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Richard Williams

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SPORTS
November 7, 2004 | By Nikki Usher INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At Tuesday's match between Venus Williams and hometown hero Lisa Raymond at the Advanta Championships, the loud baritone of Richard Williams could be heard between every point. Though the match was a cakewalk for Venus, 6-2, 6-1, Richard Williams yelled out encouragement before each point from the box seats at the Pavilion at Villanova University. "V, serve like oil! Remember that!" or "V, let's go!" or "Take her home!" And sometimes, like the controversial figure that he is, he aggravated the hometown fans: "Go home, Lisa.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2014
THE STORY of how Venus and Serena Williams' father fought off drug dealers so that he could train his daughters on decrepit, drug-infested tennis courts in Compton, Calif., is almost legendary. But what do we really know about Richard Williams, the man? At 72, he's a controversial figure in the world of tennis. Now he has a new book, Black and White: The Way I See It , that shares his life story as well as tips on raising successful children. But don't buy it thinking it's a tell-all.
NEWS
November 10, 1997 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Open finalist, a tall, regal 17-year-old with braces on her teeth, has just finished an early-morning practice with her 16-year-old sister. There are giggles galore and some disagreement about who will go to the vending machine for a candy bar when the imposing man with the deep voice, the backward baseball cap, and the eyes that see everything stops them cold. "Pick up those tennis balls," Richard Williams says, waving a hand at the two dozen scattered balls. Venus Williams, the elder sister, the one who charmed America and made it to the finals of her first U.S. Open in September, rolls her eyes and seems ready to make some smart-mouthed, teenage comment.
NEWS
August 5, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
The driver of a tractor-trailer involved in a fatal accident that killed a Levittown woman and two of her children and injured two others has been charged with three counts of death by automobile, the Mercer County Prosecutor's Office said Saturday. Richard Williams, 45, of Brooklyn, N.Y., was driving the rig about 6:30 p.m. Friday near the intersection of Brunswick Pike and Darrah Lane in Lawrence Township when he made an illegal U-turn, authorities said. The tractor-trailer collided with a southbound Chevrolet Tahoe driven by Shaqwan Tisdale, 25. Jamella Tisdale, 25, was killed along with Javeon Durante, 9, and 3-month-old Jaden Tisdale, prosecutors said.
SPORTS
July 7, 2000 | By Ashley McGeachy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It can be torturous existing in the shadow of elder siblings. They do everything in life first - go to school, drive, date, grow up. Usually. Last September, Serena Williams threw her family's karma off kilter by overstepping older sister Venus in the quest for a Grand Slam tennis title. Fifteen months Venus' junior, Serena won the U.S. Open with her admittedly bitter sister watching. Yesterday, the pendulum swung back and order was restored. Venus Williams beat Serena Williams on the grandest stage in tennis - Centre Court at Wimbledon.
SPORTS
September 5, 1997 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
They are the stories of the U.S. Open: two teenagers whose tennis skills and personalities have relegated the men's draw to off-Broadway status. One, Martina Hingis, has already won two Grand Slam tournament titles this year. The other, Venus Williams, is playing in her first Grand Slam semifinal today. She'll appear in many more. Hingis, established as the No. 1 player in the world at 16, dismisses opponents almost effortlessly. She has not dropped a set in the Open on her way to today's semifinal against sixth-seeded Lindsay Davenport.
SPORTS
September 12, 1999 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ball landed long and Serena Williams could not move. Her legs buckled, her arms fell to her side, one hand rose to her heart. "Oh, my God," she gasped. "I won. " Late yesterday afternoon, the powerful 17-year-old from Compton, Calif., won the U.S. Open when she beat top-seeded Martina Hingis in an emotional second-set tiebreaker. In winning, 6-3, 7-6 (7-4), she became the first African American U.S. Open winner since 1968, when Arthur Ashe - for whom the giant stadium in which she won is named - captured the first U.S. Open title in the open era. She is the first black woman to win the Open since Althea Gibson in 1958, the first of her race to win any major since Ashe in 1975.
NEWS
May 3, 1992 | By Mike Capuzzo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once upon a time, there was a little girl not much taller than a tennis racket. She was 4 years old, living in one of the worst ghettos of Los Angeles, when her father took her to the local court to teach her the game. The first rule of playing the gentle sport of ace, deuce and love, the father said, was to hit the ground crawling when the drive-by shooting started. Gang members beat up the father and screamed, "What are you doing here? Do you value your life!" Drug deals punctuated the serves; random gunshots flew across the nets.
SPORTS
March 27, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The father of Venus and Serena Williams says the jeers directed at his family during a tournament last week in Indian Wells, Calif., were racially motivated. Richard Williams made the allegations at the Ericsson Open in Key Biscayne, Fla., where his daughters reached the quarterfinals yesterday. The crowd jeered the family March 17 after Venus pulled out of her semifinal with Serena, citing knee tendinitis. The withdrawal sparked a new round of speculation that the result of matches between the sisters is predetermined by their father, which the family denies.
SPORTS
July 10, 2000 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
People don't have to be tennis fans to know how significant Venus Williams' conquering of Wimbledon is. Williams' 6-3, 7-6 (7-3) dethroning of Lindsay Davenport in an all-American final on Saturday was historic for several reasons: Venus is the first African-American woman since Althea Gibson in 1958 to win a Wimbledon title. Venus and Serena become first sisters to earn Grand Slam tournament titles. Serena is the defending U.S. Open champion. Fifth-seeded Venus was the lowest seed of any female player to win Wimbledon since No. 8 Karen Hantze Susman won in 1962.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2014
THE STORY of how Venus and Serena Williams' father fought off drug dealers so that he could train his daughters on decrepit, drug-infested tennis courts in Compton, Calif., is almost legendary. But what do we really know about Richard Williams, the man? At 72, he's a controversial figure in the world of tennis. Now he has a new book, Black and White: The Way I See It , that shares his life story as well as tips on raising successful children. But don't buy it thinking it's a tell-all.
NEWS
August 5, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
The driver of a tractor-trailer involved in a fatal accident that killed a Levittown woman and two of her children and injured two others has been charged with three counts of death by automobile, the Mercer County Prosecutor's Office said Saturday. Richard Williams, 45, of Brooklyn, N.Y., was driving the rig about 6:30 p.m. Friday near the intersection of Brunswick Pike and Darrah Lane in Lawrence Township when he made an illegal U-turn, authorities said. The tractor-trailer collided with a southbound Chevrolet Tahoe driven by Shaqwan Tisdale, 25. Jamella Tisdale, 25, was killed along with Javeon Durante, 9, and 3-month-old Jaden Tisdale, prosecutors said.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are two beer distributors in Dennis Appleby and Tim Mayfield's South Philadelphia neighborhood, and two liquor stores nearby, as well. That might sound convenient for the friends, who record podcasts on professional wrestling from the 1980s and 1990s. But not if you want to buy vodka on a Sunday. "They're always closed," Appleby, 31, said of the liquor stores. In preparation for their evening recording session, he and Mayfield, 27, trekked Sunday afternoon to the State Store at 12th and Chestnut Streets.
SPORTS
July 5, 2012 | By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press
WIMBLEDON, England - Thanks to a bit of advice from her big sister and a bunch of aces from her big serve, Serena Williams is back in the Wimbledon semifinals. With two more victories, Williams will be holding a Grand Slam trophy for the first time in two years. As the thud of racket against ball reverberated under the closed Centre Court roof, Williams smacked 13 aces at up to 120 m.p.h. and overpowered defending champion Petra Kvitova, 6-3, 7-5, in the quarterfinals Tuesday at the All England Club.
SPORTS
November 7, 2004 | By Nikki Usher INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At Tuesday's match between Venus Williams and hometown hero Lisa Raymond at the Advanta Championships, the loud baritone of Richard Williams could be heard between every point. Though the match was a cakewalk for Venus, 6-2, 6-1, Richard Williams yelled out encouragement before each point from the box seats at the Pavilion at Villanova University. "V, serve like oil! Remember that!" or "V, let's go!" or "Take her home!" And sometimes, like the controversial figure that he is, he aggravated the hometown fans: "Go home, Lisa.
SPORTS
March 27, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The father of Venus and Serena Williams says the jeers directed at his family during a tournament last week in Indian Wells, Calif., were racially motivated. Richard Williams made the allegations at the Ericsson Open in Key Biscayne, Fla., where his daughters reached the quarterfinals yesterday. The crowd jeered the family March 17 after Venus pulled out of her semifinal with Serena, citing knee tendinitis. The withdrawal sparked a new round of speculation that the result of matches between the sisters is predetermined by their father, which the family denies.
NEWS
July 12, 2000 | By Claude Lewis
Nearly 45 years ago, world heavyweight boxing champion Floyd Patterson performed one of the most offensive acts in the long and gory history of boxing: After knocking Pete Rademacher to the canvas, Patterson gently bent over to help the fighter back to his feet. Venus Williams, 20, didn't go quite that far in winning the semifinals against her sister Serena, 18, at Wimbledon last week. In the mind of the public, their semifinals had taken on the aura of a prizefight. But to the two sisters it had always been a family affair.
SPORTS
July 10, 2000 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
People don't have to be tennis fans to know how significant Venus Williams' conquering of Wimbledon is. Williams' 6-3, 7-6 (7-3) dethroning of Lindsay Davenport in an all-American final on Saturday was historic for several reasons: Venus is the first African-American woman since Althea Gibson in 1958 to win a Wimbledon title. Venus and Serena become first sisters to earn Grand Slam tournament titles. Serena is the defending U.S. Open champion. Fifth-seeded Venus was the lowest seed of any female player to win Wimbledon since No. 8 Karen Hantze Susman won in 1962.
NEWS
July 9, 2000
Love-love: Two sisters change the face of tennis It was an impossible task. On the grandest stage in tennis, two sisters, best friends and roommates, were forced to play for a spot in the Wimbledon final. Venus and Serena, the sisters Williams, the future of tennis, a duo as intriguing as Tiger Woods, played each other Thursday for just the fifth time in their brief professional careers. It was an awkward experience. The polite crowd at the pristine All England Club seemed befuddled, not knowing when to clap or whom to support.
SPORTS
July 8, 2000 | By Ashley McGeachy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The patriarch is as popular as the progeny. Richard Williams, father to tennis' hottest tandem, attracts children and octogenarians, white and black, Americans and foreigners. After his daughters Venus and Serena blew through yet another doubles match at Wimbledon yesterday, Richard, wearing Levi's, a blue hat and a red jacket, so captivated a swarm of autograph-seekers that no one noticed when Lindsay Davenport strode by. Lindsay Davenport, the defending Wimbledon champion. It was as if Richard Williams, standing a few feet from Centre Court, cast a spell on the crowd.
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