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River Line

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NEWS
May 14, 2010 | By Darran Simon INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A southbound River Line train struck a minivan at a Riverton railroad crossing Thursday, seriously injuring the vehicle's driver, according to authorities. The minivan, carrying two adults and an infant, was traveling north on River Road, parallel to the tracks, when it turned into the path of the train at Main Street shortly before 11 a.m., NJ Transit spokesman Dan Stessel said. The crossing gates were down, and red lights were flashing, Stessel said. A red light at the intersection and an illuminated no-right-turn symbol also were activated, he said.
NEWS
June 13, 2005 | By John Timpane
I've ridden the River Line almost since it opened, from Trenton to Camden a lot of days, and I've been listening to what riders say. I've heard this a lot: "It's great. You can ride for two hours anywhere, $1.10. " And more than once I've heard another comment: "They didn't want us to have it. " They refers to white people; us refers to - you can guess. Let's admit two things: One, this perception is exaggerated, and two, there is some truth to it. The NIMBY resistance to the River Line had a large component of class and race.
NEWS
April 18, 2004 | By Frank Kummer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dolly DeFreitas, who works the counter at Zena's Patisserie & Cafe in Riverton, is so impressed with customer flow from the new rail line that she plans to open a farmers' market nearby. "I think it's fantastic," DeFreitas says of the River Line, which has been open for a month. "For a Victorian town, you can't get any more nostalgic. There was so much conflict about this before. Neighbor was against neighbor. But it's been a relief that it's been so positive so far. " There are ample signs that the new River Line has brought a sense of life to aging towns that hug the Delaware River.
NEWS
October 27, 2005 | By Donald Nigro
The NJ Transit Camden-Trenton River Line, up and running for about a year and a half, continues to increase in popularity. Ridership is up 29 percent from last year, with more than 6,000 passengers a day. This is helped in no small part by the line's low fares and the region's ever-increasing gasoline prices. Unsupported fears of the River Line during the 1990s have proved wrong: It is clear that trains are not running over children, tying up traffic, or providing transportation for burglars.
NEWS
April 16, 2011
A New Jersey Transit River Line train struck a man lying on the tracks Friday night, according to a spokesman. The 40-year-old was struck by a southbound train about 9:50 p.m. near the Cooperstown Road crossing in Delanco, spokesman Dan Stessel said. He was flown by helicopter to Cooper University Hospital in Camden for treatment. Stessel said Saturday he did not know the condition of the victim, whose name he withheld, and said it was not clear why he was lying on the tracks.
NEWS
July 13, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A $32 million Pennsauken train station to link the Atlantic City Line and the River Line got a boost Wednesday when the NJ Transit board approved construction of the final phase. The board approved a $13.8 million contract with Terminal Construction Corp. of Wood-Ridge, N.J., which will build platforms, a parking lot, drainage improvements, and customer services. The new Pennsauken Transit Center, a two-level station near Derousse Avenue west of River Road, will allow direct transfers between trains on the east-west Atlantic City Line and the north-south River Line.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
One man who traveled on the River Line twice shoplifted cans of Red Bull from a convenience store in Palmyra and used the light-rail line for getaways. Others have been arrested for offenses such as disorderly conduct and trespassing. To stem such quality-of-life crimes committed in the river towns in Burlington County served by the eight-year-old line, NJ Transit police and officers from 10 towns have joined forces to patrol platforms and trains. The task force has been in operation since September.
NEWS
May 3, 2004 | By Sally Friedman
It was a morning soggy with rain, the kind that makes you want to burrow under the covers and stay there. But we had big plans. This was the Tuesday we were to flex our travel muscles and ride the rails on our maiden voyage on the River Line. Our ultimate destination: New York City. Our immediate destination: Riverside. I had last gone to Riverside to meet a friend at a little sandwich shop where the veggie burgers are terrific. That was more than a year ago. My husband mused, as we left Moorestown and drove on Bridgeboro Road, that he couldn't remember the last time he had hit this little river town.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
PENNSAUKEN The new $40 million train station in Pennsauken is slated to open next month to link the River Line and the Atlantic City line. The multilevel Pennsauken Transit Center, near Derousse Avenue west of River Road, will allow direct transfers between trains on the east-west Atlantic City Rail Line and the north-south River Line. Pennsauken Township Manager Ed Grochowski said Oct. 13 "is the date we're being told," although NJ Transit spokesman John Durso Jr. said Monday that "we have not finalized rail schedules, and a start date has not yet been finalized.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
"Almost an island" is how Joseph Busler describes tucked-away Delanco, the quiet Burlington County township he's called home since 2003. "We've got the Rancocas Creek on one side and the Delaware River on another," says the retired newspaperman, 71. "And along the railroad track is a long narrow strip of water called Nellie's Pond. " Referred to as "haunted" in online guides to New Jersey's spookiest places, the otherwise unremarkable pond has less impact on Delanco's sense of place than the creek and the river.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com,215-854-4890
A REGIONAL rail power failure left local travelers scrambling for another way home yesterday. "I'll give you a cannoli for a ride home," said Maryanne Lalli of Bristol, Bucks County. She scored a free loaf of bread from one of the shops in Reading Terminal Market because the loaf was a little bit crushed. Lalli, her husband and his parents made their way to the Philadelphia Flower Show at the Pennsylvania Convention Center because they had a day off thanks to the snow. "We figured it would be less crowded than the weekend," she said.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. If a wealthy descendant of the original Swedish settlers had not dug in his heels, this borough on the Jersey side of the Delaware River from Tacony would still be called Texas . But landowner Isaiah Toy considered that name, given to the stretch of Burlington County shoreline by the Camden & Amboy Railroad, "inappropriate" and, the official...
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A report on a proposed $1.6 billion South Jersey light-rail line has been delayed by extended studies of historical resources and threatened and endangered species along the planned route. The proposed 18-mile-long Glassboro-Camden Line would restore passenger service to a corridor now used only by freight trains. A "draft environmental impact statement" on the effects of construction and operation of the rail line was supposed to be published in June, as a required step in the process of getting federal and state approvals for building it. The $8.1 million environmental assessment is to examine effects of noise and vibration, air pollution, social and economic changes, and historic-preservation efforts.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN NJ Transit is spending $300,000 this year to study possible expansion of the Walter Rand Transportation Center in downtown Camden, the new executive director of the transit agency said Tuesday. The new study comes more than four years after NJ Transit approved - but did not build - a new $3 million bus-loading center at the site. Plans for revamping the transit center, which connects South Jersey bus routes, the River Line light-rail line, and the PATCO commuter rail line, have been on hold while business and civic leaders debate what needs to be done in the central Camden location.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
When New Jersey Turnpike officials complete a massive widening project stretching from South Jersey to New Brunswick, there will be plenty of additional elbow room for motorists. In fact, the now heavily used expressway might get downright lonely at times. The same could be true of a new Delaware River bridge near Trenton, as well as additional interchanges on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. While the region's engineers once predicted substantial increases in traffic in coming years - for the Jersey artery, projections called for southbound traffic to nearly double in less than three decades - real-time reports show volumes are flat or even falling.
NEWS
January 4, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Could someone else do a better job of running PATCO? The 14-mile-long railroad that shuttles commuters between Center City and South Jersey has not had a good year. PATCO's continuing inability to keep escalators operating at its stations has triggered a cascade of customer complaints about other issues: Late trains, dirty stations, uncommunicative staff. PATCO trains are frequently overcrowded these days because PATCO is gradually sending its entire 120-car fleet to a factory in Hornell, N.Y., to be refurbished.
NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
PITMAN A proposed $1.6 billion South Jersey light-rail line drew scores of area residents to Pitman on Tuesday evening to review the plans for possible operation by 2019. Another similar "open house" meeting is scheduled for Camden on Thursday as planners explain where the 18-mile route would go and what information they are gathering for their environmental-impact statement. The long-discussed rail line would restore passenger service to a corridor now used only for freight trains and run between Glassboro and Camden, with 14 stops.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY Train service on the Atlantic City Line should be increased to one train an hour, and a station near the Atlantic City airport would boost ridership, a study for NJ Transit says. The cost of operating 20 round-trips daily between Atlantic City and Philadelphia was estimated at $29.4 million a year, with passenger fares expected to cover 38 percent of the cost. Currently, there are 12 trains in each direction daily, with passengers required to wait as long as 21/2 hours between trains at midday.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
The River Line awakens long before dawn. Soon, hundreds of slumbering souls are awake, too. Nearly 10 years have passed since NJ Transit inaugurated a 34-mile commuter line between Camden and Trenton. Yet, the horns blaring from light rail by day and Conrail freight trains by night still set teeth on edge. The first commuter trains pass about 6 a.m. through Riverton, a borough of 2,000 fronting the Delaware River. "We love it here," Brenda Fleig said last week, gesturing outside her door to the Victorian-era homes and gas streetlamps for which her town is known.
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