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Riverfront Park

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NEWS
July 17, 1995 | By Sonya Senkowsky, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It took more than $300,000, at least half of it in grant money, to turn the last undeveloped stretch of riverfront property here into the Riverfront Park, more commonly known as Floodgate Park. But today, nine years after the park was opened to the public, it's not clear what it would take to get residents to use it. "It could be a nice place if it were used more," Frank Marucci, recreational committee chairman, said of the remote stretch of land at the town's outskirts that planners once envisioned as a bustling family park.
NEWS
May 31, 1999 | By Candace Heckman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For years now, the riverfront park at the end of Floodgate Road has been rumored to be a spot to cruise for sex, but authorities say it is time to crack down. Nine men, ages 43 to 69, from Gloucester, Camden and Salem Counties were arrested during a weeklong undercover investigation in the remote park by Detectives Joseph Giordano Jr. and Jeff Godfrey of the Greenwich Township police. The men were arrested in April after performing lewd behavior ranging from urinating in front of officers to performing sexual acts in the open.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After nearly four months of studying ways to perk up this troubled borough, a team of municipal-planning consultants presented its revitalization plan last night, pitching proposals for a stadium for a minor-league baseball team, an ice-skating rink and a riverfront park. But what was left unsaid was where the money would come from. The consultants put no price tag on their ideas last night. Steve Nelson, deputy chief operating officer for the Montgomery County commissioners, said that when the final report is issued early next year it will have estimated costs and likely funding sources.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | By Marego Athans, Special to The Inquirer
In a move that Burlington City officials and merchants expect to breathe new life into the city's historic downtown, the City Council has given initial approval to a project that would create a $3 million shopping mall near the Delaware River promenade. It's been a decade since the city launched the state's first "Main Street" project, under which it used state money to restore authentic storefront facades. The idea was to turn the city's hub - already endowed with a riverfront and a place in pre-Revolutionary War America as the capital of West Jersey - into a bustling retail center.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | By Jeff McGaw, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
"When Anna gets mad, there's just no talking to her. " That's what a defense witness had to say about her friend Anna Rogers - accused of stabbing a man in a Norristown park - during a nonjury trial Wednesday in Montgomery County Court. Robert Petrovich, 29, the man who was stabbed, found that out the hard way. Rogers, according to her own testimony, stabbed Petrovich in the chest with a folding fishing knife after the two exchanged obscene remarks in a parking lot at Riverfront Park in Norristown on April 30, 1991.
NEWS
January 5, 2005
A U.S. District Court hearing scheduled for today promises to shape up into a classic, old-fashioned battle of people vs. big business, public vs. private rights, even good guys vs. bad guys. It's a fight that has also generated unlikely alliances among groups not usually known for collaborating, including the Bicycle Coalition, the Logan Square Neighborhood Association, Philadelphia Park Alliance, state Sen. Vincent Fumo, and City Council President Anna Verna, who are all trying to join the city against Florida-based transport company, CSX, in the battle over access to Schuylkill River Park.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | By Meredith Fischer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If all goes according to plan, Montgomery County will build a linear park at the Schuylkill riverfront, and some residents along that 42-mile stretch whose homes sustained flood damage because of Hurricane Floyd will receive monetary relief. The county commissioners yesterday voted to hire two consulting firms to study the river-park concept and the possibility of compensating residents interested in selling their homes within the river's low-lying floodplains. "We've already been contacted by one homeowner in Mont Clare whose property was under water," Commissioner James W. Maza said.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | By Robert Sanchez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Plan after plan for revitalizing Norristown has been scrapped over the years. The latest ideas for bringing new life to the blighted Montgomery County seat are not likely to die as easily, says the director of the Montgomery County Planning Commission. In fact, Ken Hughes said, the commission will have a chance to prove that today, when its members tour a two-mile stretch of the Schuylkill waterfront with the aim of promoting ambitious development there. Though commission members have traveled other parts of Norristown, this will be the first time the entire group makes the trek along the riverbank, Hughes said.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | By Sharon Tubbs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On any given day, one can see children scrabbling in the sandbox or romping on the swings, adults challenging each other on the tennis courts, or an elderly person feeding a group of eager squirrels at H. Kenneth Wilkie Memorial River's Edge Park in Florence. But directly across the Delaware from the riverfront park, the Tullytown Landfill operates in Bucks County, Pa. Heaping piles of waste at the landfill are visible from the park's shoreline, and the stench of trash permeates the air. To Bob Wilkie, the proximity of the landfill to the 14-acre park dedicated to the memory of his brother, a former mayor of Florence, is "a shame.
NEWS
October 21, 1992 | By Lara Wozniak, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Planes descended in whining succession toward Philadelphia International Airport and throbbing dredges scraped the nearby riverbed, almost overwhelming the voices of Joan Eller and Louisa Llewellyn as they talked about times when ships quietly sailed up the Delaware River. About 75 fourth graders sat around them on the banks of the Delaware, straining to hear stories about their community's distant past - and itching to help unearth history. They wanted to know all about the archaeological dig about to begin at the former Coast Guard base in Gloucester City.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
A great public space like the Schuylkill River Park deserves an exceptional building as a neighbor. So far, developer Carl Dranoff's proposal for One Riverside isn't it. That doesn't mean the 21-story apartment tower designed by Cecil Baker + Partners can't evolve into something worthy of the popular riverfront park that surrounds the site. But it's going to take work - and not just by the development team. The neighborhood has to pitch in, too. The wailing and keening that greeted last week's presentation to the Center City Residents Association wasn't the kind of constructive help that this project needs.
NEWS
January 5, 2005
A U.S. District Court hearing scheduled for today promises to shape up into a classic, old-fashioned battle of people vs. big business, public vs. private rights, even good guys vs. bad guys. It's a fight that has also generated unlikely alliances among groups not usually known for collaborating, including the Bicycle Coalition, the Logan Square Neighborhood Association, Philadelphia Park Alliance, state Sen. Vincent Fumo, and City Council President Anna Verna, who are all trying to join the city against Florida-based transport company, CSX, in the battle over access to Schuylkill River Park.
NEWS
December 30, 2004 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pottstown leaders will usher out the old year and celebrate the new by lighting a bonfire Saturday at Riverfront Park. The New Year's Day bonfire will be lit in a stone-and-dirt pit in the park, which lies along the Schuylkill just west of Hanover Street. It takes place at noon no matter what the conditions, said borough Councilman Ronald C. Downie. Clear, 58-degree weather is expected, he said. Downie said the bonfire is a way of drawing people out to enjoy nature, mingle, and walk the piece of the Schuylkill River Trail that crosses the park.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | By Robert Sanchez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Plan after plan for revitalizing Norristown has been scrapped over the years. The latest ideas for bringing new life to the blighted Montgomery County seat are not likely to die as easily, says the director of the Montgomery County Planning Commission. In fact, Ken Hughes said, the commission will have a chance to prove that today, when its members tour a two-mile stretch of the Schuylkill waterfront with the aim of promoting ambitious development there. Though commission members have traveled other parts of Norristown, this will be the first time the entire group makes the trek along the riverbank, Hughes said.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After nearly four months of studying ways to perk up this troubled borough, a team of municipal-planning consultants presented its revitalization plan last night, pitching proposals for a stadium for a minor-league baseball team, an ice-skating rink and a riverfront park. But what was left unsaid was where the money would come from. The consultants put no price tag on their ideas last night. Steve Nelson, deputy chief operating officer for the Montgomery County commissioners, said that when the final report is issued early next year it will have estimated costs and likely funding sources.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | By Meredith Fischer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If all goes according to plan, Montgomery County will build a linear park at the Schuylkill riverfront, and some residents along that 42-mile stretch whose homes sustained flood damage because of Hurricane Floyd will receive monetary relief. The county commissioners yesterday voted to hire two consulting firms to study the river-park concept and the possibility of compensating residents interested in selling their homes within the river's low-lying floodplains. "We've already been contacted by one homeowner in Mont Clare whose property was under water," Commissioner James W. Maza said.
NEWS
May 31, 1999 | By Candace Heckman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For years now, the riverfront park at the end of Floodgate Road has been rumored to be a spot to cruise for sex, but authorities say it is time to crack down. Nine men, ages 43 to 69, from Gloucester, Camden and Salem Counties were arrested during a weeklong undercover investigation in the remote park by Detectives Joseph Giordano Jr. and Jeff Godfrey of the Greenwich Township police. The men were arrested in April after performing lewd behavior ranging from urinating in front of officers to performing sexual acts in the open.
NEWS
March 9, 1999 | by Jaclyn D'Auria, For the Daily News
Ten years ago, it was just a passing thought, the idea of developing land along the Delaware River. But that thought may soon be a reality for West Deptford Township residents. Mayor David Shields said the township purchased 1,500 acres of land in the knick of time: "We were concerned that this site would be gobbled up by the Army Corps of Engineers and the land would be used as a dumping site for dredging material. "If that happened, we wouldn't be able to use the site and we would have gotten no tax revenue for it. " The township plans to develop the property into a riverfront park that would include a community center with a senior citizen facility, an indoor aquatic center, twin ice-skating rinks, and a public golf course.
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mayor Joseph DiGirolamo doesn't see just smokestacks along the Delaware River in his township. He doesn't focus on the barbed chain-link fences and "No Trespassing" signs strung up along River Road. He doesn't even let the faint scent of chemicals in the air deter him. He has a vision - a vision of people hiking and biking along a riverside trail that passes through his township and stretches on up to Morrisville Borough, across the Delaware River by bridge to Trenton, and back down to Palmyra.
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mayor Joseph DiGirolamo doesn't see just smokestacks along the Delaware River in his township. He doesn't focus on the barbed chain-link fences and "No Trespassing" signs strung up along River Road. He doesn't even let the faint scent of chemicals in the air deter him. He has a vision - a vision of people hiking and biking along a riverside trail that passes through his township and stretches on up to Morrisville Borough, across the Delaware River by bridge to Trenton, and back down to Palmyra.
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