FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 10, 2009 | By Elizabeth Wellington, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Fall is fashion's most exciting time of year. But it also raises the most questions: What's the in shoe? Will belts be important? Are we still in a dress season? So, to guide us, I asked some of New York's hottest designers: Isaac Mizrahi, the man who chic-ified Target and stars in the brand-new Bravo reality series The Fashion Show ; Jason Wu, best known for his soon-to- inhabit-the-Smithsonian inaugural gown for first lady Michelle Obama; and Tracy Reese, the delicate hand behind Plenty and her girly self-named label.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by Michael S. Wirtz
When only four members of the Housing Authority Choir could attend a concert at Katie B. Jackson Plaza, the event became a sing-along. "They did fantastic," said choir director Val Yancey.
NEWS
November 22, 1986
In the Nov. 2 Inquirer, two areas of the city were written about, Northern Liberties and Ludlow. Northern Liberties was depicted as a community on the rise. The houses are being renovated and sold to new people, new businesses are cropping up, and a new spirit is evident everywhere. In sharp, bitter contrast, Ludlow is shown to be the pits - poor housing, poor people and above all a complete poverty of spirit. Here is where I must differ. We are not about to roll over and play dead; we do have plans for Ludlow.
NEWS
February 19, 1987 | By Lou Perfidio, Special to The Inquirer
Upper Dublin Police Chief Raymond Polett said in his monthly report to the Township Committee on Public Safety, Works and Services that the number of accidents and injuries on Upper Dublin roads in January was the highest in 18 months. Polett told the panel, a subcommittee of the Board of Commissioners, on Tuesday night that the increase was due to hazardous road conditions caused by two major snowstorms last month. He said the danger was compounded by a lack of snow tires and chains on many cars.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1993 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia Suburban Corp., the Bryn Mawr utility whose chief subsidiary is the Philadelphia Suburban Water Co., reported that water sales increased 8 percent during the parched summer, leading to the company's "strongest quarter in recent history. " Earnings per share from continuing operations increased about 9 percent because the number of outstanding shares increased by 2.6 million since last year, primarily through customer stock purchases. The profits contrast starkly with the company's performance last year, when it reported hefty losses in the third quarter, largely thanks to a $5.5 million loss when the company shedded three unprofitable nonutility subsidiaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2000 | By Nick Cristiano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Though his albums have built him a reputation as one of the most exciting young guitarists to emerge from the Chicago blues scene in some time, Melvin Taylor is still not as well-known in his homeland as he should be. Until the current U.S. tour that is bringing him to Philadelphia this weekend, the singer-guitarist had performed only in Europe and on his home turf on the Windy City's West Side. On his latest CD, Bang That Bell (Evidence), Taylor again offers a thrilling combination of incendiary technique and soul-deep feeling, stretching the boundaries of the blues to take in elements of jazz, funk and rock.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / VICKI VALERIO
The Philadelphia International Women's Show got underway yesterday at the Convention Center and continues through Sunday. The gathering provides a forum to trade ideas and a chance to shop, eat and have fun. Advance tickets are $6. Admission at the door is $7.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | By Gina Esposito, Special to The Inquirer
Homeowners in Lansdowne Borough will be paying $37.60 more in property taxes in 1990 on a home assessed at the borough average under a final budget adopted Wednesday. The budget, with expenditures of $3,357,191, calls for a 11.57-mill rise in the property tax rate, from 116.68 in 1989 to 128.25 in 1990. The budget will rise $231,998, or 7.4 percent, in 1990 from the 1989 total of $3,125,193. The rise is due to overall increases in borough contracts. Taxes on a home assessed at the borough average of $3,250 will be $416.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 24, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia hosted 8 percent fewer international travelers last year, but is expecting a surge from the upcoming World Meeting of Families and papal visit, convention officials said Monday. The Department of Commerce, which measures overseas visitors to U.S. cities and states, said Philadelphia drew 620,000 foreign visitors in 2014, down from 673,000 in 2013. The city ranked No. 15 among the 20 most popular U.S. destinations. Pennsylvania ranked No. 10 in foreign visitors, with 964,000 international travelers, down 3 percent from the 993,000 in 2013.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Several decades after Schubert's death at age 31, the composer became the subject of an eponymous operetta by Franz von Suppé. Maybe there's just something too tempting about genius cut short to let it sit there unexploited, which is the dynamic at work in Charlie Parker's Yardbird , given its world premiere by Opera Philadelphia on Friday night at the Kimmel's Perelman Theater. To loosely quote a melding of last lines of several characters in this chamber opera: Parker's music echoes as the unfinished symphony of a beautiful mind.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samantha Pellicciotti isn't sure why she's not furious. She has plenty of reasons to be: the parents who were too drunk and too high to care for her properly, the sexual assault by someone she trusted, the succession of foster homes and string of disappointments. But the 18-year-old poised to graduate next week as valedictorian of Roxborough High School with a 4.0 GPA and a bouquet of scholarships holds remarkably little rancor. She's moving forward because that's the only path she allows herself to see. "I'm lucky I'm strong," she said.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
At first blush, this is a headline screamer: Philadelphia region brings up the bottom in job recovery. How bad is it? So bad that the region's wretched post-recession job-growth performance makes the beleaguered city of Detroit look like a rock star, based on a Pew Trust analysis of U.S. Labor Department Statistics. Of the nation's 50 top metropolitan regions, Philadelphia ranked 47th, with 4.7 percent increase in jobs since the darkest days of the recession. At the top, San Jose, Calif., grew 23.7 percent, followed by Austin, Texas, at 22.6 percent, and Nashville at 19.3 percent.
NEWS
June 2, 2015
A NEW STUDY showing that the suicide rate among black children ages 5 to 11 has nearly doubled since the early 1990s, while the rate for white children has declined, should be heard as a "call to action. " Those are the words of Sean Joe, a professor of social work at Washington University who studies suicide among black youth. Joe did not participate in the new study, done by experts at the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. The study was published last week in the journal JAMA Pediatrics . Joe said the climbing rate of suicides among African-American children is "alarming, disturbing . . . shocking.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's no reason to beat around the bush: Texas Rising , History's five-part mini-series about the Texas Revolution, has to be one of the strangest, most idiosyncratic dramas on TV since Twin Peaks . An odd hybrid between the western and the historical saga, the dramatic and the comedic, Texas Rising is about the bloody war waged in 1835 and 1836 by Texians (as they referred to themselves) to free the territory from the Mexican Empire. Richly textured and enjoyable if wildly uneven, the star-studded series tries to marry the hard-nosed, brutally violent realism of modern TV     to an antique - some would say antiquated - aesthetic of genteel mannerisms and off-the-wall humor prevalent during the first golden age of TV in the 1950s and '60s.
SPORTS
May 20, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
BRETT BROWN has experienced the anxiety of the ride to numerous NBA championships. There were many plays, games and series that had coach Gregg Popovich and his staff missing many hours of sleep en route to five titles in 16 years. Still, Brown's most anxious times coaching in the NBA have been during the past two Mays. While that is playoff time for the Spurs, it has been draft lottery time for the 76ers under his watch, with the Sixers finishing with the second-worst record in the league a year ago (when they drafted Joel Embiid with the No. 3 pick)
NEWS
May 9, 2015 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
Spenser Gray says she's known since she was seven years old: it would be her class that was going to be the one to change the Quakertown softball program. With five starters as members of the class of 2016 - including Gray - the Quakertown third baseman is starting to look prophetic. That junior class stepped up for Panthers in a 5-2 victory over Central Bucks East on Thursday afternoon in a Suburban One Continental game. It was the third straight win for the Panthers (8-8 overall, 4-8 league)
SPORTS
May 9, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Too often, heavyweight Joey Dawejko had to make a choice. He'd just spent another 10-12 hours on top of a roof, with nowhere to hide from the unforgiving summer sun. Scorched and exhausted, Dawejko would get home around 9:30 p.m. knowing he needed to rise by 3:30 a.m. to do his roadwork. Should he sleep and recover? After all, at the time he had two children - he has three now - to feed. Or should he continue to break his body down with early morning runs and sparring as the once-promising amateur heavyweight chased what appeared to be a fading dream?
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Victoria Mier and John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writers
Picture this: The idyllic New England coast. A young couple in love, walking in the sunshine, arms around each other. Something small and black is zipping across the blue sky. It's a drone, carrying very important cargo: a diamond ring. How else would Andrew Mudge, owner of Black Kettle Films and avid drone enthusiast, propose to his girlfriend, Sophie Lehar? "It's futuristic, but it's also romantic," Mudge said. "We'll always have that fun story. And, why not propose with a flying drone?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|