CollectionsRicotta
IN THE NEWS

Ricotta

FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
October 11, 2012 | By Ashley Primis, For The Inquirer
Ricotta is having its moment. Until recently, it was that bland, one-note, workhorse cheese, bought in supermarkets by the tub, mostly used as the paste that held together layers of lasagna. But that was before it got the fresh-local-artisan makeover. Now, ricotta - along with that other fresh Italian cheese, mozzarella - is stealing the spotlight from its more complex, aged curds-and-whey cousins at restaurants around the city. And for good reason. When made by hand, with premier ingredients, the airy textures and delicate flavors can stand on their own. Cheese this good needs only a pinch of flaked sea salt and a slice of oiled toast to make for a memorable bite.
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
When was the last time you had a truly memorable dessert in an Italian restaurant? If it's been a while, look in on Solo Mio in Old City, which prides itself on its homemade ricotta cheesecakes and a ricotta-pasta pie. Solo Mio is the kind of place many restaurants try to be: friendly, budget- priced and so spotless that you'll notice. First-time customers are treated like regulars. The staff is well-informed about the menu. The pizzas, pasta dishes and desserts are made with skill and pride.
FOOD
July 8, 1992 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Reach for the ricotta when you want to make a meatless main course guaranteed to please. Super-rich in dairy nutrition, ricotta cheese is the protein power behind lasagna, everybody's favorite meatless entree, but there are other ways to use it. Traditional lasagna dishes are high in fat and calories thanks to other cheeses. Ricotta is an Italian word that means "recooked," a nod to its origin as a cheese traditionally made from the lean low-calorie whey, the liquid drained off the high fat milk used in the production of provolone and other full-fat cheeses.
FOOD
February 14, 1988 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
There's enough bad press about cheese to make a self-respecting cow think of kicking the bucket. Cited as a harbinger of heart attack, and spurned by generations of bland-palate diners as a food that only the smell-blind could love, an entire world of noble cheeses with all their gustatory idiosyncrasies is rapidly being processed into near-extinction. When is the last time you had a Camembert bulging ripe, pungent with raw Norman milk and a sweet hint of almond? Is there a Cheddar in your memory clabbered to a curd so fat that every slice hovers between solidarity and total collapse?
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says ricotta cheese tainted with listeria bacteria is linked to 14 illnesses and at least one death. The imported Italian ricotta salata cheese distributed by Forever Cheese Inc. of New York is linked to illnesses in 11 states and the District of Columbia. Forever Cheese issued a recall of one lot - 800 wheels of ricotta salata, or roughly 4,800 pounds - on Monday. The cheese was distributed to stores and restaurants in California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington between June 20 and Aug. 9. Jeff DiMeo of Forever Cheese said the recalled Frescolina brand ricotta salata cheese is from one batch manufactured in Italy's Puglia region, but he would not name the Italian company that manufactured it. The Food and Drug Administration identified the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes bacteria in an uncut sample of the cheese.
FOOD
July 10, 2008
Amid the recent fervor for artisan cheesemaking, mild-mannered ricotta has largely been left behind in the firm embrace of big industry's plastic tubs. In a little storefront on East Passyunk Avenue, however, Philip Mancuso remains a notable holdout: the last of South Philly's masters of handmade ricotta. The Italian matrons who came to buy fresh curds for their ravioli and cheesecakes since Mancuso's father, Lucio, founded this cozy storefront in 1940, are fewer and far between. But Mancuso still makes it fresh weekly, storing tall clouds of the cheese in a glass refrigerator behind his counter.
FOOD
December 11, 2008
Beyond the same old cheesecake Tucked in the cheese cases at Claudio's is a lightly bronzed, Bundt-shaped wonder of a "cake" called baked ricotta di bufala. No eggs. No flour. Just a fine-textured ricotta from cow's milk and water buffalo milk, baked with sugar and a hint of lemon. If you've sworn off cheesecake, this elegant dessert will win you back. Kitchen friends For little hands eager to help in the kitchen, these colorful silicone kitchen tools are perfect stocking stuffers for budding chefs.
FOOD
December 10, 1997 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
It is still morning, but cheesemaker Lino Esposito and his crew are well into a workday that started for some at 2 a.m. and was in high gear by 5. A worker stirs the final vat of what was milk not yet 24 hours from the cow. Stray globs of milk solids are eased into the spongy masses of curd floating atop the thin liquid whey. Earlier batches became creamy rounds of fresh mozzarella - fior de latte. Now this same basic curd, with small changes in timing or temperature or added enzyme, will yield cheeses of varying taste and texture.
NEWS
February 23, 2010 | By Kia Gregory, Inquirer Staff Writer
Staring out the window of his cheese shop one slow afternoon, Philip Mancuso declares himself "the last of the Mohicans. " After almost 70 years on Passyunk Avenue near Mifflin Street, the store's competition is long gone, along with many of the old-timers who craved Lucio Mancuso & Son's handmade cheese. Nowadays, hardly anyone makes homemade anything, Mancuso says plainly, more observation than criticism. Dinner, he says, comes frozen or ready-made. Then, there's the flat economy.
FOOD
May 2, 2013 | By Stephanie Witt Sedgwick, Washington Post
This baked ziti dish gets its zip from ricotta, asparagus, and fresh tomatoes.   Ziti, Asparagus, and Fresh Tomato Sauce 6 to 8 servings 12 ounces dried ziti Kosher salt 11/2 pounds asparagus (ends trimmed), cut into 1-inch pieces 15 ounces ricotta cheese 6 tablespoons grated Parmigiano cheese, plus 2 tablespoons for baking 1/3 to 2/3 cup low-fat milk 6 tablespoons chopped fresh basil, divided use Ground black pepper 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons finely chopped garlic 2 cups diced, peeled and seeded fresh tomatoes 2 tablespoons dry white wine 1/8 teaspoon sugar 1. Cook the pasta.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
May 9, 2013 | By Stephanie Witt Sedgwick, Washington Post
This quiche remake reduces the butter and cheese and eliminates the crust entirely. This dish can easily be prepared a day in advance. Reheat uncovered in a 350-degree oven.   Spinach and Mushroom Torte 10 to 12 servings 1 tablespoon mild olive oil 1 tablespoon butter 1/2 cup finely diced onion 12 ounces white mush- rooms, cleaned, stem- med, and thinly sliced Kosher salt Ground black pepper 8 large eggs, beaten 11/2 cups low-fat milk (2 percent)
FOOD
April 11, 2013 | By Rick Nichols, Special to The Inquirer
The Saint James in Ardmore was playing outside its original suburban comfort-food zone one recent night, evidence that owner Michael Schulson (who also owns Sampan, at 13th and Sansom Streets) has been logging more hours at the stove. Dollops of bigeye tuna tartare on warm rice crackers emerged. And slivers of glistening Berkshire pork belly with schmears of root-beer barbecue sauce. But it was the overhauled pasta dishes that hinted at a new day, one in particular - an exquisite baby fava bean and ricotta ravioli, redolent of fresh mint, the pasta rolled elegantly thin and tender, and bathed in butter and parmesan.
FOOD
October 11, 2012 | By Ashley Primis, For The Inquirer
Ricotta is having its moment. Until recently, it was that bland, one-note, workhorse cheese, bought in supermarkets by the tub, mostly used as the paste that held together layers of lasagna. But that was before it got the fresh-local-artisan makeover. Now, ricotta - along with that other fresh Italian cheese, mozzarella - is stealing the spotlight from its more complex, aged curds-and-whey cousins at restaurants around the city. And for good reason. When made by hand, with premier ingredients, the airy textures and delicate flavors can stand on their own. Cheese this good needs only a pinch of flaked sea salt and a slice of oiled toast to make for a memorable bite.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says ricotta cheese tainted with listeria bacteria is linked to 14 illnesses and at least one death. The imported Italian ricotta salata cheese distributed by Forever Cheese Inc. of New York is linked to illnesses in 11 states and the District of Columbia. Forever Cheese issued a recall of one lot - 800 wheels of ricotta salata, or roughly 4,800 pounds - on Monday. The cheese was distributed to stores and restaurants in California, Colorado, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington between June 20 and Aug. 9. Jeff DiMeo of Forever Cheese said the recalled Frescolina brand ricotta salata cheese is from one batch manufactured in Italy's Puglia region, but he would not name the Italian company that manufactured it. The Food and Drug Administration identified the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes bacteria in an uncut sample of the cheese.
FOOD
August 30, 2012 | By Mario Batali, McCLATCHY-TRIBUNE
I love cheesecake in any form, but this year I am most in love with a cheesecake with a surprise: Nectarine and Black Pepper Cheesecake. Ricotta brings a lightness that is unmatched to the classic New York cheesecake. I add mascarpone and American cream cheese to help balance the ricotta and achieve an ideal creamy texture. Near Modena, in Emilia-Romagna, nectarines are often served with black pepper and balsamic vinegar, a combination so deceptively perfect and balanced that it seemed a logical step to mix that combination with delicious ricotta and cream cheese.
NEWS
February 23, 2010 | By Kia Gregory, Inquirer Staff Writer
Staring out the window of his cheese shop one slow afternoon, Philip Mancuso declares himself "the last of the Mohicans. " After almost 70 years on Passyunk Avenue near Mifflin Street, the store's competition is long gone, along with many of the old-timers who craved Lucio Mancuso & Son's handmade cheese. Nowadays, hardly anyone makes homemade anything, Mancuso says plainly, more observation than criticism. Dinner, he says, comes frozen or ready-made. Then, there's the flat economy.
FOOD
September 10, 2009 | By Laura Vozzella, BALTIMORE SUN
I don't know about you, but the recession has done nothing to curb my appetite for fancy cheese, just my ability to buy it. So I set out to make the stuff at home. That explains why I soon found myself pouring curdled milk into an old pillowcase; dialing up the cheese-making equivalent of the Butterball Turkey hot line; and, eventually, eating some very good and some not-so-good cheese. "You make a lot of bad cheese before you make good cheese," said Kate Dallam, owner of Broom's Bloom Dairy in Bel Air, Md. I started with ricotta and saw that the recipe called for the cheese to drain in "butter muslin," a type of cheesecloth with a tighter-than-usual weave.
FOOD
December 11, 2008
Beyond the same old cheesecake Tucked in the cheese cases at Claudio's is a lightly bronzed, Bundt-shaped wonder of a "cake" called baked ricotta di bufala. No eggs. No flour. Just a fine-textured ricotta from cow's milk and water buffalo milk, baked with sugar and a hint of lemon. If you've sworn off cheesecake, this elegant dessert will win you back. Kitchen friends For little hands eager to help in the kitchen, these colorful silicone kitchen tools are perfect stocking stuffers for budding chefs.
FOOD
July 10, 2008
Amid the recent fervor for artisan cheesemaking, mild-mannered ricotta has largely been left behind in the firm embrace of big industry's plastic tubs. In a little storefront on East Passyunk Avenue, however, Philip Mancuso remains a notable holdout: the last of South Philly's masters of handmade ricotta. The Italian matrons who came to buy fresh curds for their ravioli and cheesecakes since Mancuso's father, Lucio, founded this cozy storefront in 1940, are fewer and far between. But Mancuso still makes it fresh weekly, storing tall clouds of the cheese in a glass refrigerator behind his counter.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|