CollectionsRichard Iii
IN THE NEWS

Richard Iii

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
His kingdom for a horse! Laurence Olivier directed himself in Richard III (1956), playing the part of Shakespeare's crookbacked, scheming duke. As Olivier embodies the dastardly duke, Richard's ambition is as deformed as his body and his wit sharp as the knife he plunges into the backs of other pretenders to the throne. Because the film co-stars John Gielgud and Ralph Richardson, it boasts the triumvirate that ruled British theater during this century. Richard III will be shown Sunday at 1:45 p.m. at the Central Library's Montgomery Auditorium.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Lantern Theater's superb production of Richard III fully delivers this fascinating play. Shakespeare's history plays are full of pageantry and spectacle, usually performed with large casts on large stages, but here, the tiny unadorned stage ("two boards and a passion," as the saying goes), gives us intimate engagement with the drama. Imaginatively staged, powerfully acted, and shrewdly directed by Charles McMahon, this is one not to miss. One of Shakespeare's earlier meditations on power, Richard III's plot is immensely complicated by many characters, two royal families, civil war, and many, many murders.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
Who is killing the royal members of Britain's House of Plantagenet? According to Shakespeare's murder-laden Richard III , in free performances this month by the Commonwealth Classic Theatre Company at parks across the region, it's the title character himself. With the help of hit men, of course. History is not so certain; Richard, who ruled for two years in the late 1400s and endowed King's College of Cambridge, may have been responsible for the murders of the two young princes who were ahead of him in the line of succession, and may have helped deal similarly with several other relatives - but may have doesn't make a good Elizabethan play.
NEWS
February 6, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
He never got that horse. Richard III, that is. In Act 5, Scene 4, of Shakespeare's Tragedy of King Richard the Third , it's all going south for the hunchback murderer-king, but he defies fate to the last. "A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse," he cries. Turns out he probably did die on his feet, no helmet, cut down by various medieval weapons. Archaeologists, historians, and other experts at the University of Leicester told the world Monday: The bones of Richard III, last Plantagenet king, last English king to die in battle, and delectably admirable Shakespearean villain-hero   , have been found.
NEWS
March 23, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Murdering his way to the throne, Shakespeare's hunchback Richard III, the villain we love to hate, is a terrific and terrifying character. Lantern Theater's production of Richard III, in previews beginning tomorrow and opening Wednesday, brings a surprise: Pete Pryor in the title role, directed by Charles McMahon. Pryor is best known for his split-second comic timing and perfect deadpan, with glittering gazes that silently require the audience's complicity. He's eager to essay this "intimidating role," saying, "It's so huge, with so many ideas, but what an opportunity!"
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | By Gwen Florio, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Toad," they called him. "Bloody dog. " "Lump of foul deformity. " "Diffused infection of a man. " And no wonder. He had his brother and his brother's two young sons killed. He married his wife after stabbing her husband and her father to death. When the tragedy had finally played itself out, he was responsible for 11 murders. Face it. Making this guy look good is like trying to pass off Hannibal the Cannibal as the Galloping Gourmet. But 20 Philadelphia-area residents think it's worth a try, even though the object of their crusade has been dead for more than 500 years.
NEWS
September 21, 1990 | By Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
The longing for justice, fairness and truth burns in some with an intensity that can astound those of lesser commitment. So, many newspaper readers must have been amazed to read a paid "In Memoriam" notice that appeared on the obituary pages of the Daily News and Inquirer on Aug. 22 that read: "Plantagenet, Richard. Duke of Gloucester. King of England. A true friend of the Rights of Man. Murdered by traitors this day on Bosworth's Field, 1485 . . . He merits our devoted remembrance.
NEWS
February 5, 2013
LEICESTER, ENGLAND - He was king of England, but for centuries he lay without shroud or coffin in an unknown grave, and his name became a byword for villainy. On Monday, scientists announced that they had rescued the remains of Richard III from anonymity. The monarch's fans hope a revival of his reputation will soon follow. In a dramatically orchestrated news conference, a team of scientists from the University of Leicester announced that tests had proved what they scarcely dared to hope - that a scarred and broken skeleton unearthed under a drab municipal parking lot was that of the 15th-century king, the last English monarch to die in battle.
NEWS
October 26, 1993 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Conceivably there are some among us who believe that the list of African- American actors who have played Shakespeare begins and ends with Paul Robeson, a grievous misconception addressed by the playwright Carlyle Brown when he sat down to write "The African Company Presents Richard III. " This charming little play, which is receiving its area premiere via a Venture Theater production at Stage III, centers on the first all-black theater company...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1996 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard III: He's hot, he's hip, he's hunchbacked. Shakespeare's misanthropic megalomaniac, the man who would be Lady Anne's man, the monarch who would trade his kingdom for a horse, a horse, is a prince of celluloid. And he didn't have to kill anybody to get there. Earlier this year, Ian McKellen scored a critical bull's-eye with his Hitlerian interpretation of the real-life 15th-century English ruler - who will be celebrated here at the annual convention of the U.S. branch of the Richard III Society this weekend - in a brawling film adaptation of the Shakespeare drama, (The Life and Death of King)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 28, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
John H. Richards III, 71, of Bryn Mawr, a Philadelphia businessman and sportsman, died of lung cancer on Monday, April 21, at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Richards grew up in Villanova, attended the Haverford School, and earned his degree in chemical engineering from Bucknell University in 1966. An avid sportsman, Mr. Richards grew up foxhunting, said his son, Bradley N., and later in life enjoyed spending time at his cabin in Eagles Mere, Pa. An accomplished equestrian, fly fisherman, and beagler, Mr. Richards was a member of the Rose Tree Foxhunt, Broadacers Anglers Club and the Ardrossan Beagles, where he served as joint master.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
THERE ARE certain signs that annually crop up in this neck of the woods that let us know spring is nigh. For some, it's the botanical bacchanal that is the Philadelphia Flower Show. For others, it's the commencement of the Phillies' spring training camp in Clearwater, Fla. And, in local theater circles, it's the annual presentation of a William Shakespeare play by Center City's Lantern Theater. For a decade, the troupe, headquartered at St. Stephen's Theater, has staged a play of the Bard's as spring blooms.
NEWS
February 6, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
He never got that horse. Richard III, that is. In Act 5, Scene 4, of Shakespeare's Tragedy of King Richard the Third , it's all going south for the hunchback murderer-king, but he defies fate to the last. "A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse," he cries. Turns out he probably did die on his feet, no helmet, cut down by various medieval weapons. Archaeologists, historians, and other experts at the University of Leicester told the world Monday: The bones of Richard III, last Plantagenet king, last English king to die in battle, and delectably admirable Shakespearean villain-hero   , have been found.
NEWS
February 5, 2013
LEICESTER, ENGLAND - He was king of England, but for centuries he lay without shroud or coffin in an unknown grave, and his name became a byword for villainy. On Monday, scientists announced that they had rescued the remains of Richard III from anonymity. The monarch's fans hope a revival of his reputation will soon follow. In a dramatically orchestrated news conference, a team of scientists from the University of Leicester announced that tests had proved what they scarcely dared to hope - that a scarred and broken skeleton unearthed under a drab municipal parking lot was that of the 15th-century king, the last English monarch to die in battle.
NEWS
November 4, 2011 | BY JEFF JANICZEK, janiczj@phillynews.com
Central wide receiver Richard Drayton III has continued his family tradition this season. The 6-1, 210-pound senior is the son of Rich Drayton, the former Central standout who is now the school's head coach. Known as "Tre" in the family, Drayton III is waiting until after the season to make a college commitment. This week, we sat down with the elite receiver: Q: What kind of receiver do you consider yourself? A: "I think I'm a possession receiver. I catch basically anything that gets thrown my way. " Q: Who's your favorite professional athlete?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
Who is killing the royal members of Britain's House of Plantagenet? According to Shakespeare's murder-laden Richard III , in free performances this month by the Commonwealth Classic Theatre Company at parks across the region, it's the title character himself. With the help of hit men, of course. History is not so certain; Richard, who ruled for two years in the late 1400s and endowed King's College of Cambridge, may have been responsible for the murders of the two young princes who were ahead of him in the line of succession, and may have helped deal similarly with several other relatives - but may have doesn't make a good Elizabethan play.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
Somehow Shakespeare became synonymous with summer, probably because of the growth nationally of Shakespeare festivals in off-season months. Looking to get your fix of the Bard? It's not hard to find "a stage where every man must play a part. " The Comedy of Errors. Two sets of identical twins are separated at birth - wow, that guy took risks with plot credibility. This is one of his earliest plays, going on Wednesday through July 17 at the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival at DeSales University, near Allentown.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2010 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Quintessence Theatre Group has big ambitions: "adaptation of epic works of drama and classic literature," and restoring Mount Airy's Sedgwick Theater to its rightful place "as a jewel in Philadelphia's cultural landscape. " The fledgling company embarks on its grand effort with co-founder Alexander Burns directing Measure for Measure, Shakespeare's darkest comedy, and a particularly problematic problem play. At its heart, however, this is still a comedy, complete with all the identity-switching one can expect from such Elizabethan follies.
NEWS
June 8, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles Richard "Dick" Arenschield III, 70, of Center City, a bottling-industry consultant, died of complications from leukemia Tuesday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Mr. Arenschield grew up in Radnor. He graduated from Staunton (Va.) Military Academy, and attended the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania while working for the Schmidt's brewery, founded by his great-great-grandfather Christian Schmidt in 1860. By his early 20s, Mr. Arenschield was a brewmaster, and he later became vice president of marketing.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|