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Richard Neal

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NEWS
August 21, 1992
Looking confident and reasonably fit for a big man, Richard Neal, the city's new police chief, seemed to live up to his billing as a personable leader with good instincts for soothing both internal police frictions and community conflicts during a press conference yesterday. We wish him well, and take heart in the encouraging comments made by former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Willie Williams, now police chief in Los Angeles, who had hoped Mr. Neal would get the job. The new commissioner, according to Mr. Williams, "will make the tough calls when he needs to. " As an example, Mr. Williams credited his former chief inspector for making the police internal affairs bureau much more responsive in handling complaints against officers.
NEWS
August 21, 1992 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Standing 6-foot-2 and weighing over 220 pounds, Richard Neal is the kind of person who can fill a room just by entering it. But it's more than size that makes him impressive. "Rich Neal has something that I would call presence," City Councilman Michael A. Nutter said about Philadelphia's new police commissioner. "If he sits in a meeting, if he sits in a room, it's not just his physical size, I think it's his personality. He's paying attention and he's engaged in what's going on. " It was these qualities - his willingness to listen, his personality, his intelligence - all the traits that add up to the word "presence" that Mayor Rendell cited yesterday in officially naming Neal, 52, commissioner.
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
The search panel looking for a new police commissioner has narrowed its list to nine candidates, and former District Attorney Ron Castille failed to make the cut. "I wasn't expecting too much," Castille said when told of his elimination by a reporter yesterday. "I didn't clean out my desk. " The group still in the running to succeed former Commissioner Willie L. Williams includes five candidates from within the department, two from elsewhere in the Rendell administration, and two out-of-towners who are former Philadelphians.
NEWS
October 24, 1992 | by Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writer
Richard Neal doesn't like to hear the name "Badlands. " The police commissioner, who at his swearing-in six weeks ago declared the fight against drugs one of his chief priorities and decried the nickname some cops have given to a drug-ridden section of North Philadelphia, yesterday took one of the steps he hopes will lead to the eradication of that name. He announced that a select group of 40 experienced police officers would be transferred to narcotics, beginning Monday. The 40 officers, Neal said, have been working in divisions throughout the city and either asked for the transfer or were recommended by their commanding officers.
NEWS
June 20, 2008 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SEPTA transit police overwhelmingly ratified a new four-year contract yesterday, formally ending a long-running contract dispute that prompted a brief strike last weekend. After having rejected three earlier tentative agreements, members of the Fraternal Order of Transit Police (FOTP) voted 133-9 to approve the latest agreement. The contract provides for 3 percent annual pay increases, an increase in "longevity" pay, a 1 percent-of-pay contribution by police to their health-insurance coverage, a $270,000 increase in payments to survivors of an officer killed in the line of duty, and an increase in officers' pensions.
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Staff Writer This story contains information from the Associated Press
Deputy Police Commissioner Alan Lewis is once again in line for a chance to run a big-city police department. Lewis, one of five candidates considered to replace former Police Commissioner Willie L. Williams, is a finalist to succeed retiring Washington, D.C., Police Chief Isaac Fulwood Jr. Philadelphia Police Department spokeswoman Sgt. Theresa Young confirmed that Lewis was among seven contenders - four of them D.C. police officials and...
NEWS
July 24, 1993 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Al Lewis' light shone brighter than ever yesterday. The deputy Philadelphia police commissioner, a 28-year law-enforcement veteran whom President Bush once named among his thousand points of light, was picked to become the next United States Marshal for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. U.S. Sen. Harris Wofford announced that he had recommended to President Clinton that Lewis be appointed to the $79,931-a-year job, which requires Senate confirmation. "I'm quite honored and very privileged to have the opportunity to assume this position," said Lewis, a native of South Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | by Regina Medina, and Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writers
An African-American police officer with the 24th District has allegedly confessed to selling the controversial "Welcome, America" T-shirts that seemed to celebrate the highly publicized arrest of carjacking suspect Thomas Jones, a high-ranking police source said. Kenyatta Lee, a patrol officer at the district, will be transferred to a desk job at the Differential Police Response. Lee will be at the DPR - which handles minor police complaints to police on the telephone - until the investigation is over, the source said.
NEWS
October 11, 2002
HAS MAYOR STREET learned nothing from the missteps of the Rendell administration? Back in 1997, when he was mayor and Richard Neal was police commissioner, Rendell dramatically appeared at a crime-fighting conference hosted by state legislators concerned about Philadelphia's mounting crime problem. During that meeting, Rendell tried to silence his critics by claiming that crime dropped 17 percent during the first six months of the year. Rendell was forced to eat those words when the Daily News revealed those police statistics were essentially bogus.
NEWS
July 12, 1998 | By Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three police officers who were acquitted of corruption charges and put back on the force by a labor arbitrator will not be allowed to carry guns or wear badges for the foreseeable future. Police Commissioner John Timoney said Friday that he ordered the three officers to work desk jobs at police headquarters because of concerns about their credibility. The concerns were expressed especially by Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne Abraham and U.S. Attorney Michael Stiles. Officers Edward A. Greene, Lester F. Johnson and John P. O'Hanlon were acquitted in 1996 of charges that they took $28,000 at gunpoint from bettors at an illegal North Philadelphia cockfight in 1994.
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NEWS
March 22, 2012 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA'S 219 unionized transit cops went on strike at 2 p.m. Wednesday, just 20 minutes after their final offer was rejected at a bargaining session. SEPTA declined to discuss numbers, but Richard Neal Jr., president of the Fraternal Order of Transit Police, said his union was striking over a "measly" 50-cent hourly raise for mandatory recertification training required of all police officers. That raise would cost SEPTA $200,000 a year, Neal said. SEPTA's final offer of 15 cents an hour was "an insult," he said.
NEWS
June 20, 2008 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SEPTA transit police overwhelmingly ratified a new four-year contract yesterday, formally ending a long-running contract dispute that prompted a brief strike last weekend. After having rejected three earlier tentative agreements, members of the Fraternal Order of Transit Police (FOTP) voted 133-9 to approve the latest agreement. The contract provides for 3 percent annual pay increases, an increase in "longevity" pay, a 1 percent-of-pay contribution by police to their health-insurance coverage, a $270,000 increase in payments to survivors of an officer killed in the line of duty, and an increase in officers' pensions.
NEWS
June 11, 2008 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SEPTA's transit police will go on strike at 2 p.m. tomorrow if no settlement is reached in their long-running contract dispute, union officials said yesterday. If the approximately 200 transit police strike, SEPTA will rely on agency supervisors, Philadelphia police officers, and private security guards to protect riders, SEPTA officials said. "We believe we will have essentially the same level of protection as we have now," SEPTA spokesman Richard Maloney said. But transit police union leaders urged passengers to stay off SEPTA for their own protection.
NEWS
May 18, 2008 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amid increased fears about rider safety, SEPTA transit police are threatening to strike because of a long-standing impasse over wages. Officials from SEPTA and the Fraternal Order of Transit Police are to meet with a state mediator Thursday to try to resolve their differences. If no progress is made, "a strike could come at any time," police union president Richard Neal Jr. said. If transit police strike, SEPTA will rely on private security guards and Philadelphia police officers to protect riders, agency officials said.
NEWS
November 2, 2007
The senseless murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Chuck Cassidy - along with two other recent shootings of officers - further demonstrates just how devastating gun violence in this city has become. There's an earned perception that ruthless criminals and not the Police Department are running the streets. That perception is bolstered when officers start getting shot at an alarming rate, and dying in the line of duty. Our hearts go out to the family of Officer Cassidy, who died yesterday after being shot Wednesday as he walked into a West Oak Lane coffee shop while an armed robbery was under way. The slain policeman leaves behind a wife and three children.
NEWS
November 23, 2005 | By Harold Jackson
On a cold, rainy Tuesday at Eighth and Butler Streets in North Philadelphia, the only cash transactions occurring are for food and sundries inside Garcia's Grocery. That wasn't always the case. This cozy corner once hosted one of the city's busiest open-air drug markets. That Eighth and Butler is quiet now, even on sunny days and moonlit nights, makes Police Commissioner Sylvester Johnson smile. In his office he keeps an old VHS tape of a 1997 City Council meeting in which then-Commissioner Richard Neal is being questioned intensely about this very same corner.
NEWS
May 8, 2005 | By L. Stuart Ditzen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Police Department has changed in many ways since the MOVE siege in 1985, and it is widely viewed today, even by critics, as better run, more professional and more accountable. "Far from perfect," said David Rudovsky, a civil-rights lawyer who has battled to reform police abuses for a quarter century. "But much better than it was. " And much of that improvement can be tied to reforms set in motion by the siege and its aftermath. There have been huge advances in the use of computers, new policies on the use of force and weapons, aggressive efforts to weed out corruption in the ranks, increased scrutiny of police conduct, and a dramatic rise in the number of women and minorities in command positions and in the ranks.
NEWS
September 10, 2004 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The management ranks of the Police Department will be reduced - probably by attrition - to pay the cost of a new labor contract granted officers last month, Mayor Street said yesterday. The city has 6,870 police officers, of whom 140 are at the rank of captain or above, according to city officials. Historically, Philadelphia has had a higher ratio of commanders to officers than any other major city in the nation, though the number has dipped in recent years because of retirements.
NEWS
April 13, 2003 | By Mark Fazlollah INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it comes to police commanders, Philadelphia is the national leader with more brass per officer than any other major city. Its 168 commanders - captains or higher - are more than Los Angeles' and Houston's numbers combined. That disparity will only grow, at least temporarily, now that Police Commissioner Sylvester M. Johnson is seeking to promote an additional 32 commanders in anticipation of, he says, future retirements in the command ranks. Every new commander costs each city taxpayers about $10,000 more a year because of higher salaries.
NEWS
February 2, 2003 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"You want it, I got it. " That was Patrick "Dewey" Smith Sr.'s philosophy; it earned him more money than an orphan from Kensington could ever dream of and a reputation as the head of one of the region's largest stolen-vehicle and hot-parts networks. And one more thing: The jail cell he now occupies. "I'm pretty well-known," he said in a telephone interview from the Camden County Jail. "I've been doing it so long. " Smith's success at stealing and dismantling cars forced the Philadelphia Police Department to get serious about vehicle theft.
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