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Risk Factors

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013 | By Kimberly Garrison
1 OBESITY Carrying extra pounds is a risk factor for nearly every preventable disease. No, it's not about being skinny - and it's not about being obese. It's about being at an optimal, healthy weight for your height. Forget the BMI and just look at yourself in a full-length mirror naked. 2 PHYSICAL INACTIVITY Don't worry about running a marathon. Just commit to walking every day for a minimum of 30 minutes and doing a few calisthenics in your bedroom. It doesn't have to be complicated.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite the economic good times, 9.2 million American children - one in seven - are in serious distress and at risk of having continuing problems later in life. These youngsters are at risk not just for one reason, but for many. What makes their situation especially dire is that each is burdened with four or more measurable risk factors, as identified by the Annie E. Casey Foundation in its new Kids Count Data Book, which was released today. The factors are: the child is growing up in a single-parent home; the household head does not have a high school diploma; family income is below the poverty line; a parent does not have steady full-time employment; the family is receiving welfare benefits; and the child lacks health insurance.
NEWS
May 29, 2016
Q. My parents are getting older and seem a little wobbly. They insist they are fine, but are there signs I can look for? A. As you age, several factors can cause poor balance and put you at risk for a fall. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in three people age 65 and older fall each year, but fewer than half tell their doctor. One in five falls causes a serious injury, such as broken bones or head injuries. Among older adults, falls are the number-one cause of fractures, hospital admissions for trauma, loss of independence and injury deaths.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | by Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writer
Ahlayshia Holmes. Amire Lowe. Charnae Wise. Raymond Graves. These young Philadelphians all died this year, allegedly at the hands of adult relatives. Though the abuse they suffered is extreme compared to what social workers normally encounter, it is still indicative of the harsh realities that thousands of city preschoolers face day in and day out. According to a new city-commissioned report, an alarmingly large number of young children are exposed to myriad risk factors that keep them from excelling once they begin school.
NEWS
May 24, 1999 | BY MICHAEL P. ERIKSEN
Jeff Jacoby (column, May 12) challenges the science used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to estimate how many people die from cigarette smoking each year in the United States. The column was based on an article by Robert Levy and Rosalind Marimont in Regulation magazine, which contains numerous errors about the harm of smoking. Levy and Marimont claim the government counts as a smoking-related death all smokers who die from a certain disease, even if they had other risk factors.
NEWS
November 22, 1994 | BY CAROL DAHLGREN
Every year, more than 45,000 American women die from breast cancer. Seventy-five percent of those women have no risk factors. These women are among the most susceptible to the disease because they feel that since they have no risk factors, they are immune. Because of this false sense of security, these and many more women will die from breast cancer this year, although they could greatly increase their chances of survival by taking a few minutes out of their routines to conduct breast examinations.
NEWS
December 17, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
THE SPORTING LIFE What is this? Runners swilling beer after an important race? Yes, but it is nonalcoholic beer that runners increasingly are reaching for after they hit the finish line, Runner's World magazine reports. Not only are such brews palatable and refreshing, they also supply needed carbohydrates and fluids. The alcohol in regular beer acts as a diuretic, but nonalcoholic beer, which is less than 0.5 percent alcohol, does not leave you dry or drunk, the magazine says.
NEWS
February 24, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Baldness can be bad for your heart. That's the conclusion of a report published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. That baldness is bad for the heart is no secret to thousands of lighter- on-top men toiling in the singles bars and computer dating files of America. But romance isn't the interest of the JAMA report. Dr. Samuel M. Lesko of Boston University School of Medicine studied 1,437 men ages 21 to 54 at 35 New England hospitals and found that men with male- pattern baldness may face a "modest" increased risk of heart attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013
FORMER ATHLETE-turned-restaurant manager Stephanie Varela, 29, attributed her sweating, shortness of breath and slight chest pains to the stress of hard work and rushing around. Neither she nor the paramedics would realize she was having a heart attack. It happened on a Saturday evening last September, the Philadelphia resident recalled recently. "I was on the phone trying to calm down an irate guest, and the minute I hung up, it felt like someone was sitting on my chest. I felt this stabbing pain in my shoulder that traveled down to my arm, elbow and finally to my fingers, which went numb.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013
AS WE celebrate Valentine's Day on Thursday, this is an opportune time to talk heart health with the ones we love. Just in case you need a little reminder, the No. 1 silent killer of all Americans, regardless of education, race or social-economic status, is coronary heart disease, the result of plaque blockages in the arteries that supply oxygen to the heart. Approximately every 30 seconds, an American is stricken with some kind of coronary event, according to the American Heart Association.
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NEWS
May 29, 2016
Q. My parents are getting older and seem a little wobbly. They insist they are fine, but are there signs I can look for? A. As you age, several factors can cause poor balance and put you at risk for a fall. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in three people age 65 and older fall each year, but fewer than half tell their doctor. One in five falls causes a serious injury, such as broken bones or head injuries. Among older adults, falls are the number-one cause of fractures, hospital admissions for trauma, loss of independence and injury deaths.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
The table below shows the proportion of children under 7 (under 6 in New Jersey) whose tests showed elevated blood lead levels in selected Pennsylvania and New Jersey cities in 2014. Cities were selected for analysis because of their risk factors for lead poisoning: high proportions of children under 7, families with low income, and older housing. In Flint, Mich., 3,340 children under the age of 6 were tested in 2015. Of those children, 112, or 3.3 percent, had elevated levels of lead.
NEWS
January 10, 2016
Q: What are the signs and symptoms of hypothermia? A: As the weather gets colder, our risk for hypothermia increases. It occurs when body temperature (normally 98.6 degrees) drops below 95 degrees. If the body is not properly insulated, hypothermia can develop in a matter of hours. Symptoms of hypothermia include poor judgment, confusion, and difficulty maintaining balance. As hypothermia progresses, shivering will stop as the body tries to conserve energy. In some cases, people may begin to feel very warm and remove their clothing in a phenomenon called "paradoxical undressing.
SPORTS
September 30, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
They were just unpacking the GPS devices from the boxes in Penn's basketball offices. For their cars? No, for practice. Every Quakers men's hoops player is going to get a tracking device for the back of his jersey. It weighs about an ounce. "I don't know if we're allowed to wear them in games or not," said men's basketball coach Steve Donahue. "We're trying to figure that out. " Miles toiled will be added to a database that closely monitors sleep and nutrition and - here's where things really get state-of-the-art - individual traits such as load and explode and drive abilities.
NEWS
October 22, 2014
ISSUE | RACY E-MAIL With robes, change Courtesy of Justice Seamus P. McCaffery, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court has become a laughingstock anew, a comedian's punchline ("Swift justice," Oct. 17). McCaffery, a former Philadelphia police officer, asserts that coarse language and crude jokes were part and parcel of his former job. I do not doubt it, but that type of comportment is something that a Supreme Court justice must shed long before ascending to the bench. |Oren M. Spiegler, Upper St. Clair Didn't even peek?
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Using caffeine to treat premature newborns for apnea - dangerous pauses in breathing during sleep - does not have long-term harmful effects on their sleep or breathing patterns, according to research led by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. But the new study also found that prematurity itself is a risk factor for sleep disorders years later. Children born preterm had high rates of obstructive sleep apnea and periodic limb movement during sleep, whether or not they had caffeine therapy in the neonatal intensive care unit.
NEWS
February 2, 2014 | By Meeri Kim, For The Inquirer
Since the 1960s, the number of people dying from heart disease has fallen steadily in the United States. But heart disease is still responsible for a quarter of all deaths, and remains the leading cause of mortality for both men and women. Innovations in care and more insight into risk factors has helped lessen its damaging impact. One insight is that many people can control their risk. Most heart disease is preventable, but "we don't pay attention to that disease process" until it's too advanced, said Daniel Edmundowicz, medical director of the Temple Heart and Vascular Institute in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 1, 2013 | By Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
The word pediatrician conjures up Norman Rockwell-like images of a doctor listening to the heart of a child's doll. We tend to be a happy crew: treating newborns with unlimited potential, struggling with teens as they figure out who they are. That's the good stuff. But there's a darker side of pediatrics. It rears up when a child removes his shirt for an exam and has telltale bruises. Or when a child flinches each time a parent moves suddenly. Recently, as I was preparing for patients, I noticed a consult report on an 8-year-old boy whom I have been caring for since birth.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013
FORMER ATHLETE-turned-restaurant manager Stephanie Varela, 29, attributed her sweating, shortness of breath and slight chest pains to the stress of hard work and rushing around. Neither she nor the paramedics would realize she was having a heart attack. It happened on a Saturday evening last September, the Philadelphia resident recalled recently. "I was on the phone trying to calm down an irate guest, and the minute I hung up, it felt like someone was sitting on my chest. I felt this stabbing pain in my shoulder that traveled down to my arm, elbow and finally to my fingers, which went numb.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013 | By Kimberly Garrison
1 OBESITY Carrying extra pounds is a risk factor for nearly every preventable disease. No, it's not about being skinny - and it's not about being obese. It's about being at an optimal, healthy weight for your height. Forget the BMI and just look at yourself in a full-length mirror naked. 2 PHYSICAL INACTIVITY Don't worry about running a marathon. Just commit to walking every day for a minimum of 30 minutes and doing a few calisthenics in your bedroom. It doesn't have to be complicated.
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