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Richard Wright

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NEWS
May 27, 1993 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Florio yesterday named a new chief of staff to replace Joseph C. Salema, who resigned this week amid a federal investigation into a securities company that he co-owns. The new chief of staff - Florio's third in less than four years - is Richard Wright, who had been serving as associate state treasurer. He said he was offered the job on Sunday and started work yesterday. But while he is meant to help quell the controversy surrounding Salema, Wright brings his own problems because of his involvement in a state lease deal with Assemblyman Wayne Bryant, a Camden County Democrat.
NEWS
June 22, 1998 | By Laura Barnhardt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Richard Wright Jr., a 20-year-old Pottstown man, was killed in December - allegedly stabbed to death over a cheap bottle of rum. But lying in a pool of blood on the back porch of a Pottstown rowhouse before he died, authorities said, Wright identified his attacker as Gary R. Melendez, a 30-year-old local who now is on trial in Montgomery County Court for murder. Witnesses at the house that December night testified that they were partying with loud music, marijuana and alcohol and that they saw the two men fight over who owned a bottle of Bacardi rum. And Michael Cross, who at one time lived in the house, testified Friday that he tried to break up the brawl of slamming fists and hurling bodies.
LIVING
February 18, 1999 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the character Bigger Thomas, he created doom, an enraged, misunderstood black man who smothers a white woman to death in the chilling classic, Native Son. But he also has created hope: As my anger ebbs, The spring stars grow bright again And the wind returns. He wrote of youthful pain and coming of age under the threatening eye of Jim Crow in his moving autobiography, Black Boy. But he's also written of youthful innocence: A little girl stares, Dewy eyes round with wonder, At morning glories.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A father who police say was stabbed in the chest by his teenage son offered forgiveness yesterday when the two met for the first time since the clash a month ago. "I love him," said Richard Wright, 40, who underwent surgery and remained in the hospital for nearly a month after he was stabbed near his heart with a five-inch knife. Authorities charged his son, Jeffrey A. Wright, 19, in the incident. The father and son spent five minutes together yesterday in a District Court meeting room after the younger Wright waived his right to a preliminary hearing.
SPORTS
April 25, 1998 | By Joe Wojciechowski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bill Kingston, the Moorestown High boys' tennis coach since 1974, was relieved of his duties with the boys' and girls' teams Thursday and junior varsity coach Richard Wright was named interim head coach for the rest of the season. "This was an incredibly hard decision," said Moorestown principal Lynn Schilling, who was a classmate of Kingston's at Moorestown. "Mr. Kingston and I have been dialoguing all week, but this was my decision. " Kingston, 55, could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
August 8, 1997 | By Erin Einhorn, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A man who said he "didn't know" that he had stabbed his father until the older man lay bleeding on the sidewalk pleaded guilty yesterday to attempted murder and was ordered to spend two to 4 1/2 years in Bucks County Prison. "I feel bad. I feel guilty about it," Jeffrey Wright, 19, told a Bucks County judge after entering his plea yesterday. "Every time I talk to him, I apologize to him. " His father, Richard Wright, 60, who was hospitalized for 17 days after being stabbed near his heart with a five-inch knife, was not in court yesterday, but sent a request through prosecutors that his son be given a sentence that allowed him to stay in the county jail.
NEWS
July 21, 2003 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Henry T. McCrary Jr., 82, of Mount Airy, a former city editor of the Philadelphia Tribune newspaper and a prominent entertainment lawyer, died of asbestos-related lung disease Wednesday at Pennsylvania Hospital. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. McCrary graduated from Lincoln University in 1942. He went to work at the Sun Shipyard in Chester, where he helped organize a union. His daughter, Helen McCrary Salahuddin, said that it was in the shipyards where he inhaled the asbestos that ultimately killed him. Mr. McCrary was accused of inciting a riot and spent two months in Delaware County jail because he refused to apologize for being involved in union activities at the shipyard.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The picturesque landscape of Hirsch Lake in Runnemede turned into a dirty, smelly mess this week when hundreds of dead fish floated belly up. Authorities on Thursday were trying to figure out what killed the fish - all carp that were six to nine inches long. Meanwhile, Runnemede public works employees had the unfortunate task of removing the remains. "It doesn't smell too pretty," Councilwoman Patricia Tartaglia-Passio said at the lake. Thursday morning, the borough cut off lake access at Singley Avenue from Center to Sheppard Avenues while crews investigated.
LIVING
February 21, 2000 | By Eils Lotozo, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. Gertrude Stein and Henry Miller. When the subject is American expatriates in Paris, these are the names that most often come up. But white authors weren't the only ones who sought inspiration in France. Beginning in the years just after World War I, a whole galaxy of African American writers also found a refuge there for the imagination. To writers such as Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Claude McKay, Richard Wright, Chester Himes and James Baldwin, Paris offered an escape from what Baldwin called the "American madness" of racism.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1986 | By SPENCER WESTON, Special to the Daily News
Caedmon Records has put on audio cassette a series of illuminating portraits of individuals and events connected with the history and experiences of Afro-Americans. The recordings range from a detailed view of the process of slavery to the speeches of Booker T. Washington and Frederick Douglass; Richard Wright's two classic novels, "Native Son" (2 cassettes, $19.95) and "Black Boy" (2 cassettes, $19.95), to the awarding-winning Broadway drama "A Raisin in the Sun" (3 cassettes, $26.94)
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NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The picturesque landscape of Hirsch Lake in Runnemede turned into a dirty, smelly mess this week when hundreds of dead fish floated belly up. Authorities on Thursday were trying to figure out what killed the fish - all carp that were six to nine inches long. Meanwhile, Runnemede public works employees had the unfortunate task of removing the remains. "It doesn't smell too pretty," Councilwoman Patricia Tartaglia-Passio said at the lake. Thursday morning, the borough cut off lake access at Singley Avenue from Center to Sheppard Avenues while crews investigated.
SPORTS
October 2, 2011
Sacred Heart's Cape-Atlantic League National Conference win streak in boys' soccer reached 30 games over three seasons with an 8-0 victory over visiting Cape May Tech on Friday. Steven Tobolski scored three goals, Drew Mesiano had three assists and goalie Dustin Griaff made three saves for the five-time and defending National Conference Division II champion Lions (7-0 overall, 6-0 conference). Tech (1-4, 1-4) got eight saves from goalie Trevor Gehrig. Steven Hand made three saves to secure the shutout, and Middle Township's Jacob Cowan, Kyle Stanford, and Matt Waldron netted goals for Middle Township en route to a 3-0 win over visiting Lower Cape May. Colonial.
NEWS
April 17, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Msgr. Richard J. Wright, 94, a former pastor, died Monday, April 12, at Villa St. Joseph in Darby, a residence for retired priests. For seven years, Msgr. Wright was pastor at St. Gabriel Church in Stowe; from 1980 to 1988, he was pastor at St. Christopher Church in Northeast Philadelphia. After retiring as a pastor, he was assigned to assist the pastor at St. Colman Church in Ardmore. Though he retired from his official duties in 1996, he lived at the church rectory until moving to Villa St. Joseph two years ago. He said 11 a.m. daily Mass at St. Colman's, visited the sick, and heard confessions, said the Rev. James C. Sherlock, who has been pastor at St. Colman's since 2004.
NEWS
March 8, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
W. Richard Wright Jr., 62, of Chester Springs, an antiques dealer who was an expert on vintage dolls and teddy bears, died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease March 1 at home. Mr. Wright's shop in Birchrunville, Chester County, was filled floor to ceiling with furniture, Victoriana, art deco and art nouveau curios, teddy bears, and French and German dolls. Upstairs were cardboard boxes of what Mr. Wright jokingly called "dead bodies" - torsos, arms, legs, and heads of antique dolls.
NEWS
May 19, 2008 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the end, the Philadelphians bowed out. The New England architect backed away, and the "somewhat famous" movie star was a no-go. The Esherick House, a rare private residence designed by revered 20th-century architect Louis Kahn and tucked away on a quiet Chestnut Hill cul-de-sac, failed to sell at auction yesterday. Asking price for the one-bedroom modernist home offered as a work of art? Between $2 million and $3 million. It wasn't the soft housing market, said Richard Wright of the Chicago auction house offering the property.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2003 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The suite of eight striking ink-jet prints that Richard Wright is showing at Silicon Gallery reveal an uncommon synthesis of painterly sensibility and photographic precision. Wright was a painter before he turned to photography. The odd otherworldliness of these images, all idiosyncratic views of tract housing, derives from the fact that they express a painter's imagination. They are, in fact, photographs manipulated digitally to create featureless black skies that extend upward to infinity, as if this suburban development connected with the dark void of the universe.
NEWS
July 21, 2003 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Henry T. McCrary Jr., 82, of Mount Airy, a former city editor of the Philadelphia Tribune newspaper and a prominent entertainment lawyer, died of asbestos-related lung disease Wednesday at Pennsylvania Hospital. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. McCrary graduated from Lincoln University in 1942. He went to work at the Sun Shipyard in Chester, where he helped organize a union. His daughter, Helen McCrary Salahuddin, said that it was in the shipyards where he inhaled the asbestos that ultimately killed him. Mr. McCrary was accused of inciting a riot and spent two months in Delaware County jail because he refused to apologize for being involved in union activities at the shipyard.
LIVING
February 21, 2000 | By Eils Lotozo, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. Gertrude Stein and Henry Miller. When the subject is American expatriates in Paris, these are the names that most often come up. But white authors weren't the only ones who sought inspiration in France. Beginning in the years just after World War I, a whole galaxy of African American writers also found a refuge there for the imagination. To writers such as Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Claude McKay, Richard Wright, Chester Himes and James Baldwin, Paris offered an escape from what Baldwin called the "American madness" of racism.
LIVING
February 18, 1999 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the character Bigger Thomas, he created doom, an enraged, misunderstood black man who smothers a white woman to death in the chilling classic, Native Son. But he also has created hope: As my anger ebbs, The spring stars grow bright again And the wind returns. He wrote of youthful pain and coming of age under the threatening eye of Jim Crow in his moving autobiography, Black Boy. But he's also written of youthful innocence: A little girl stares, Dewy eyes round with wonder, At morning glories.
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