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Richard Pryor

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NEWS
December 14, 2005 | By STANLEY CROUCH
ON SATURDAY, Richard Pryor left this life and bequeathed to our culture as much darkness as he did the light his extraordinary talent made possible. When we look at the remarkable descent this culture has made into smut, contempt, vulgarity and the pornographic, those of us who are not willing to drink the Kool-Aid marked "all's well" will have to address the fact that it was the combination of confusion and comic genius that made Pryor a much more negative influence than a positive one. I do not mean positive in the way Bill Cosby was when his TV show redefined situation comedy by turning away from all the stereotypes of disorder and incompetence that were then and still are the basic renditions of black American life in our mass media.
NEWS
March 7, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Moving is a movie that takes Richard Pryor in the wrong direction. To find a similar misjudgment in his wildly erratic career, we have to go back to The Toy (1982), in which he was asked to walk without his usual shtick and tell a rotten rich kid about the meaning of love and the need to respect women. Fans who had just seen him in the undiluted concert movie Richard Pryor: Live on the Sunset Strip promptly assumed that The Toy's PG rating stood for "Pryor Gagged. " Moving, an aimless comedy about the travails of a family transferring its worldly possessions across the country, comes with an R rating for a few four- letter curses.
NEWS
January 17, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Critical Condition is a film that puts Richard Pryor's vast talent on the disabled list. Michael Apted's comedy is set in a hospital during a power blackout, and there has been a similar drain on the raucous and raunchy energy we expect from Pryor. In much the same way that Eddie Murphy tones down his act for The Golden Child, Critical Condition serves up what you might call restrained Pryor. The effect of this dilution is akin to ordering a shot of whiskey in a bar and having to settle for a white-wine spritzer.
NEWS
December 13, 2005
The great comics, said Richard Pryor, "all have a hole in their chest where their heart should be. Somebody yanked their heart out when they were kids, and they've been spending their whole lives trying to fill that hole. " In the foreword for Made You Laugh!, Joe Garner's retrospective on comedy in America, Pryor said "the only thing that could numb that hole in my chest" was laughter. His medicine was good for the rest of us, too. Pryor, who died Saturday at age 65, used humor to touch people in ways they didn't expect.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you're in your 40s or older, you probably have a good idea of what Richard Pryor used to do. You might have thought the groundbreaking comedian was funny. You might have been shocked. But you definitely took notice. If you're, say, in your mid-30s, you might also remember his routines. You might have seen him on Saturday Night Live. You might have circulated his old tapes, samizdat-style, and laughed hysterically into your pillow, hoping that Mom or Dad wouldn't figure out what you were doing.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The 19th-century British statesman Disraeli once observed, "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics. " And the sad truth is the box-office stats from the previous collaborations of Richard Pryor and Gene Wilder dictated another outing. It's called Another You, and it's even about liars and a con game involving millions of dollars. You may wish to immediately consider another film because whatever modest chemistry - perhaps the most abused word in the film business - existed in Silver Streak, Stir Crazy and See No Evil, Hear No Evil has evaporated to below the level of formula in Another You. In the last few years, Pryor has been valiantly battling an assortment of health problems, which presumably were a factor in his manful but subdued contribution to his fourth misadventure (in more than one sense)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1986 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Richard Pryor's raucously funny semi-autobiography, Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is Calling, ranks with those legendary epics of show-biz high life and self- destructive low life, Lenny and All That Jazz. Provocative Pryor co-wrote, produced, directed and stars in this account of a celebrated stand-up comic and Hollywood personality in critical condition after a drug-related flash fire chars his upper body and face. Swathed in gauze in the burn ward intensive care unit, mummylike Jo Jo wonders, "What am I doing here?"
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The setting was a private party in a plush, mahogany-paneled banquet room several stories above the Potomac, and a roomful of people with money and titles were paying homage to Richard Pryor. Was this the mother of all ironies? Pryor, arguably the greatest American comedian of the 20th century - a vulgar, drug- and sex-obsessed storyteller who painted brilliant images that depended heavily on the f-word and the n-word - was being honored in late October by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, a bastion of establishment aesthetics.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
GLENDALE, CALIF. - "Make Me Laugh" comic Vic Dunlop has died in California of diabetes complications at 62. The irreverent comic joked about his weight, Catholic-school upbringing and Army life. He gained national attention on television's "Make Me Laugh. " He was a regular on Richard Pryor's 1977 comedy-variety show and appeared on the 1980s comedy "Harper Valley P.T.A. "
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Filmmakers from Richard Linklater to David Gordon Green to Whoopi Goldberg are bringing films to this year's Tribeca Film Festival. The New York festival announced the second half of its 89-film slate Wednesday, all in various out-of-competition sections. Some of the films, like Linklater's "Before Midnight" and Green's "Prince Avalanche," will be continuing on the festival circuit after premiering at the Sundance Film Festival. Others, like Goldberg's documentary, "I Got Somethin' to Tell You," about the comedian Moms Mabley, will be showing for the first time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
At 33, Detroit's Danny Brown has become as notorious for sexual antics onstage and for self-admitted drug use as for his lewd, crude, yet smartly penned brand of electro-rap that manifested itself best on his most recent albums, XXX (2011) and Old (2013). From rapping on a laissez-faire lifestyle in his best tracks to titling himself "the Adderall Admiral," Brown doesn't seem to be a settled down-and-serious guy. Yet he delayed an interview several days to settle on a house just outside Detroit.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Filmmakers from Richard Linklater to David Gordon Green to Whoopi Goldberg are bringing films to this year's Tribeca Film Festival. The New York festival announced the second half of its 89-film slate Wednesday, all in various out-of-competition sections. Some of the films, like Linklater's "Before Midnight" and Green's "Prince Avalanche," will be continuing on the festival circuit after premiering at the Sundance Film Festival. Others, like Goldberg's documentary, "I Got Somethin' to Tell You," about the comedian Moms Mabley, will be showing for the first time.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taylor Swift 's new album, Red , which is out Monday, is a statement, nay a veritable testament , to the young woman's maturation as a person, as an individual, and as an independent soul, says the country-pop star with a thousand ex-boyfriends. The album is "a definitive portrait of how I felt when I finally stopped caring what my ex thought of me," Swift, 22, tells USA Today. But Swift, whose celeb ex-beaus include Joe Jonas , Taylor Lautner , John Mayer , and Jake Gyllenhaal (that's a lot of livin' for one so young)
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
GLENDALE, CALIF. - "Make Me Laugh" comic Vic Dunlop has died in California of diabetes complications at 62. The irreverent comic joked about his weight, Catholic-school upbringing and Army life. He gained national attention on television's "Make Me Laugh. " He was a regular on Richard Pryor's 1977 comedy-variety show and appeared on the 1980s comedy "Harper Valley P.T.A. "
NEWS
January 2, 2009 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State flags at half-staff in his native New York. A full military burial in Cherry Hill, complete with honor guard and rifle salute. Thousands of e-mails from around the world, from Norway to South Africa. John P. Pryor would have hated it. To the beloved leader of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania's trauma team - killed in Iraq by a mortar shell on Christmas Day - all military casualties were equal, according to his brother. "He would think this is profoundly unfair," Richard Pryor said Wednesday, driving to Dover Air Force Base to retrieve his brother's body from the military morgue.
NEWS
December 30, 2008 | By Michael Matza and Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The outpouring of grief by colleagues, friends and even strangers who were shocked by the death in Iraq of John P. Pryor, the passionate leader of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania's trauma team, has been "beyond anything we had expected," his brother said yesterday. The funeral for Pryor, 42, was originally planned for a community church in Moorestown. Because of intense interest, the funeral now is likely to take place Monday at the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul after a viewing Saturday and Sunday near Pryor's home in New Jersey, said his brother, Richard Pryor, 41. John's "humility was unbelievable, because he had no understanding of what his death would mean," said his brother, speaking from the Moorestown home where immediate family gathered.
NEWS
December 14, 2005 | By STANLEY CROUCH
ON SATURDAY, Richard Pryor left this life and bequeathed to our culture as much darkness as he did the light his extraordinary talent made possible. When we look at the remarkable descent this culture has made into smut, contempt, vulgarity and the pornographic, those of us who are not willing to drink the Kool-Aid marked "all's well" will have to address the fact that it was the combination of confusion and comic genius that made Pryor a much more negative influence than a positive one. I do not mean positive in the way Bill Cosby was when his TV show redefined situation comedy by turning away from all the stereotypes of disorder and incompetence that were then and still are the basic renditions of black American life in our mass media.
NEWS
December 13, 2005
The great comics, said Richard Pryor, "all have a hole in their chest where their heart should be. Somebody yanked their heart out when they were kids, and they've been spending their whole lives trying to fill that hole. " In the foreword for Made You Laugh!, Joe Garner's retrospective on comedy in America, Pryor said "the only thing that could numb that hole in my chest" was laughter. His medicine was good for the rest of us, too. Pryor, who died Saturday at age 65, used humor to touch people in ways they didn't expect.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2005 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Rain Pryor is the daughter of comedian Richard Pryor, and her show at the Painted Bride Art Center is autobiographical. But don't go to Fried Chicken and Latkes expecting to learn a great deal about either the personal or professional life of her famous father. The truth is that Richard Pryor, as Rain Pryor readily tells, wasn't much of a father, and judging from what she says about him in the one-woman show, she never got close to the man. The few scenes involving her and her father aren't revealing of the man who she says was more interested in drugs and women (both of which he enjoyed in large amounts)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2005 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Rain Pryor says her father told her to write about what she knew, so she did, even though it meant detailing Dad's penchants for cocaine and hookers - one of whom the young Rain called aunt while being babysat. Pryor's father, you may have surmised, is Richard Pryor, the comedian of the civil-rights era who was known almost as much for his reckless lifestyle as for the sharp-edged social commentary of his monologues. His 35-year-old daughter says she learned something else from him as well.
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