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Richard Whitehead

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NEWS
January 8, 1987 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The husband of Mary Beth Whitehead testified yesterday that his wife cried "hysterically," repeating, "Oh, God, what have I done?" after handing over the child she had borne for another couple. "She would wake up (that night) crying and screaming," said Richard Whitehead, speaking softly. "That's when I told her, 'Go and get our baby.' " Richard Whitehead, 37, described the emotional scene, which occurred on March 30, at the extraordinary trial unfolding in Superior Court here for custody of the girl known as Baby M. A sanitation worker from Bricktown, Ocean County, Richard Whitehead said he realized during the child's birth that he wanted to keep the baby his wife conceived as a surrogate mother.
NEWS
March 3, 1987 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Testifying at the Baby M trial yesterday, a psychiatrist hired by attorneys for William and Elizabeth Stern said that Mary Beth Whitehead has a "mix of personality difficulties" and that her husband, Richard, suffers from "intermittent alcoholism. " The psychiatrist, Dr. Allwyn J. Levine, recommended that the court award custody of the 11-month-old girl to the Sterns, of Tenafly, Bergen County, and also terminate Mary Beth Whitehead's legal rights as the child's mother. The latter step is necessary if Elizabeth Stern is to adopt the child.
NEWS
January 11, 1987 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
When William Stern first called last April, seeking the return of Baby M, attorney Gary N. Skoloff said he told Stern not to worry. "This is going to be simple, clean and fast," Skoloff remembers telling his client, a biochemist from Tenafly, N.J. The bill for legal fees wouldn't amount to more than $1,000, he predicted. Stern, 40, and his wife Elizabeth, 41, had hired a Bricktown, N.J., homemaker to bear a child for them, agreeing to pay her $10,000. Mary Beth Whitehead, 29, the surrogate mother, bore the child - a girl - after being artificially inseminated with Stern's semen.
NEWS
August 5, 1987 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Blaming the pressures of the Baby M case, surrogate mother Mary Beth Whitehead and her husband have separated, which could make it more difficult for her to obtain custody of the girl she bore under a $10,000 contract. Whitehead's attorney announced the separation yesterday in a letter to the New Jersey Supreme Court, which is to hear oral arguments next month in Whitehead's appeal of a lower-court decision awarding the child once known as Baby M to William and Elizabeth Stern.
NEWS
November 13, 1987 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International and Reuters.)
Mary Beth Whitehead was granted an uncontested divorce in New Brunswick, N. J., yesterday from her husband of almost 14 years, Richard Whitehead, as she insisted that they were still "very much" in love and would remain close friends. The surrogate mother sat shoulder-to-shoulder with her ex-husband in the Middlesex County courtroom, talking warmly and joking with reporters. She blamed the divorce on the pressures of dealing with the Baby M case, in which she lost custody of a baby she had agreed to carry for another couple.
NEWS
February 10, 1987 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Mary Beth Whitehead made a courtroom appeal to William and Elizabeth Stern yesterday, asking them to discontinue their custody fight over Baby M. "I love them both," Whitehead said from the witness stand. "I want to put my arms around both of them and tell them we made a mistake. Let's make the best of it. Let's not continue to hurt Sara. " Sara is the name given the baby by Whitehead and her family. The Sterns call the 10-month-old girl Melissa. After Whitehead's testimony, the Sterns told reporters that they had been moved by her emotional appeal, but that they remained undeterred in their fight for the child.
NEWS
November 5, 1987 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Surrogate mother Mary Beth Whitehead confirmed yesterday that she was pregnant and said she intended to marry the baby's father as soon as she could divorce her estranged husband. "When I first learned of my pregnancy, there was no question that I wanted and would have my baby," Whitehead, 30, said in a statement released by her attorney. "The baby's father, Dean Gould, and I have had an ongoing relationship for the past few months. "We intend to be married as soon as Rick and I are divorced.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | New York Daily News
Baby M's mother and her former husband have agreed to accept about $32,000 to drop their suit against the Manhattan agency that handled her surrogate- motherhood contract, it was disclosed yesterday. Manhattan Federal Judge Pierre Leval signed a settlement order Monday. "She's happy about the settlement," Joel Siegal, who represents Mary Beth Whitehead-Gould, said. "She feels that it will deter people from engaging in the surrogate process. " Whitehead-Gould and her former husband, Richard Whitehead, sued the Infertility Center of New York, its founder Noel Keane, two lawyers involved in the case and the physician who performed the artificial insemination.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Mary Beth Whitehead has told a psychiatrist retained by her attorneys that her husband goes on two-week drinking binges about every six months, according to the psychiatrist's report. The report of Dr. Donald F. Klein of New York, which was submitted to the judge hearing the Baby M case, states that Richard Whitehead, 37, "is essentially out of it, rather than aggressively dangerous" during these drinking periods. The Whiteheads, of Bricktown, Ocean County, are seeking custody of Baby M, the child Mary Beth Whitehead agreed to bear for another couple, William and Elizabeth Stern of Tenafly, Bergen County.
NEWS
January 13, 1987 | BY LINDA WRIGHT AVERY
This is America, and a deal is a deal. Plain and simple. Unless there's something super-precious - more valuable than long green - up for barter. Something like a human being. You thought the practice of selling people went out with abolition of slavery and the 13th Amendment? Wrong. Now we've got surrogate motherhood, which masquerades as an altruistic, humane and reasonable alternative for infertile couples who want children. That's how it was supposed to be in the case of Baby M, who was born to Mary Beth Whitehead of Bricktown, N. J., March 27, under a surrogate mother contract agreement with William and Elizabeth Stern of Tenafly.
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NEWS
June 1, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investigators in Montgomery County have arrested a Bucks County man who they say contacted a 12-year-old Lower Salford Township girl online early in May to arrange a meeting for sex. Richard Whitehead, 28, of the 100 block of Hughes Avenue, Sellersville, was taken into custody by detectives May 24, when he appeared at an abandoned bunker in a densely wooded area in Lenape Park, Bucks County, officials announced Tuesday. The bunker was to have been the meeting place for the two, but the girl was not there, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1989 | By Barbara Beck, Daily News Staff Writer
The world's most notorious surrogate mother is about to become this week's most famous author. Mary Beth Whitehead-Gould, pregnant with her fifth child, today visits Philadelphia on the beginning of a 22-city promotional tour for her book, "A Mother's Story: The Truth About the Baby M Case" (St. Martin's Press, $17.95). Already in the bookstores with a 100,000-copy first printing, it's a main selection of the Doubleday Book Club, an alternate selection of the Literary Guild and will be serialized in Family Circle magazine.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | New York Daily News
Baby M's mother and her former husband have agreed to accept about $32,000 to drop their suit against the Manhattan agency that handled her surrogate- motherhood contract, it was disclosed yesterday. Manhattan Federal Judge Pierre Leval signed a settlement order Monday. "She's happy about the settlement," Joel Siegal, who represents Mary Beth Whitehead-Gould, said. "She feels that it will deter people from engaging in the surrogate process. " Whitehead-Gould and her former husband, Richard Whitehead, sued the Infertility Center of New York, its founder Noel Keane, two lawyers involved in the case and the physician who performed the artificial insemination.
NEWS
November 30, 1987 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer (Inquirer wire services contributed to this article.)
Mary Beth Whitehead, the surrogate mother of Baby M, was married this weekend to the father of her unborn child, two weeks after her divorce from her first husband. In a civil ceremony Saturday afternoon, Whitehead, 30, married New York accountant Dean Gould, 27, at the Rahway, N.J., home of Elizabeth Karcher, daughter of Assembly Minority Leader Alan J. Karcher (D., Middlesex). Lawyers involved with the Whitehead case confirmed that the wedding took place, but declined to give details.
NEWS
November 13, 1987 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International and Reuters.)
Mary Beth Whitehead was granted an uncontested divorce in New Brunswick, N. J., yesterday from her husband of almost 14 years, Richard Whitehead, as she insisted that they were still "very much" in love and would remain close friends. The surrogate mother sat shoulder-to-shoulder with her ex-husband in the Middlesex County courtroom, talking warmly and joking with reporters. She blamed the divorce on the pressures of dealing with the Baby M case, in which she lost custody of a baby she had agreed to carry for another couple.
NEWS
November 5, 1987 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Surrogate mother Mary Beth Whitehead confirmed yesterday that she was pregnant and said she intended to marry the baby's father as soon as she could divorce her estranged husband. "When I first learned of my pregnancy, there was no question that I wanted and would have my baby," Whitehead, 30, said in a statement released by her attorney. "The baby's father, Dean Gould, and I have had an ongoing relationship for the past few months. "We intend to be married as soon as Rick and I are divorced.
NEWS
August 5, 1987 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Blaming the pressures of the Baby M case, surrogate mother Mary Beth Whitehead and her husband have separated, which could make it more difficult for her to obtain custody of the girl she bore under a $10,000 contract. Whitehead's attorney announced the separation yesterday in a letter to the New Jersey Supreme Court, which is to hear oral arguments next month in Whitehead's appeal of a lower-court decision awarding the child once known as Baby M to William and Elizabeth Stern.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The following is a chronology of events in the custody fight over Baby M: March 30, 1984 - Mary Beth Whitehead applies to the Infertility Center of New York (ICNY) to become a surrogate mother, stating that she wants "other human beings to experience the gift of life and the joys of parenthood. " April 26, 1984 - A psychological report completed for ICNY concludes that Whitehead "may have more needs to have another child than she is admitting. " Nevertheless, the psychologist recommends Whitehead as "an appropriate candidate" for surrogate motherhood.
NEWS
March 13, 1987 | By KURT HEINE, Daily News Staff Writer
Tears streamed down the face of Baby M's natural mother yesterday as her lawyer told how she irons her 12-year-old son's T-shirts, blow-dries her 11- year-old daughter's hair and loves the 11-month-old child she bore for another couple "too much. " As lawyers presented closing arguments in the landmark case of a soured surrogate-mother contract, Mary Beth Whitehead was portrayed as a working- class victim of an affluent couple's quest for convenient parenthood. The result, said lawyer Harold J. Cassidy in a summation that attacked surrogate-parenting as immoral, was Baby M, now a chubby little girl who is learning to walk and beginning to say "Mama" and "Dada.
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