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NEWS
December 8, 2004 | By Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A rusty pipe did it. The Coast Guard said yesterday that a cast-iron pipe sticking up from the bottom of the Delaware River lanced the steel hull of the Athos I just as the Greek oil tanker prepared to dock, causing one of the worst oil spills - if not the worst - in the river's history. Investigators said they had found the U-shaped pipe jutting 3 feet from the river bottom about 700 feet from a marine terminal owned by Citgo Petroleum Corp. in West Deptford. But as one question was answered 12 days after the environmental disaster unfolded, others emerged in an investigation that is expected to last months.
NEWS
May 28, 2002 | By Dan Hardy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Here's what most people see when they visit Market Square Memorial Park in Marcus Hook, a tiny patch of green squeezed between two huge refineries: Jumbo tankers and cargo vessels plying the Delaware River. Washed-up plastic bottles. And lots and lots of marine debris - thick mooring rope, rusted cable, driftwood. But when John McNally, an unemployed electrician and amateur marine archaeologist from nearby Wallingford, looks out at the river, he sees something altogether different: Marauding pirates.
NEWS
September 28, 2007 | By Alex Seise INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The monthlong emergency deepening of the Delaware River shipping channel finished this week and tons of dredge spoil have been dumped in a park at the foot of the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge. The controversial project, which environmentalists feared would harm Palmyra Cove Nature Park in Burlington County, ends with more than 10 park acres covered with muck pulled from the river bottom. The spoil, surrounded by earthen berms, covers a park wetlands area near Dragonfly Pond with a thick layer of sandy soil specked with small shells and rocks.
NEWS
January 26, 2005 | By Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The owner and operator of a Greek tanker that spewed an estimated 265,000 gallons of oil into the Delaware River have filed a petition in federal court seeking to thwart - or at least limit - any damage claims not related to oil pollution. The petition was filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia by Frescati Shipping Co. Ltd., owner of the Athos I, and Tsakos Shipping & Trading S.A., the ship's operator. The action is one piece of a legal strategy to control expenses for a spill that has cost millions to clean up. Citing 154-year-old maritime law, the petition asks a judge for "exoneration" from any liability unrelated to oil pollution, or at least a $5 million cap on total awards - the proposed value of the damaged tanker.
NEWS
January 21, 2006 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At first, officials said they might never know exactly why the Athos I spilled 264,000 gallons of crude oil into the Delaware River in November 2004. But yesterday, the U.S. Coast Guard officially announced the end of the mystery, saying a submerged 18,000-pound anchor of unknown origin caused the gash in the hulking Greek tanker. The other objects that had been suspected in one of the worst accidents ever on the Delaware River - a pump casing, a large concrete block, an 11-ton propeller - have been cleared of all charges.
NEWS
September 27, 1999 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
The controversial Delaware River dredging project could move closer to reality if the U.S. Senate this month approves funding for the project's next phase. During a House and Senate conference on the Energy and Water Appropriations bill last Friday, a move was made to diminish funding for the dredging project. But Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., who has vowed to fight to ensure funding for the project, says he was successful in doubling the conference amount to $10 million. "I'm optimistic we'll be able to keep our $10 million figure," Specter said yesterday at a press conference he called at the Packer Avenue Marine Terminal.
NEWS
May 28, 2002 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police yesterday continued their search of the Delaware River in the city's Holmesburg section for the body of a 16-year-old Northeast Philadelphia youth believed to have drowned after he jumped into the river Sunday evening. While apprehensive family members watched, city police Marine Unit officers operating a sophisticated, remote-control submersible camera, scoured the murky river bottom at the base of a sprawling, abandoned cargo pier near the foot of Rhawn Street for Christopher Swartz.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bill Cavanaugh was lying in the Delaware River the other day, about 50 yards from the bank. Stone dry. All around him as he worked, there was no river in the river. There was a hole in the river. No, not a hole in the river bottom. A hole in the flow. As long as a football field. And from that hole hangs a tale. North of the footbridge that connects Lumberville, Bucks County, with Bulls Island, Hunterdon County, a repair crew during the summer had built a dam to expose the river bottom.
NEWS
April 19, 2006 | By Tina Moore and Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Rendell's move to temporarily halt all development on portions of the Delaware River in Philadelphia could affect the plans of at least two casino groups seeking to build slots parlors on the waterfront. Foxwoods Casino Philadelphia and SugarHouse Casino, two of five applicants vying for a slots license in the city, said they might have to alter their development plans for slots parlors, which have already been submitted to the state's Gaming Control Board for approval. Aside from casinos, at least two proposed condominium towers, as well as a residential and hotel project, could be put on hold, according to state officials.
NEWS
June 26, 1989 | By Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
Saturday's 800,000-gallon oil spill in the Delaware River was the fourth major spill on the river since 1985 and one of the largest ever. On Sept. 28, 1985, the Panamanian tanker Grand Eagle ran aground near Marcus Hook after its engines failed, dumping 435,000 gallons of crude oil into the river. It took 39 days and cost $1 million to clean the oil from a 15-mile stretch of the river. Thousands of birds and other wildflife were killed. A second major spill occurred six months later when an estimated 189,000 gallons of crude gushed from the tanker Intermar Alliance after it rammed a pier at a Marcus Hook refinery on March 21, 1986.
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NEWS
May 8, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
LT. ANDREW Napoli spends most of his day riding up and down the city's rivers. But it's no pleasure cruise - he's looking for threats to the safety of Penn's Landing and other waterfront properties. Oh, and dead bodies. "Spring is one of our busier seasons," Napoli, who leads the Police Department's Marine Unit, said during a recent patrol along the Delaware River. "Because the water is so cold, the bodies don't decompose, and they sink to the river bottom. "So in the spring, when the water warms, they start to surface.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2012 | By Jim Suhr and Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Barge operators along a key stretch of the Mississippi River braced Monday for months of restricted shipping as crews prepared to begin blasting large rock formations impeding navigation on the drought-plagued waterway. Contractors could begin drilling holes into troublesome river bedrock south of St. Louis and detonating explosives as early as Tuesday, the Army Corps of Engineers said. Demolition of the massive formations near Thebes, Ill., coincides with an unusual move by the agency to release water from a southern Illinois lake, adding a few inches of depth to a river that is getting lower by the day - largely because of the lingering effects of the worst drought in decades.
NEWS
June 15, 2008 | By Calvin Sandborn
Today I'll think fondly of Dad. Which is odd, because I used to hate him. Dad was an angry, hard-swearing, tattooed man's man. He'd once been an Alaska bush pilot, but I remember a California traveling salesman, drinking himself to death. When I was 2 he threw my empty crib across the room. When I was 12, he picked a fistfight with my brother. He routinely shouted at us in front of friends. By the time I was 13, I wished he would die. And then he did. I thought I had killed him and became terrified I would damage others.
NEWS
November 15, 2007 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a small survey boat, maritime archaeologist J. Lee Cox Jr. was checking the bottom of the Delaware River at the Sunoco Logistics pier in South Philadelphia when he got a hit on the side-scan sonar. A pipe? A log? A hazard to the oil tankers docking nearby? No one was sure until a diver was sent down weeks later and found a strange pointed object buried in the muck about 40 feet down. This week, Cox identified it as the business end of a cheval-de-frise, an iron-tipped log once embedded in the river, along with many others, to gore the hulls of British warships menacing Philadelphia in the mid-1770s.
NEWS
September 28, 2007 | By Alex Seise INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The monthlong emergency deepening of the Delaware River shipping channel finished this week and tons of dredge spoil have been dumped in a park at the foot of the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge. The controversial project, which environmentalists feared would harm Palmyra Cove Nature Park in Burlington County, ends with more than 10 park acres covered with muck pulled from the river bottom. The spoil, surrounded by earthen berms, covers a park wetlands area near Dragonfly Pond with a thick layer of sandy soil specked with small shells and rocks.
NEWS
April 23, 2006 | By Tina Moore and Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Quickie deals in Harrisburg that drop valuable riverbed property into the laps of private developers for next to nothing will be a thing of the past, if a handful of elected officials prevail. Their concerns - as well as a flurry of interest in building along the Delaware River in Philadelphia - culminated in Gov. Rendell's call more than a week ago for a moratorium on development along the river's banks. Rendell, State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo (D., Phila.), and other lawmakers said they thought they needed to pause the state's practice of transferring so-called riparian rights - rights to the Delaware's river-bottom - to developers.
NEWS
April 19, 2006 | By Tina Moore and Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Rendell's move to temporarily halt all development on portions of the Delaware River in Philadelphia could affect the plans of at least two casino groups seeking to build slots parlors on the waterfront. Foxwoods Casino Philadelphia and SugarHouse Casino, two of five applicants vying for a slots license in the city, said they might have to alter their development plans for slots parlors, which have already been submitted to the state's Gaming Control Board for approval. Aside from casinos, at least two proposed condominium towers, as well as a residential and hotel project, could be put on hold, according to state officials.
NEWS
March 13, 2006 | By Leonard N. Fleming INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The divisions run deep in the debate over whether dredging the Delaware River shipping channel is an environmental risk or an exaggerated fear. Along with disagreement over the economic worth of the $300 to $500 million project, environmental hazards that some say dredging poses have helped shelve the project for more than a decade. But with Gov. Rendell, who supports the plan, forcing a showdown with New Jersey foes by holding up the Delaware River Port Authority's budget, the complicated and conflicting environmental analyses of the river have returned to the forefront of the long-standing dispute.
NEWS
January 21, 2006 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At first, officials said they might never know exactly why the Athos I spilled 264,000 gallons of crude oil into the Delaware River in November 2004. But yesterday, the U.S. Coast Guard officially announced the end of the mystery, saying a submerged 18,000-pound anchor of unknown origin caused the gash in the hulking Greek tanker. The other objects that had been suspected in one of the worst accidents ever on the Delaware River - a pump casing, a large concrete block, an 11-ton propeller - have been cleared of all charges.
NEWS
December 30, 2005 | By Mario F. Cattabiani and Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
An agitated Gov. Rendell yesterday reiterated his warning that if New Jersey does not agree to deepen the Delaware River shipping channel, he will allow the PATCO High-Speed Line to shut down. That led New Jersey's top leader on the Delaware River Port Authority to say that Rendell was acting like a "bully" and that his state would never permit a line used by 35,000 daily commuters to stop rolling. Also yesterday, two Pennsylvania politicians weighed in on the escalating dispute, but were split on how to resolve it. House Speaker John M. Perzel (R., Phila.
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