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NEWS
January 8, 2006 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Like so many Americans, my curiosity about German wine was nipped early on by Blue Nun, the infamously cheap liebfraumilch from '70s TV that was the bottled equivalent of a sloppy sweet kiss. "Liebfraumilch . . . ," Hansjakob Werlen says with a shudder, cursing Germany's generic low-end swill. "Insipid! Dull! Overly sweet one-note wine! So much plonk! People need to taste some real riesling!" The inimitably enthusiastic Werlen, a German professor at Swarthmore College and founder of the local Slow Food chapter, does not make such statements idly.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2008
Only a grape as noble as riesling can be such a chameleon, and pull it off convincingly at a bargain price. Consider these two completely opposite examples on sale in the state stores. From Germany's Kallfelz Estate comes the more classical take, a 2006 kabinett for $14.99 that delivers a pretty nose of honey and beeswax, with juicy peach on the palate and a balanced finish of citrus pith and acidity to keep it from cloying. A great aperitif for a holiday party. Riesling's drier side, meanwhile, gets a lively expression in this well-regarded 2007 Alkoomi from Western Australia.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
BUZZ: Hey, Marnie, what's your favorite grape? Mine is raisin. Have 'em with breakfast every morning. Marnie: Raisins aren't a type of grape, Buzz, they're dried grapes. Usually, seedless table grapes are used, since wine grapes have seeds. Buzz: OK, so what's your fave wine grape, then? Marnie: I like them all, but I have a special fondness for Riesling. Buzz: No way! That's a sweet white, right? I thought that stuff was for dabblers, not big-shot sommeliers like you. Marnie: Well, it's true that Riesling appeals to wine novices and those who haven't acquired a taste for dry wines.
NEWS
January 28, 1987
My congratulations to The Inquirer! In this Age of Iron it has successfuly created a new hero - the drinker of Pennsylvania. We picture elderly couples plucked from the bridge clutching their black beer to their bosom, disconsolate citizens fretting away dry Sundays, forced to read the newspaper as a barren alternative to making purchases and deprived young executives unable to satisfy their craving for Yalumba Carte d'Or Riesling at a moment's notice....
NEWS
June 12, 2015
BUZZ: Hey, Marnie, it's supposed to be in the 90s this weekend. That's ice-cold beer weather for me, but what do wine drinkers like you sip? Marnie: There are lots of options, and we chill them down, too - typically white wines, like Riesling and vinho verde, pinot grigio and sauvignon blanc. Whether you're a beer or wine drinker, it's natural to reach for the coldest drinks when you're overheated. The wines that taste best coldest are almost always light-bodied whites that come from cold places, but sometimes include sparkling wines and roses.
FOOD
January 22, 1986 | By Michael Bauer and Anne Lindsay Greer, Special to The Inquirer
Food can be as nourishing to our fantasies as to our bodies, especially in winter, when we want to escape the cold but see no salvation on the horizon. Although you may not be able to go to the tropics, our Fish Filets (mahi- mahi, swordfish or halibut) With Ginger-Orange Sauce will give you that tropical feeling, if only for a moment. There's nothing unusual about oranges and ginger, but when they are combined in a sauce for fish, it's easy to imagine you are basking on the sand at Waikiki, with ocean waters tickling your feet.
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NEWS
June 12, 2015
BUZZ: Hey, Marnie, it's supposed to be in the 90s this weekend. That's ice-cold beer weather for me, but what do wine drinkers like you sip? Marnie: There are lots of options, and we chill them down, too - typically white wines, like Riesling and vinho verde, pinot grigio and sauvignon blanc. Whether you're a beer or wine drinker, it's natural to reach for the coldest drinks when you're overheated. The wines that taste best coldest are almost always light-bodied whites that come from cold places, but sometimes include sparkling wines and roses.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
  B   UZZ: Hey, Marnie, I'm glad I ran into you. We have our family reunion barbecue every Labor Day in Fairmount Park, and this year I'm supposed to bring the wine. Any suggestions? Marnie: Sure thing, Buzz. I recommend sticking to chilled, lightweight wines when the occasion involves drinking in broad daylight. This goes double for warm weather, so steer away from the heavier reds. Think white or pink, and bring a cooler. Buzz: Oh, I never leave home without a cooler.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
THE WAY Terry Berch McNally figured it, why would a restaurant make a big fuss about eating locally if it didn't also offer guests the option of drinking locally? McNally is a known force in the Philly restaurant scene, a mover and shaker since the late '70s and co-owner of Fairmount's London Grill since 1991. "When I travel in Italy every year, it's natural to drink wine from the region you're in," she said. "So why not do that with Pennsylvania wine?" She decided to align both the restaurant's wine list and the list at her adjoining Paris Wine Bar, which opened last year, with her longstanding eat-local philosophy.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
BUZZ: Hey, Marnie, what's your favorite grape? Mine is raisin. Have 'em with breakfast every morning. Marnie: Raisins aren't a type of grape, Buzz, they're dried grapes. Usually, seedless table grapes are used, since wine grapes have seeds. Buzz: OK, so what's your fave wine grape, then? Marnie: I like them all, but I have a special fondness for Riesling. Buzz: No way! That's a sweet white, right? I thought that stuff was for dabblers, not big-shot sommeliers like you. Marnie: Well, it's true that Riesling appeals to wine novices and those who haven't acquired a taste for dry wines.
NEWS
February 24, 2013
Few wines can match the dynamic moves of a good riesling - the world's most underappreciated grape. And when you find one like this 2011 Ockfener Bockstein Kabinett from Dr. Fischer in the Saar, on sale in Pennsylvania for an amazing $13, you'll realize there's rarely a better value. What do I mean by moves? A good riesling changes like a chameleon from sniff to sip, and is never what you first expect - not, at least, from the perfume of nectar, white peach, and apple that greets your nose.
NEWS
August 6, 2012
Style lines in the riesling world have been drawn, traditionally, as clear as international borders. In Germany, even the crispest versions typically teased with residual sweetness. For bone-dry bottles, one turned to France's Alsace. But the distinctions are no longer so neat and tidy - especially as dry riesling ("trocken") continues to be a rising trend in Germany, too. This dry riesling from Selbach in Mosel (a second label from the premium Selbach-Oster group) is a great example of the modern German approach, from the translated modern "Fish" label to the lack of sweetness.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | Cheap Buzz
BUZZ: Hey, Marnie, a friend offered me a glass of German riesling over the weekend. I looked at the bottle and the alcohol was only 8 percent! I can get more of a kick from a glass of German beer. Marnie: Well, Buzz, there are plenty of people who drink wine more for its delicious flavor than for its alcoholic strength. Low-alcohol wines feel light, sheer and refreshing in the mouth. We call them "light-bodied" wines. Buzz: I'd rather feel light-headed.
FOOD
September 22, 2011
Today Shop, cook and eat with chef Chris Allen of Lotus Farm to Table, who will lead participants through the Media Farmer's Market to pick out fresh items that he will prepare in front of you for the evening's dinner. $55. Meet at 3 p.m. at Lotus Farm to Table, which is a BYOB, 112 W. State St., Media, 610-565-5554, www.lotusfarmtotable.com . Saturday, Sept. 24 Cast Iron Chef , a demonstration featuring experienced hearth cooks who will prepare period-appropriate meals over an open fire or on a hearth with items from a basket of surprise seasonal ingredients.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2011
  With low alcohol and a pleasing, sweet-tart balance, German Riesling is the wine world's version of summer quenchers such as lemonade, margaritas and wheat beers. Clean Slate stands out as much for its value as for its modern packaging. Full of zingy green-apple and jasmine-tea flavors, it's a natural for sweet-tart and spicy foods - think chips and salsa or sweet-and-sour chicken.   - Marnie Old
NEWS
June 5, 2011
Domaine Zind Humbrecht is a name any lover of Alsatian whites should know - especially if you crave the exotic embrace of gewürztraminer. For these opulent beauties, Zind Humbrecht is the best, as evidenced by the 2006 Wintzenheim now on discount for $24.99 in Pennsylvania's online store. But Zind Humbrecht is also a master of Alsatian riesling, considerably drier than its German counterpart, but equally intriguing. Zind's Clos Häuserer 2007, now on 50 percent discount for $29.99, is a perfect example of that.
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