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Ringleader

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NEWS
July 10, 1996 | by Joe O'Dowd, Leon Taylor and Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writers Staff writers Jack McGuire, Kitty Caparella and Marianne Costantinou contributed to this report
Aaron "Little Man" Montague lived fast, played hard and died young. Montague, 26 - suspected of holding the Mantua-Mill Creek area in a vice-like grip of drugs, violence and fear - was killed Monday night when he crashed his car on rain-slicked Germantown Avenue during a desperate, high-speed flight from a team of drug enforcement agents, officials said. Montague was pronounced dead at the scene after his 1988 5.0-liter Mustang slammed into a parked panel truck shortly before 11 p.m. near Pike Street, said Bill Davol, spokesman for the district attorney's office.
NEWS
April 10, 1999 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Four men were placed on probation and fined a total of $17,500 yesterday for running an illegal football pool out of bars and supermarkets in Medford, Medford Lakes, Absecon and Somers Point over a nine-year period. The ringleader, Carl J. Christian, 56, a truck driver who resides in King of Prussia, was sentenced by Superior Court Judge Donald P. Gaydos to three years' probation and fined $10,000. Christian, who has no prior record and who promised to never break the law again, was also ordered to perform 100 hours of community service.
NEWS
September 13, 2001 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A 23-year-old Upland man who was one of the ringleaders of a group that committed 14 holdups at gas stations in suburban communities last year was sentenced yesterday in Delaware County Court to 12 to 24 years in state prison. Edward Laubsch pleaded guilty to 14 counts of robbery as part of a plea agreement that called for his testimony at trial if necessary, Assistant District Attorney Joseph Silvestro said. The four codefendants have all pleaded guilty. Lawrence Bowman, 24, of Brookhaven, the gunman in some of the holdups, pleaded guilty Tuesday to 14 counts of robbery, Silvestro said.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Suddenly last summer, a rapacious band of armed robbers swept through the Northeast, holding up and terrorizing bar owners and patrons in at least six heists. The men would burst in with guns, including the shotgun wielded by the leader, slug patrons and even take a few shots at them, clean out the cash register and the patrons' pockets and run out. Yesterday, the shotgun-brandishing boss was convicted by a Common Pleas Court jury of robbery and aggravated assault charges and charges of trying to kill two police officers while fleeing one of the jobs.
NEWS
August 27, 2004 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 28-year-old Mount Laurel man has pleaded guilty to leading a Burlington County drug gang that annually produced and sold more than $8 million in crack cocaine. Lynch Hunt, of East Daisy Lane, faces at least 10 years in prison for his role as the ringleader. He was charged with conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute more than 50 grams of crack cocaine and more than 500 grams of cocaine. Hunt pleaded guilty Tuesday in federal court in Trenton. Under the deal, he forfeited more than $24,000 seized from personal and business bank accounts, along with two cars.
NEWS
July 6, 2000 | by Regina Medina, Daily News Staff Writer
People who take late-night strolls in Center City to revel in the summer weather - beware. A band of thugs has robbed couples or residents walking alone six times since Sunday, Capt. Thomas Quinn of Central Detectives said yesterday. Even that wasn't enough for the gang, which is also suspected of sexually assaulting another victim early Sunday. The attacks occurred between 9:30 p.m. and the early- morning hours in Old City and Society Hill. In most instances, the victims' have been robbed.
NEWS
August 11, 2000
Back to reality, Philly The convention over, Philly can revert to its usual negativity. Just read Tuesday's (Aug. 8) newspapers: Sixers GM Billy King admits the bad blood is not all Allen Iverson's fault, yet doesn't elaborate who else is at fault and why. District Attorney Lynne Abraham announces that alleged carjacker Thomas Jones had no gun and did not shoot a policeman (the officer was shot by another), yet says nothing about why an unarmed African-American male had to be shot five times and beaten by a gang of policemen.
NEWS
August 11, 2006 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two more teenagers accused of plotting shootings at Winslow Township High School pleaded guilty yesterday, including the 15-year-old whom prosecutors described as the ringleader. The teens' plan was to start a food fight to cause a distraction during a fourth-period lunch; then the ringleader would execute students and teachers from a "hit list" before continuing the rampage off-campus, prosecutors said. That teen, Edwin DeLeon of Winslow, agreed to waive his case to adult court, then pleaded guilty to conspiracy to possess a firearm.
NEWS
March 18, 2008 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The day was winding down at Daroff Elementary School, and the classroom was mostly empty when six boys attacked a fourth-grade girl last month as she emerged from a coat closet. The 10-year-old ringleader pushed her to the floor. Two boys held her down by her arms while the ringleader straddled her. Two other boys kicked and hit her while the sixth pulled her face toward his groin, the 9-year-old girl said. The ringleader and two of the boys who are 10 were later arrested and face several charges in juvenile court, including simple, aggravated and indecent assault.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
'Maestro, what's going on?" someone asks Walter Garber - looking a lot like Denzel Washington as he casts a puzzled gaze at the giant computerized board in New York's Rail Center headquarters, its lights indicating a Lexington Avenue train stopped on the tracks. What's going on? Try a remake of The Taking of Pelham 123, the 1974 hostage drama in which a band of bad guys with funny mustaches take control of a subway car, terrorizing its passengers and giving the city a mere 60 minutes to deliver a ransom.
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NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FEDERAL JUDGE yesterday denied bail to ex-narcotics cop Thomas Liciardello, finding evidence that he was the "de facto leader" of an alleged group of rogue cops, and that he could pose a danger to the community. After U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno ordered him held pending trial on racketeering-conspiracy and robbery charges, Liciardello, 38, looked back toward his wife, Selena, a Philly police officer, and mouthed: "Stay strong. " His wife, who shook as she sat in the gallery next to his mother and stepfather, later cried outside the courtroom.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The purported ringleader of what authorities have described as a rogue group of Philadelphia narcotics officers will remain behind bars pending his trial, a federal judge ruled Wednesday. The ruling, by U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno, came a day after a hearing in which federal authorities detailed a series of incidents in which Officer Thomas Liciardello, 38, allegedly outed informants and threatened those who spoke out against them. Assistant U.S. Attorney Anthony Wzorek cited the incidents as examples of the danger Liciardello would pose to government witnesses should he be released on bail.
NEWS
August 14, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FEDERAL JUDGE is expected to rule this afternoon on whether ex-narcotics cop Thomas Liciardello - whom the feds have called the "ringleader" of a rogue group of cops - should be granted bail. U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno yesterday heard an hour and a half of arguments and testimony about Liciardello. The government contends that Liciardello, 38, intimidated witnesses and alleged victims, and even threatened a lawyer. His attorney says he didn't intimidate anyone. Liciardello and five other ex-narcotics cops were arrested two weeks ago on a 26-count indictment charging them with racketeering conspiracy, robbery and related offenses.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mutrel Stuckey walked slowly, almost gingerly, to the witness stand. Three years ago, he was shot in the back running from a robber who stormed his van as Stuckey parked near his Southwest Philadelphia home. Stuckey, then 49, was hospitalized for a month and bedridden for three more. "I'm still in constant pain," he told a jury last month. Stuckey said he didn't know his shooter or why he was targeted. Agents later identified the alleged gunman as Ramel Moten, a fixture in the nearby Bartram Village Housing Development.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Ben Fox, Associated Press
GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba - The self-styled terrorist mastermind of the 9/11 attacks lectured a military court on government hypocrisy Wednesday and wore a previously banned camouflage vest to his pretrial hearing before being rebuked by the judge for his comments. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was in court as part of a weeklong hearing focusing largely on the secrecy rules that will govern legal proceedings against him at the U.S. base in Cuba. Mohammed was allowed to wear a hunting-style camouflage vest with his white tunic and turban over the objections of prosecutors, who feared it might disrupt the proceedings.
NEWS
April 14, 2011
A MONTH out from what could be a very important primary, most of you are following the Phillies, Sixers and Flyers a lot closer than the city election. (If you are reading this in the suburbs, you may tear out this page and add it to the mulch pile while letting out the cat.) Nothing usually surprises me about Philadelphia politics, but this cycle some politicians have opened a new can of crazy. Usually, it's the Democrats, God's Unchosen People, who run the circus because Philadelphia is a Wholly Owned Subsidiary of the Democratic Party®.
NEWS
May 18, 2010 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After being described by a prosecutor as a "leech" who is "sociopathic," "greedy, unrepentant, and pathologically indifferent" to other humans, professional thief Scott A. Hornick was given the really bad news: He'll likely spend most of the rest of his life in prison. Hornick, 38, was sentenced Monday to 27 years for running a burglary ring from 2001 to 2007 while he was also wanted for escaping from a New Jersey jail. He robbed at least 150 businesses in 13 states. "It's about time you are off the streets for a good long time," said U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III. He told Hornick, who lived in Raritan, N.J., that his criminal history was "off the charts.
NEWS
May 18, 2010 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
After being described by a prosecutor as a "leech" who is "sociopathic," "greedy, unrepentant, and pathologically indifferent" to other humans, professional thief Scott A. Hornick was given the really bad news: He'll likely spend most of the rest of his life in prison. Hornick, 38, was sentenced Monday to 27 years for running a burglary ring from 2001 to 2007 while he was also wanted for escaping from a New Jersey jail. He robbed at least 150 businesses in 13 states. "It's about time you are off the streets for a good long time," said U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III. He told Hornick, who lived in Raritan, N.J., that his criminal history was "off the charts.
NEWS
January 21, 2010 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert Eatman said yesterday that he would have been a poor ringleader for the home-invasion robbery in which Korean businessman Robert Chae was killed last year, countering attempts to blame him. He weighed more than 400 pounds, he said. And he needed a cane to move around, stiffly, after being shot eight times in 2007. After a methodical trudge to the witness stand in a Montgomery County courtroom yesterday, Eatman - down to 310 after a year in jail - named Joseph Page, Amatadi Latham, and Karre Pitts as the attackers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
'Maestro, what's going on?" someone asks Walter Garber - looking a lot like Denzel Washington as he casts a puzzled gaze at the giant computerized board in New York's Rail Center headquarters, its lights indicating a Lexington Avenue train stopped on the tracks. What's going on? Try a remake of The Taking of Pelham 123, the 1974 hostage drama in which a band of bad guys with funny mustaches take control of a subway car, terrorizing its passengers and giving the city a mere 60 minutes to deliver a ransom.
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