University of Pennsylvania's exceeding its $3.5 billion fund-raising goal by $800 million. But only blocks away, University City High School students quietly emptied their lockers following the Philadelphia School Reform Commission decision to close their school and 22 others to cover a $300 million budget deficit. It's ironic that a university can raise $4.3 billion during its five-year campaign, yet an entire city can't raise $300 million for its schoolchildren.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the flagship listing, it is all hands on deck over at Urban Outfitters Inc. Even the boss' wife has joined the bucket brigade. How bad are things? Well, the iconic purveyor of hip just completed its fifth straight quarter of slipping sales. For the record, that's Urban Outfitters, the brand. The overarching company of the same name - No. 20 on the Philly50 - saw sales up, thanks to Anthropologie and Free People, the firm's other major brands. Still, that success hardly ameliorates the disappointment in the missteps of the company's firstborn.
NEWS
October 9, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Urban Outfitters, the iconic purveyor of hip clothing and housewares, doubled down on the city and state Monday, announcing that it was expanding its Philadelphia headquarters and adding a distribution center in Lancaster County. The expansion will ultimately mean an additional 2,000 jobs in the city and 500 in Gap, according to Richard Hayne, Urban Outfitters' founder and chief executive officer, who spoke at a news conference at the Marriott Hotel in Center City. The firm said it was investing $210 million in the projects, which include refurbishing a 250,000-square-foot structure at the Navy Yard and constructing a 1.2 million-square-foot distribution center in Salisbury Township, Lancaster County.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1997 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Twenty years and 25 stores ago, Richard Hayne moved his hippie apparel and housewares store from a rowhouse storefront to a nearby warehouse at 4040 Locust St. With its selection of Indian print bedspreads, peasant blouses and faded jeans, Urban Outfitters was a cool place for the college crowd to shop. Now Hayne, a former VISTA volunteer who spent a year helping build houses in an isolated Eskimo hunting and fishing village, owns an urban empire that is publicly traded and tracked by the pinstriped set on Wall Street.
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BUSINESS
May 25, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the flagship listing, it is all hands on deck over at Urban Outfitters Inc. Even the boss' wife has joined the bucket brigade. How bad are things? Well, the iconic purveyor of hip just completed its fifth straight quarter of slipping sales. For the record, that's Urban Outfitters, the brand. The overarching company of the same name - No. 20 on the Philly50 - saw sales up, thanks to Anthropologie and Free People, the firm's other major brands. Still, that success hardly ameliorates the disappointment in the missteps of the company's firstborn.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Urban Outfitters Inc. continues to struggle to right its signature brand, whose poor first-quarter performance held back the company's broader success. Sales for the brand, Urban Outfitters, fell 5.2 percent from the same quarter in 2013, to $277.7 million. "Lower merchandise margins at the Urban Outfitters brand resulting from poor-performing product contributed to the decline," the company said. Urban was eclipsed in total sales by stablemate Anthropologie Group. Anthropologie, which targets women 28 to 45 years of age with a mix of casual wear, home furnishings, and gifts, reported a 10.3 percent increase in sales to $295.8 million.
NEWS
October 9, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Urban Outfitters, the iconic purveyor of hip clothing and housewares, doubled down on the city and state Monday, announcing that it was expanding its Philadelphia headquarters and adding a distribution center in Lancaster County. The expansion will ultimately mean an additional 2,000 jobs in the city and 500 in Gap, according to Richard Hayne, Urban Outfitters' founder and chief executive officer, who spoke at a news conference at the Marriott Hotel in Center City. The firm said it was investing $210 million in the projects, which include refurbishing a 250,000-square-foot structure at the Navy Yard and constructing a 1.2 million-square-foot distribution center in Salisbury Township, Lancaster County.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
From the time he opened his first retail shop - Free People, filled with secondhand and vintage clothes, scented candles, and inexpensive jewelry - more than 40 years ago, Richard Hayne has cut across the grain. That first "hippie store" just outside the University of Pennsylvania campus morphed into Urban Outfitters, the store, soon the chain, and finally the empire, with a collection of brands - Urban Outfitters, Anthropologie, Free People, Terrain, and BHLDN. It left Hayne a very wealthy man, and one not shy to preach, in his own fashion, the gospel of entrepreneurship.
NEWS
May 14, 2013
By Jun-Youb "JY" Lee A recent gala headlined by John Legend celebrated the University of Pennsylvania's exceeding its $3.5 billion fund-raising goal by $800 million. But only blocks away, University City High School students quietly emptied their lockers following the Philadelphia School Reform Commission decision to close their school and 22 others to cover a $300 million budget deficit. It's ironic that a university can raise $4.3 billion during its five-year campaign, yet an entire city can't raise $300 million for its schoolchildren.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2012
In the Region EmberClear to build Pa. power plant EmberClear Corp. , a Canadian power developer, announced plans to build a 300-megawatt generation plant, fueled by natural gas, on a site in Schuylkill County where it had once envisioned a plant fueled by coal. Based in Calgary, EmberClear said it had selected SK E&C USA to build the Good Spring Natural Gas Combined Cycle power plant for as much as $400 million. Construction, scheduled to start in 2013, would be completed by 2015.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter honored billionaire businessman Richard A. Hayne with the 2011 Edward Powell Award on Monday. The Urban Outfitters Inc. founder said he would donate the $100,000 prize to Drexel University, along with another $100,000 of his own fortune. The award, bestowed every four years on a business leader deemed to have contributed significantly to the city's economic prosperity, was presented to Hayne at the annual Mayoral Luncheon of the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce held at the Sheraton at 17th and Race Streets.
NEWS
December 13, 2011 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the start of this iffy holiday season, a well-dressed woman in her late 50s stopped by Grace Gardner's fair-trade clothes and accessories stand at 18th and Walnut and, without the usual shopper's deliberation, began picking out the things she wanted. "I'll take one of those and one of these, that one over there, and this one," the customer said. Gardner, thrilled, worked to keep up, harvesting the goods from her display. Elfin-green and sugar-pink hand-knitted mittens from Nepal; rainbow-striped hand-loomed belts and bags from Guatemala; nubbly cotton jackets from California; woolly baby hats, dangly earrings, and woven backpacks from Peru and Ecuador.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Old drugstore brands don't always fall off the shelf. Sometimes they get shipped to the suburbs of Philadelphia, where a few small drug firms specialize in over-the-counter brand repair. Remember Sucrets ? The cough drops once made by Philadelphia's Smith, Kline & French are now among dozens of brands owned by Insight Pharmaceuticals Corp. , a 24-person Langhorne firm. Boss Gary Downing , an executive at the former Rhone-Poulenc Rorer Inc. , among other drugmakers, claims a "dramatic" sales jump since he returned Sucrets to their old metal containers last year and started an ad campaign proclaiming, "It's all in the tin. " Insight also owns Anacin painkillers (formerly owned by Wyeth )
NEWS
June 24, 2010 | By Don Steinberg, FOR THE INQUIRER
We think of them as a gray-suited crowd, but highly paid chief executive officers come in all stripes. Here from our list are a few who are noteworthy - because they are women, or have gained or lost significant pay, or head some of the region's lesser-known and intriguing companies. Women Ellen Kullman , 54 DuPont Co., Wilmington Total 2009 Pay: $8,343,305 Kullman's ascent to CEO - as the first female chief executive in DuPont's 206-year history - was announced in September 2008, the same month Lehman Bros.
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