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NEWS
October 9, 1988 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
Wallace Township supervisors have demanded that a developer put a $162,000 bank account in the name of the township to be disbursed for road construction. Rosalyn Abrahams of West Chester presented a plan at Tuesday's board meeting that would allow her bank to pay contractors after road work was approved by the supervisors, but the supervisors rejected that arrangement. "It is our road," Chairman Earl Cooke told Abrahams. "If we approve it and pay for it, it is going to be ours forever.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | By Michael Hernan, Special to The Inquirer
Revised preliminary plans for Three Ponds, a 28-unit housing development, are once again before the Charlestown Township Planning Commission despite litigation and the opposition of some area residents. Rouse/Chamberlin Inc., developer of the project, first presented sketches to the planning commission in 1981 but was denied approval for subdivision, setting off a court battle that is now on appeal to Commonwealth Court. On Tuesday night, the developer presented new sketch plans for the development on 115 acres of what is now cornfields south of Pikeland Road near Church Road.
NEWS
March 13, 1992 | by Evan Levine, Special to the Daily News
ROAD CONSTRUCTION AHEAD Focus Productions / $19.95 If your kids are fascinated by heavy equipment, then this video is for them. The whole video focuses on - yes, you guessed it - road construction, and if you're a 5-year-old, you'll probably find it wildly exciting. Even if you're not, it has some pretty nifty stuff, and its homemade quality is strangely endearing. "Road Construction Ahead" is narrated by a friendly construction worker named George. You get a pretty good feel for what's ahead right at the beginning, when the viewer is told, "Sit your little road builders down and let them see how the big boys get the job done!"
NEWS
June 3, 1999 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For five years, Karen Woodson served up homemade desserts, hot lunches and hearty breakfasts to those who would stop by the Park Avenue Cafe. Named for the local Bensalem road that juts off Hulmeville Road toward Route 13, the restaurant seemed to be in the perfect spot to lure both hungry families and those on their lunch breaks. "The restaurant was like a Cheers. . . . Everybody knew me," Woodson said. And business - especially breakfast and lunch - was brisk from 1994, when she started her cafe, until about a year ago, Woodson said.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | By Douglas Belkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The pivotal seat that carried an earned-income tax into this municipality in October will be up for grabs in Tuesday's Republican primary, when newcomer Gerald Andris seeks to oust Richard Lewis from the Board of Commissioners. Andris, 36, an engineer at Ford Electronics, said that if he was elected to the Ward 5 seat, his top priority would be working for repeal of the tax. "It's an escalating process," Andris said. "The politicians in office want more money, and they're not being held accountable for the money they have.
NEWS
October 12, 1986 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Residents of Willowdale Road in East Marlborough Township voiced disapproval to the planning commission of proposed road construction from Doe Run Road to their street. The residents, represented by Media attorney James Gannon, said they feared that the increased traffic would be a safety hazard and that Willowdale Road would be used as an access road to the larger, heavily traveled Route 926. The new road construction would be done in conjunction with the proposed development of 25 single-family houses on Doe Run Road.
NEWS
January 2, 1987 | By Kenneth Glick, Special to The Inquirer
The Haddon Township Commissioners closed out their 1986 municipal agenda Wednesday morning by passing a pair of measures aimed at reducing expenditures for municipal road construction and insurance. By a 3-0 vote, the commission ratified a cooperative pricing agreement that would allow the township to jointly seek bids on local road projects with two neighboring boroughs, Haddonfield and Haddon Heights. Officials said that by combining their projected road construction and material costs into a single bid package, the three Camden County communities could decrease their contracting expenditures by as much as 20 percent.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
The Westtown Township Board of Supervisors has given final approval to Westtown Village, a shopping center at the northeast corner of Routes 202 and 926. The supervisors voted, 3-0, Monday in favor of the 79,000-square-foot shopping center proposed by Exton developer Hough-Loew Associates. The shopping center will contain an Acme supermarket, a First Federal Savings & Loan branch, a real-estate office, a video-rental store, a hair salon, an Italian restaurant and a drug store, said developer Jack Loew.
NEWS
April 6, 1999 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Turning Exton Square Mall into Chester County's first regional shopping complex has so far produced only mounds of dirt and fenced-off parking areas. Cranes loom over the horizon. An 18th-century house was lifted and carted to a new location on the mall grounds to make way for a new department store. Now the Rouse Co., which owns the mall, is preparing to begin major road improvements at the intersection of Routes 30 and 100 at a cost of $3 million. The work is expected to start at the end of the month and end by October.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Special to The Inquirer
Robert T. Winzinger Inc., the Hainesport contracting firm, agreed yesterday to close a controversial dump in a residential section of Hainesport, township prosecutor Mark Molz said yesterday. Winzinger's attorney, Walter Wolf, negotiated an agreement in Hainesport Municipal Court to remove broken concrete, scrap metal and used construction materials during the next eight months. The accord, covering the 60-acre site off the Mount Holly Bypass, ended minutes before Winzinger, president of the $30-million-a-year road construction, demolition and recycling company, was due to appear before Hainesport Judge Harry Dyer 3d on charges of illegal dumping and operating machinery without a permit.
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BUSINESS
July 22, 2013
There is a famous saying that "no good deed goes unpunished. " That seems to be the case with fuel efficiency and transportation funding, and the consequence is that our infrastructure and economic competitiveness are being put at risk. Getting more miles to the gallon is great. We save money while the economy and the environment benefit as well. Unfortunately, filling up less means gasoline-tax revenue declines. Fewer dollars are available for road construction and maintenance, and that is a real economic threat.
NEWS
June 5, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delayed by a harsh winter, highway construction crews have returned with a vengeance to Philadelphia-area roadways, causing congestion even as they work to ease it. For drivers, the busy construction season means delays, detours, and gridlock. Some are pioneering new commutes to avoid roadwork, and delivery drivers are regularly recalculating their routes to dodge clogged arteries. Big projects include the widening of New Jersey's toll roads and the construction of a nine-mile-long parkway in Bucks and Montgomery Counties.
NEWS
August 16, 2009 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
For area drivers, this is becoming the summer of their discontent. An unusually hectic season of road construction, intensified by hurry-up federal stimulus projects, is creating widespread congestion and delays for motorists. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation will spend nearly twice as much as usual on Southeastern Pennsylvania highways this year and now has 150 road projects in Philadelphia, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, and Montgomery Counties. On I-95 alone, 10 separate projects are under way. The New Jersey Department of Transportation will spend 22 percent more than last year, with 10 projects under way in Burlington, Camden and Gloucester Counties.
NEWS
June 17, 2003 | By Thomas Belton
In Jersey City, there is a road called the "depressed highway" - actually a long, dark defile through the granite cliffs that deposits you at the mouth of the Holland Tunnel. As a kid, when I first heard the roadway mentioned, I envisioned a sulking, withdrawn ribbon of highway with droopy Deputy Dawg eyes and a frown, akin to the look my big sister sported after being dumped by one of her boyfriends. Recently the Interstate 295 construction project in South Jersey brought this sullen road from my past to mind, especially the cattle chute that leads you at a snail's pace through Cherry Hill.
NEWS
October 26, 2000 | By Will Van Sant, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The legal and political battle over the Pinehurst Extension road project is on. Again. No sooner had Democratic politicians taken off their construction hats and dropped their shovels after a ceremonial groundbreaking yesterday than Republican Assemblyman George Geist vowed to pursue legal avenues to derail the project. At issue is the linking of Route 73 and the White Horse Pike by extending Pinehurst Drive. Connecting the roads would turn 136 surrounding acres into prime development territory.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One down and 43 to go. That was the tally yesterday as a wrecking crew went to work on the first lot slated for demolition as part of the project to beautify the Admiral Wilson Boulevard. The first building to fall was a 1950s-era gas station on an acre on the south side of the highway between the old Admiral Wilson Motel and the boulevard's sole pedestrian overpass. The cinder-block-and-wood structure - it was a used-car dealership in its last incarnation - crumpled half an hour after repeated blows from a mechanical excavator's steel shovel.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
What a relief! After two years of construction-related detours that often sent trucks rumbling through residential streets here, the eastern portion of Route 291, the Industrial Highway, that runs through Chester will reopen today. The 1.2-mile section of the highway from Chester's border with Eddystone Borough to Franklin Street has been realigned for easier truck travel and now has five traffic lanes instead of two. The project cost $14.9 million. Route 291 runs the length of Chester, just a few blocks from the Delaware River.
NEWS
September 15, 1999 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It's budget season, and the two factions on the Township Council are at odds over how much funding to earmark for the much-ballyhooed Hickstown Road Park project. Construction on the first phase of the 60-acre park is underway after the council awarded a $1.9 million contract last month. The township managed to save enough money in the last several years so that funding for the first phase did not have to come out of 1999-2000 budget, which is being developed. The three Republican-backed members of the council, who made the park a priority when they were elected 3 1/2 years ago, want $60,000 included in next year's $25.8 million budget so $1.2 million can be bonded to fund the second part of the five-phase project.
NEWS
August 19, 1999 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the soil surrounding the crumbling facade of the King of Prussia Inn, archaeologists found jagged proof of a storied colonial history. There were ceramic pieces from mugs perhaps hoisted for a rowdy toast, and bits of oyster shells from a favorite dish once consumed by a hungry traveler. "They didn't have garbage collection back then," said Catherine Spohn, a staff archaeologist for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. "They just threw everything out the back door.
NEWS
June 3, 1999 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For five years, Karen Woodson served up homemade desserts, hot lunches and hearty breakfasts to those who would stop by the Park Avenue Cafe. Named for the local Bensalem road that juts off Hulmeville Road toward Route 13, the restaurant seemed to be in the perfect spot to lure both hungry families and those on their lunch breaks. "The restaurant was like a Cheers. . . . Everybody knew me," Woodson said. And business - especially breakfast and lunch - was brisk from 1994, when she started her cafe, until about a year ago, Woodson said.
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