CollectionsRiddler
IN THE NEWS

Riddler

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
In "Batman Forever," our tormented superhero gets the quintessential '90s cure-all: therapy and a makeover. The counseling comes courtesy of Chase Meridian (Nicole Kidman), a ravishing psychiatrist who helps Batman work through some of his notorious personal problems. The makeover is the work of director Joel Schumacher, who turns Tim Burton's Gotham City into a loud, campy disco and gives Batman a new body suit that appears to be taken from the Mapplethorpe collection. (On a subtextual level, this movie is brazenly determined to remind us that underneath it all, the caped crusader is really just a guy named Bruce.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1995 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
After two Batmans, Michael Keaton reportedly threw in the cowl because the script he was handed for the third Bat-saga had too much about the bad guys and not enough about that brooding avenger in black rubber. (There were also some squawks about a bigger paycheck: Oh, something in the vicinity of playboy billionaire Bruce Wayne's net worth.) Enter Val Kilmer, who acts with his lips almost as well as Keaton did, and who, quite simply, has lucked out. Despite (and perhaps because of)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2012 | Chuck Darrow
RIDDLE ME THIS, Batman: Who has the coolest job title in Atlantic City? It says here that's Mitch Gorshin, whose business card identifies him as "Executive Director Fun & Creative" for Revel. Gorshin, 47, son of the late actor-impressionist Frank Gorshin (best-known as the Riddler on the 1960s "Batman" TV series), conjures up entertainment and marketing ideas to keep Revel on the cutting edge of the hospitality industry. His boldest and most prominent concept so far has been "The Ball," the 90,000-pound illuminated orb that rests atop Revel's 47-story hotel tower.
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
He's punched out the Penguin, wrestled the Riddler and crushed the Catwoman. But now, Robin the Boy Wonder has been blown to bits by that archvillain, the Joker. Death for Batman's young sidekick comes next week when DC Comics distributes Batman issue No. 428, the third installment of the four-part "A Death in the Family. " But the real force behind the demise of the younger half of the Dynamic Duo was - Gasp! - the readers of Batman. Robin was tied up and blown away by the Joker after a two-day telephone poll of readers, in which they voted, 5,343 to 5,271, to blast him into comic-book oblivion.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2005 | By JEROME MAIDA -- For the Daily News
Batman has appeared in more comic books than any other character. With more than 66 years' worth of stories to choose from and the most colorful, interesting and deadly rogues' gallery of any hero - Spider-Man is the only character that comes close - he may have more high-quality material to choose from than any other comic book icon. But since "Batman Begins" deals with the birth of the character - who he is and why he does what he does - it would be natural to seek out those stories that also do those things.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When nature calls, better hang up. Ace Deuce, as the second installment of the Jim Carrey movie about the pet detective with the cockatoo coif might be called, is loud, frantic, and only a fraction as funny as the original. When the internationally renowned animal finder fails to rescue a raccoon from the sheer cliffs of a rugged mountain range (the film's one truly hilarious sequence, with the tiny creature in full mountain-climbing harness), he retreats to a Buddhist ashram resembling a Himalayan theme park in the Hollywood Hills.
NEWS
October 16, 2002 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
George Burns played God in three movies, so you might imagine that when he got to heaven after living to the ripe age of 100 he would own the place. But the hokey contrivance in the beginning of the amiable Say Goodnight Gracie finds God, who is even older than Burns, denying the comedian entrance until he gives us a review of his life. Stranded in clouds of fog on the Helen Hayes Theatre stage that represent a gray limbo, Frank Gorshin tosses off a joke about being in Buffalo that sets the tone of the show.
NEWS
July 20, 1990 | By Christopher Cornell, Special to The Inquirer
Among your choices on cable TV tonight: a pair of Batmans. Or should that be Batmen? PRIME TIME PETS (8-8:30 p.m., Ch. 10) - When this show debuted, a lot of people called it a rip-off of David Letterman's "Stupid Pet Tricks" segment. But if you've been watching, you know that it has a sentimentality that Letterman probably couldn't muster if he tried, but which host Wil Shriner seems to handle with remarkable ease. It's really much more a rip-off of America's Funniest Home Videos, with one exception: While America seems to love watching people appear to get injured, howls of outrage would erupt if the same things were shown happening to animals.
NEWS
June 20, 1997 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The role of Batman has become one of the most puzzling casting problems in all of Hollywood - title billing in a $200 million-a-pop franchise, but a job that nobody seems to want. At least not for very long. We're now on "Batman and Robin," the fourth installment of the resurrected series, and we're already on our third Batman. What a transition it's been. First there was Michael Keaton, the disturbed Batman. Then there was Val Kilmer, the sexy Batman. Now comes George Clooney, who stakes out new territory as sort of the Fred MacMurray of the group, playing worried father to the headstrong Robin (Chris O'Donnell again)
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
The Illusionists: Witness the Impossible , brings a motley Vegas-style assortment of magicians (and one escape artist) from a six-week residency on Broadway to the Academy of Music. They've got fireworks, lasers, indoor snow, interactive video screens, and dancer/assistants dressed in the ragged Victorian hooker/dandy style seen sauntering across many a steam-punk conference floor. But do they make the magic happen? The answer is complicated. First, our cast of characters: Adam Trent, "The Futurist," possesses Ryan Seacrest's amiability, and a similarly bland set of tricks.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
The Illusionists: Witness the Impossible , brings a motley Vegas-style assortment of magicians (and one escape artist) from a six-week residency on Broadway to the Academy of Music. They've got fireworks, lasers, indoor snow, interactive video screens, and dancer/assistants dressed in the ragged Victorian hooker/dandy style seen sauntering across many a steam-punk conference floor. But do they make the magic happen? The answer is complicated. First, our cast of characters: Adam Trent, "The Futurist," possesses Ryan Seacrest's amiability, and a similarly bland set of tricks.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2012 | Chuck Darrow
RIDDLE ME THIS, Batman: Who has the coolest job title in Atlantic City? It says here that's Mitch Gorshin, whose business card identifies him as "Executive Director Fun & Creative" for Revel. Gorshin, 47, son of the late actor-impressionist Frank Gorshin (best-known as the Riddler on the 1960s "Batman" TV series), conjures up entertainment and marketing ideas to keep Revel on the cutting edge of the hospitality industry. His boldest and most prominent concept so far has been "The Ball," the 90,000-pound illuminated orb that rests atop Revel's 47-story hotel tower.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
RIDDLE COMICS GUY this: How is it possible that one of the Batman villains best-known to the general public for the past four decades just concluded his first comic-book battle with the Dark Knight this past month? The answer is simple, if somewhat surprising. King Tut was an adversary created specifically for the 1960s "Batman" TV show and immediately made an indelible impression. Unfortunately, that's because the character was so over-the-top, so ridiculous in both his appearance and actions that he made all the other actors and situations in the camp-fest that was the TV phenomenon look serious enough to be in a Martin Scorsese film.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2005 | By JEROME MAIDA -- For the Daily News
Batman has appeared in more comic books than any other character. With more than 66 years' worth of stories to choose from and the most colorful, interesting and deadly rogues' gallery of any hero - Spider-Man is the only character that comes close - he may have more high-quality material to choose from than any other comic book icon. But since "Batman Begins" deals with the birth of the character - who he is and why he does what he does - it would be natural to seek out those stories that also do those things.
NEWS
October 16, 2002 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
George Burns played God in three movies, so you might imagine that when he got to heaven after living to the ripe age of 100 he would own the place. But the hokey contrivance in the beginning of the amiable Say Goodnight Gracie finds God, who is even older than Burns, denying the comedian entrance until he gives us a review of his life. Stranded in clouds of fog on the Helen Hayes Theatre stage that represent a gray limbo, Frank Gorshin tosses off a joke about being in Buffalo that sets the tone of the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Film at the Prince folks have come up with another winning program: comic books. Taking a cue from the recent box office successes of Spider-man, X-Men and The Flaming Carrot (OK, forget that last one - but check out Bob Burden's book featuring "the world's first surrealist superhero"), the Prince people have put together a late-summer series teeming with caped crusaders, Japanese anime, vintage noir, '60s camp, and other cool stuff adapted from and influenced by comics. The action begins tonight with Joseph Losey's 1966 study in pop-art cinema, Modesty Blaise.
NEWS
June 20, 1997 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The role of Batman has become one of the most puzzling casting problems in all of Hollywood - title billing in a $200 million-a-pop franchise, but a job that nobody seems to want. At least not for very long. We're now on "Batman and Robin," the fourth installment of the resurrected series, and we're already on our third Batman. What a transition it's been. First there was Michael Keaton, the disturbed Batman. Then there was Val Kilmer, the sexy Batman. Now comes George Clooney, who stakes out new territory as sort of the Fred MacMurray of the group, playing worried father to the headstrong Robin (Chris O'Donnell again)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1996 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In show business, one never knows when a performance will attract more attention than anticipated. It might even be a small role that wasn't given much thought at the time and was quickly forgotten. That's the way it was when Frank Gorshin spent three weeks in Philadelphia a couple of years ago to film his part in the recently released 12 Monkeys. "I really had just about forgotten about that film," he said in Atlantic City on Wednesday, shortly before opening at the Sands in New York, New York, a new Greg Thompson musical starring Gorshin.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When nature calls, better hang up. Ace Deuce, as the second installment of the Jim Carrey movie about the pet detective with the cockatoo coif might be called, is loud, frantic, and only a fraction as funny as the original. When the internationally renowned animal finder fails to rescue a raccoon from the sheer cliffs of a rugged mountain range (the film's one truly hilarious sequence, with the tiny creature in full mountain-climbing harness), he retreats to a Buddhist ashram resembling a Himalayan theme park in the Hollywood Hills.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
In "Batman Forever," our tormented superhero gets the quintessential '90s cure-all: therapy and a makeover. The counseling comes courtesy of Chase Meridian (Nicole Kidman), a ravishing psychiatrist who helps Batman work through some of his notorious personal problems. The makeover is the work of director Joel Schumacher, who turns Tim Burton's Gotham City into a loud, campy disco and gives Batman a new body suit that appears to be taken from the Mapplethorpe collection. (On a subtextual level, this movie is brazenly determined to remind us that underneath it all, the caped crusader is really just a guy named Bruce.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|