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NEWS
March 19, 2003 | MICHELLE MALKIN
WAR IS HERE. Now it is time for the half-clad, anti-America moaners and the snarling 9/11 memorial trashers and the Dixie Shrews to bow down their heads with the rest of us and pray for the safety of our troops. The blessings of liberty are not secured by pacifiers. A common defense is not provided by "Kumbaya" warblers. It is those in uniform, in arms, in battle whose collective sacrifices have faithfully secured and defended the peace for ourselves and our posterity.
NEWS
November 13, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
An explosion today destroyed the headquarters of U.S. military experts in Riyadh, killing at least two people, injuring nine others and setting the building afire, Saudi sources said. An ambulance worker said at least two Americans had been killed. The cause of the explosion was not immediately clear, but the subsequent fire engulfed most of the three-story building in flames, witnesses told The Associated Press. Huge plumes of smoke were visible across Riyadh. Witnesses and Saudi sources said that the explosion could be heard in many parts of the capital and that windows had been blown out in a number of buildings.
NEWS
June 18, 2004 | By Dave Montgomery INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Saudi authorities were quoted yesterday as saying they would not release prisoners in exchange for the release of kidnapped U.S. defense worker Paul M. Johnson Jr., as was demanded Tuesday by his captors. Johnson, 49, formerly of Eagleswood Township in Ocean County, N.J., was kidnapped Saturday in Riyadh by a group calling itself al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. The group posted a video on the Internet on Tuesday showing Johnson and threatening to kill him unless the government released hundreds of suspected militants in 72 hours.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2012 | By Glen Carey, Bloomberg News
Abdullah al-Luhaymi spends weekend nights cruising around the Saudi capital Riyadh on his motorbike before stopping to meet friends, usually at an American-style fast-food joint. Each month he has more to choose from. "This is where we like to eat and watch people, this is the best area in Riyadh," the 29-year-old university graduate says, sitting on his Kawasaki. He's parked outside Dunkin' Donuts and just down the road from Applebee's, Elevation Burger and Krispy Kreme. People wait in lines to be served.
NEWS
December 3, 2003 | By Dave Montgomery INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Members of a suspected al-Qaeda cell that plotted a foiled car bombing last week were planning to kill senior members of the Saudi royal family and also had staked out a Western-style residential compound, according to U.S. and Saudi intelligence officials. The disclosures came amid new fears of violence in Saudi Arabia, already rocked by bombing attacks that have killed more than 50. U.S. Embassy officials warned yesterday that the Seder Village residential compound in eastern Riyadh remained a target.
NEWS
May 14, 2003
Ever since 9/11, Americans have nervously anticipated major terrorist attacks. One happened Monday night - no less tragic and depressing for being outside the United States. The early theory is that nine or so well-organized terrorists drove bomb-laden vehicles into three residential compounds in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, firing weapons before detonating their deadly cargoes and themselves. Twenty innocent people, at least seven of them Americans and two of them Jordanian children, were killed.
NEWS
June 27, 1996
The truck bomb that killed 19 U.S. service members and injured hundreds more in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, on Tuesday is a warning that defending U.S. interests in the Mideast will always be fraught with danger. This is the most devastating Mideast terrorist attack on Americans since the bombing of the U.S. Marine barracks in Beirut 12 years ago. Back then, U.S. Marines were engaged in an ill-defined mission that foolishly linked them with one side of a long-running civil war in Lebanon.
NEWS
July 21, 2004 | Daily News wire services
Sandy Berger steps down from Kerry campaign job Former National Security Adviser Sandy Berger quit yesterday as an adviser to Democrat John Kerry's campaign. Berger's decision came as both parties tried to take advantage of the disclosure of an investigation into whether he mishandled terrorism documents. Republicans said the probe raises questions about whether the former Clinton administration official was trying to hide embarrassing materials from the public. Democrats questioned why disclosure of a months-old investigation came just before today's release of the final report by the commission investigating the Sept.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | By Abdullah al-Shihri and Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - Saudi Arabia closed its Cairo embassy Saturday and recalled its ambassador following protests over a detained Egyptian human-rights lawyer in a sharp escalation of tension between two regional powerhouses already on shaky terms due to uprisings in the Arab world. The unexpected Saudi diplomatic break came after days of protests by hundreds of Egyptians outside the Saudi Embassy in Cairo and consulates in other cities to demand the release of Ahmed el-Gezawi. Relatives and human-rights groups say he was detained for allegedly insulting the kingdom's monarch.
NEWS
January 2, 2012
Iraqi leader calls for united nation BAGHDAD - Iraq's prime minister called Sunday for unity and greater political stability to ensure the country's security after the end of the U.S. military presence. Speaking at a televised celebration in Baghdad, Nouri al-Maliki warned Iraqis against "excessive joy" over the departure of U.S. troops, saying the country's security situation remains perilous. The last U.S. combat soldiers left Dec. 18. Maliki called on all Iraqis to unite in the interest of the nation and stressed that Iraq needs stability if it hopes to remain secure and rebuild.
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BUSINESS
October 10, 2012 | By Glen Carey, Bloomberg News
Abdullah al-Luhaymi spends weekend nights cruising around the Saudi capital Riyadh on his motorbike before stopping to meet friends, usually at an American-style fast-food joint. Each month he has more to choose from. "This is where we like to eat and watch people, this is the best area in Riyadh," the 29-year-old university graduate says, sitting on his Kawasaki. He's parked outside Dunkin' Donuts and just down the road from Applebee's, Elevation Burger and Krispy Kreme. People wait in lines to be served.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | By Abdullah al-Shihri and Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - Saudi Arabia closed its Cairo embassy Saturday and recalled its ambassador following protests over a detained Egyptian human-rights lawyer in a sharp escalation of tension between two regional powerhouses already on shaky terms due to uprisings in the Arab world. The unexpected Saudi diplomatic break came after days of protests by hundreds of Egyptians outside the Saudi Embassy in Cairo and consulates in other cities to demand the release of Ahmed el-Gezawi. Relatives and human-rights groups say he was detained for allegedly insulting the kingdom's monarch.
NEWS
January 2, 2012
Iraqi leader calls for united nation BAGHDAD - Iraq's prime minister called Sunday for unity and greater political stability to ensure the country's security after the end of the U.S. military presence. Speaking at a televised celebration in Baghdad, Nouri al-Maliki warned Iraqis against "excessive joy" over the departure of U.S. troops, saying the country's security situation remains perilous. The last U.S. combat soldiers left Dec. 18. Maliki called on all Iraqis to unite in the interest of the nation and stressed that Iraq needs stability if it hopes to remain secure and rebuild.
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | By Donna Abu-Nasr, Bloomberg News
DUBAI - Activists among Saudi Arabia's women, who can't drive or vote and need male approval to work and travel, are turning to the type of online organizing that helped topple Egypt's Hosni Mubarak to force change in a system that they say treats them like children. The "Baladi" or "My Country" campaign is focused on this year's municipal elections, only the second nationwide ballot that the absolute monarchy has allowed. The election board said Monday that women would be excluded from the Sept.
NEWS
November 18, 2009 | By Marisa L. Porges
As the Obama administration continues struggling with how to close Guantanamo, it finds itself with few options. The recent announcement of plans to prosecute Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four other detainees in federal court is a positive step, but it also reminds us that little headway has been made on most of the Guantanamo detainees. About 75 are deemed too dangerous to release, and 90 are suitable for transfer but have no place to go. Without any good choices, rehabilitation has emerged as a possible alternative.
NEWS
July 21, 2004 | Daily News wire services
Sandy Berger steps down from Kerry campaign job Former National Security Adviser Sandy Berger quit yesterday as an adviser to Democrat John Kerry's campaign. Berger's decision came as both parties tried to take advantage of the disclosure of an investigation into whether he mishandled terrorism documents. Republicans said the probe raises questions about whether the former Clinton administration official was trying to hide embarrassing materials from the public. Democrats questioned why disclosure of a months-old investigation came just before today's release of the final report by the commission investigating the Sept.
NEWS
June 19, 2004 | By Edward Colimore and Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
As a boy, Paul Johnson Jr. showed a keen interest in electronics that would lead him far from the world he knew in the West Creek section of Eagleswood, N.J. Nicknamed "Eagle," Johnson tinkered with toy cars and transistor radios for amusement as he grew up, but set serious goals and would not be deterred, friends and relatives said. His passion for electronics put him on a career path to the Air Force, to Lockheed Martin in Florida, then to contracting work in Saudi Arabia - and a new culture that he heartily embraced.
NEWS
June 19, 2004 | By Dave Montgomery and Warren Strobel INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Extremists beheaded kidnapped New Jersey defense worker Paul Johnson Jr. yesterday after Saudi authorities failed to agree to their demand to release hundreds of imprisoned militants. Within hours, security forces had tracked down and killed the captors' leader, Abdulaziz al-Moqrin. Johnson's body was found in Riyadh shortly after photos of his severed head appeared on an Islamic Web site. "We slaughtered the American hostage Paul Johnson after the deadline we gave to the Saudi tyrants," a posted statement said.
NEWS
June 18, 2004 | By Dave Montgomery INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Saudi authorities were quoted yesterday as saying they would not release prisoners in exchange for the release of kidnapped U.S. defense worker Paul M. Johnson Jr., as was demanded Tuesday by his captors. Johnson, 49, formerly of Eagleswood Township in Ocean County, N.J., was kidnapped Saturday in Riyadh by a group calling itself al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. The group posted a video on the Internet on Tuesday showing Johnson and threatening to kill him unless the government released hundreds of suspected militants in 72 hours.
NEWS
June 14, 2004 | By Dave Montgomery INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
U.S. and Saudi officials searched yesterday for a missing U.S. defense worker who may have been kidnapped or killed by Islamic militants in Riyadh, apparently part of a stepped-up campaign to drive foreigners out of the country and undermine the oil economy. On Saturday, another American was shot to death in his garage in Riyadh, the Saudi capital. At least 29 Westerners have been killed in Saudi Arabia since May 1. The missing American was identified as Paul M. Johnson Jr., 49, an engineer with the Lockheed Martin Corp.
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