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Ricky Jordan

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SPORTS
August 15, 1990 | By Michael Bamberger, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ricky Jordan, who began the season as the Phillies' cleanup hitter and everyday first baseman but whose year has been injury- and slump-plagued, was optioned to the Phillies' triple-A team, the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Red Barons, yesterday. Righthanded pitcher Tommy Greene, acquired last week as part of the Dale Murphy deal with the Atlanta Braves, was called up from Scranton to take Jordan's spot on the roster. Greene will start Saturday against the San Diego Padres. The Phillies had two motives in making the move, general manager Lee Thomas said: to allow Jordan, whose playing time has been highly irregular, a chance to get four at-bats a day, and to see how Greene performs as a Phillie.
SPORTS
June 5, 1994 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Kruk's locker-room limp is as bad as his new haircut. Recuperating from knee surgery, he hobbles on the bases and moves somewhat awkwardly in the field. Still, his name is in the lineup every day. And Ricky Jordan can live with that. "I knew that, as soon as Kruk came back, he'd play," said Jordan, who is back on the bench after more than three weeks as the Phillies' first baseman. "He's the starting first baseman. "But I really think I'm going to play a little more than I was (before Kruk's surgery)
SPORTS
March 18, 1994 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is the way baseball stars are born. A veteran is hurt and, finally given a chance, his longtime backup prospers. For some other player, maybe. Things don't ever seem to work that way for Ricky Jordan. "Something always seems to happen," Jordan said. When he wasn't traded this winter, he thought that perhaps he could force a belated deal by publicly griping, at last, about still being a Phillies backup. Afterward, although they kept things quiet, there were indications the Phils had renewed efforts to trade Jordan.
SPORTS
March 4, 1993 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's only one thing keeping Ricky Jordan from marching into the manager's office - and it's a pretty hefty obstacle. "I would be moaning and groaning if anybody but John Kruk were playing first base," Jordan, Kruk's backup, said yesterday. "But there are probably only three or four first basemen in all of baseball any better than him. So what can I do?" What Jordan, 28, will do for the most part this season is sit on the bench - forced to postpone his dreams of regular play until he either becomes a free-agent (after the '94 season)
SPORTS
January 20, 1993 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Is a pitcher who won 13 games last season worth 3.1 million bucks a year in this mind-boggling day and age? Well, the 13-game winner in question, Terry Mulholland, thinks he is. The Phillies, on the other hand, think he's worth $2 million. If you're calculating along at home, you know that adds up to a $1.1 million difference of opinion. But that's not all. It also adds up to what could be the Phillies' fiercest salary-arbitration battle ever. Meanwhile, on the arbitration undercard yesterday, the Phillies found themselves embroiled in a fight that could go the distance with first baseman Ricky Jordan, too. Jordan headed into the arbitration wars asking for $1.25 million.
SPORTS
May 8, 1992 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Ricky Jordan's two-out single with the bases loaded in the sixth inning drove in the tying and go-ahead runs yesterday as Scranton/Wilkes-Barre downed Richmond, 7-6, in an International League game. Jordan, who broke his jaw during spring training, was 2 for 5 in the second game of his rehabilitation stint with the Red Barons. BINGHAMTON 5, READING 0 BINGHAMTON - Pitcher John Johnstone defeated the Phillies for the second time this season as Binghamton won an Eastern League game.
SPORTS
September 28, 1989 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
He arrived late last summer without much fanfare. Yes, he was a first-round draft choice in 1983. Yes, he had hit at every minor league classification, a low of .274, a high of .318. Yes, at 6-5, he looked like a player, looked like a first baseman. But the scouts weren't sure. And he was coming to the Phillies, a team with more bad news than most teams had news. Well, it turned out Ricky Jordan was a player, a very good player, perhaps too good too soon. He hit a three-run homer in his first official at-bat.
SPORTS
July 25, 1994 | by Ed Barkowitz, Daily News Sports Writer
Lee Gendaszek didn't go to Mass Saturday night praying for money. She always goes to the 7:30 service on Saturdays, and would never stoop to such tactics. When she got home, she tuned into WGMP (1210-AM) to catch up on the Phillies action. That's when Gendaszek heard Ricky Jordan was batting for her in the Daily News Home Run Payoff inning. She quickly called her sister. "Are you listening to the ballgame?" she asked he sister. "I think they called my name. " Gendaszek's name was indeed called, and when Jordan smashed a home run to left-center in the sixth inning in the 7-1 loss to San Diego, Gendaszek became the eighth $1,000 winner in the Daily News Home Run Payoff Contest.
SPORTS
July 3, 1990 | The Inquirer Staff
The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Red Barons won twice last night, first defeating the Pawtucket Red Sox, 4-3, in the completion of an International League game that had been suspended by rain in the fourth inning Sunday. In the scheduled game, the Barons won, 5-2, behind Scott Service. In the first game, Ricky Jordan, the disabled Phillies first baseman who is recovering from a sprained left wrist, was one of three Red Barons to hit home runs. Jordan is scheduled to come off the disabled list tomorrow.
SPORTS
February 9, 1992 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Item: Charlie Hayes says Ricky Jordan "wants to get out of Philadelphia as bad as I do. " Item: Phillies deny the relentless rumor that they are going to trade Jordan to the Angels for Dick Schofield. It seems as if he has been around since about 1978, but Ricky Jordan is just 26 years old. His job description as a Phillie reads: "Human insurance policy. " His agent, Jeff Moorad, says it is Jordan's "desire" to go somewhere else "if that's the only way he can play every day. " Moorad also says his gut feeling is that the Phillies will accommodate that desire "sooner rather than later.
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SPORTS
February 16, 2014 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. – The bad times far outweighed the good during Jim Fregosi's managerial tenure with the Phillies, and even then he was able to make you believe he was the smartest man in the room. He had weaknesses, but he still made you think he was as strong as his opinions. His ego was so immense that it became one of his nicknames – "Ego" instead of "Frego" - and still, he was a human magnet. Fregosi, 71, died Friday morning in a Miami hospital after suffering multiple strokes Sunday during a Caribbean cruise.
SPORTS
July 15, 2011 | By JON CAROULIS, For the Daily News
WILLIAMSPORT - When he broke in with the Phillies in 1990, he was a wiry kid with longish hair who looked like somebody's little brother. Now he is 45, broader in the chest and arms and wearing a buzz haircut. Maybe the short hair conveys a military or father figure, a role he sometimes has to play as manager of a team of very young players in the minor leagues. It has been nearly 2 decades since Mickey Morandini was a part of the 1993 Phillies, one of the franchise's greatest seasons, and even then he knew he wanted to stay in the game when he was done playing.
SPORTS
June 23, 2010 | By PAUL HAGEN, hagenp@phillynews.com
If you had to pinpoint a moment when Darren Daulton reached the fork in the road and took the one that would eventually lead to having a plaque on the Phillies Wall of Fame, it might just have been the evening of Aug. 13, 1991, at Pittsburgh's Three Rivers Stadium. In the seventh inning, the Phillies had the bases loaded and one out. Down by a run, with Daulton scheduled to hit, manager Jim Fregosi yanked his catcher from the game and sent pinch-hitter Ricky Jordan to the plate.
SPORTS
April 26, 1995 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
On the afternoon before the Phillies played their final exhibition game, general manager Lee Thomas sat in his office at Veterans Stadium, thinking glum thoughts. These thoughts had names, Tommy Greene and Bobby Munoz. Thomas couldn't shake the nagging feeling that, if those two starting pitchers were healthy and pitching the way they are capable of, he'd feel pretty good about the Phillies' chances this year. Instead, Greene could be facing career-threatening reconstructive shoulder surgery and Munoz, also on the disabled list with a sore elbow, had become a 6-foot-8 question mark.
SPORTS
February 28, 1995 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
If a slow bat is chasing a half-fastball, the balance of baseball remains in order. The delicate calculus that governs the game is undisturbed when a below- average runner hits a ground ball to the left side of the infield, where it is relayed to first by a guy who unfurls a throw trailing an invisible parachute. The guy is still out by a step. After an absence of 200 days - since Ricky Jordan singled to score Billy Hatcher with the winning run in the bottom of the 15th inning shortly before the witching hour of midnight on Aug. 11, 1994 - Phillies baseball returned to the field yesterday afternoon.
SPORTS
August 12, 1994 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
One moment Ricky Jordan was doing something electric. The next, he felt like a guy about to get strapped in a chair and shot full of juice. Yes, it was a strange night all the way around at Veterans Stadium during, and after, especially after, what might have been the Phillies' final game of a mostly forgettable season. There was good pitching, in part because there was disinterested hitting. There were good plays, along with some clunkers. There were people parading through the stands displaying anti-strike banners.
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | By Brian Freeman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Ryne Sandberg decided to retire last month, Tommy Shields figured he was on his way to Chicago. The former Conestoga star was mentally ready to move up to the big leagues, but physically he was hurting. So the Chicago Cubs instead promoted infielder Todd Haney, and Shields, a shortstop, remained in Des Moines, Iowa, with the Cubs' triple-A affiliate. "It's been disappointing," Shields said. "I thought I'd be the one to go up, but I've had a lot of injuries this season.
SPORTS
July 27, 1994 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
The signs are all too familiar. Conversations carried on while huddled in a corner. The furtive glances. It was apparent something was amiss in the Phillies' clubhouse yesterday afternoon. The game started. Was John Kruk grimacing more than usual, moving more gingerly than normal? After the fifth inning, it became apparent something was wrong. Ricky Jordan came out to play first base. The announcement that followed was clinical. Kruk, who had surgery for testicular cancer on March 8, felt abdominal pain earlier in the day. After being evaluated first by Dr. Gerald Kuykendall in Ft. Lauderdale and then by Marlins team physician Dan Kanell, it was decided he would return to Philadelphia for further evaluation.
SPORTS
July 25, 1994 | by Ed Barkowitz, Daily News Sports Writer
Lee Gendaszek didn't go to Mass Saturday night praying for money. She always goes to the 7:30 service on Saturdays, and would never stoop to such tactics. When she got home, she tuned into WGMP (1210-AM) to catch up on the Phillies action. That's when Gendaszek heard Ricky Jordan was batting for her in the Daily News Home Run Payoff inning. She quickly called her sister. "Are you listening to the ballgame?" she asked he sister. "I think they called my name. " Gendaszek's name was indeed called, and when Jordan smashed a home run to left-center in the sixth inning in the 7-1 loss to San Diego, Gendaszek became the eighth $1,000 winner in the Daily News Home Run Payoff Contest.
SPORTS
July 21, 1994 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Barry Bonds and Matt Williams hit their obligatory home runs. Pitcher Mark Portugal remained a member in good standing of the Phillies-Killer Club of America. But the player who really ruined the Phils' afternoon yesterday wasn't named Bonds or Williams or Portugal. Or even Darryl Strawberry. The player was little-used Mike Benjamin. Eight-hole hitter. Owner of a .175 career average when the season began. A good-field, no-hit, Bobby Wine-type shortstop. Benjamin, filling in for slumping shortstop Royce Clayton, rapped out two doubles, knocked in a career-high four runs, and made two spectacular fielding plays as the San Francisco Giants defeated the Phillies, 9-2, before 43,966 fans at tropical Veterans Stadium, where the temperature on the field reached 146 degrees.
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