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NEWS
March 7, 2013
DO YOU NEED cheap Internet access, an affordable laptop or computer classes? How about all of the above? Here's a road map for bridging the digital divide. Say you need to get online ASAP. For free. *  There are 79 free computer labs (a/k/a "Keyspots") in Philadelphia, where you can take computer classes or just go online. Get more information at 3-1-1, 215-851-1990, phillykeyspots.org or @Phillykeyspots on Twitter. *  The Free Library of Philadelphia offers Internet access at many branches.
NEWS
September 11, 2003 | By Rabbi Michael Lerner
Mahmoud Abbas stepped down as Palestinian prime minister on Saturday. Wednesday, Ahmed Qurei confirmed that he had agreed to serve as the new prime minister. The Abbas government failed because he relied on a severely flawed U.S. "road map" and on Israel's good faith, and on his own people's willingness to give him some breathing room. He was wrong on all counts. But the United States can still rescue the road map. Abbas took office with a powerful challenge to Palestinians who had relied on violence to defeat Israel's occupation of the West Bank and Gaza.
NEWS
August 27, 2004
Building more housing units in West Bank settlements may be a smart, even necessary, domestic political move for Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, who recently put out a call for construction bids. His plan to unilaterally disengage Israeli forces from the Gaza Strip continues to face opposition from hard-line members of his own Likud party and from others in his governing coalition. But President Bush only further undercut his own rutted peace plan, known as the "road map," by recently reversing his earlier, public stance and quietly approving of Sharon's plan, which would result in more settlers in the West Bank.
NEWS
March 30, 2003 | By Froma Harrop
The road to Baghdad is turning out to be a road to the "road map," as well. Tony Blair insists that both roads be driven at the same time. The "road map" is a plan to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, forged by the United States, the European Union, Russia and the United Nations. Its goal is to establish a fully independent Palestinian state alongside Israel by 2005. Pin another medal for leadership on the breast of the British prime minister. Blair says he's determined to resolve this horrid conflict.
NEWS
May 12, 2003 | By Warren P. Strobel and Aaron Davis INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell has been urging Israelis and Palestinians to begin implementing a new Mideast peace plan, and yesterday he said he had found enough consensus to move forward. In the West Bank city of Jericho, Powell asked new Palestinian Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas to quickly begin dismantling violent Palestinian factions in order to strengthen his two-week-old government and lay the groundwork for negotiations. Abbas responded positively to Powell's plea to "move decisively and quickly to dismantle the terrorist infrastructure.
NEWS
July 31, 2003 | By Tom Neumann
When Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon visited with President Bush this week, he asked a question on the minds of many Israelis: What if the road map for peace fails? While Sharon reaffirmed his government's commitment to seeking ways to make the U.S.-backed plan work, the increasing evidence that the Palestinians are unable or unwilling to keep their end of the bargain raises the question of what to do if the peace efforts collapse. To date, it seems, none of the four architects of the road map - the United Nations, the European Union, Russia, and the United States - has given much thought to the prospect of failure.
NEWS
May 27, 2003 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Does rising excitement over the "road map" for Middle East peace mean a breakthrough is imminent? Possibly. But even more than the adversaries themselves, much depends on how far the Bush administration is willing to go, how much it intends to risk. Analysts and commentators in the Arab world and inside Israel say America must present a sharp picture of its own vision for a two-state solution and make Israelis and Palestinians pay a heavy price for failing to abide. "Is it a different ball game?
NEWS
April 27, 2003 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Performance based. . . . Goal driven. . . . A permanent two-state solution. " The slow-aborning "road map" for Middle East peace does not stint on lofty language. Conceived as a framework for resolving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the multiphase plan is to be announced publicly after the ratification of Prime Minister-designate Mahmoud Abbas and his new cabinet. He presented the cabinet last week following hard bargaining with Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat, who reluctantly agreed to share some power.
NEWS
June 19, 2003 | By Trudy Rubin
Can terrorist attacks on Israel be stopped and the new, Bush-backed Mideast peace process take off? A large part of the answer lies on this windy, rocky hilltop in the southernmost part of the West Bank. Here sits Asael, a collection of eight house trailers, seven adults, three dogs, a water tower and a handful of soldiers to guard them, that make up a settlement outpost. Asael is one of 62 nascent Jewish colonies that have been set up unofficially by zealous young Israelis since Ariel Sharon came to office.
NEWS
April 14, 2003 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shimon Peres, the longtime Israeli leader who negotiated the Oslo accords with the Palestinians nearly a decade ago, predicted at the University of Pennsylvania last night that the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq would transform the Middle East - Arab nations and Israel alike. Israelis, Peres said, will get a chance to revive failed peace talks as the Bush administration shows new interest in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The Arab world, he said, will see "free, open and honest democracy" take shape in Iraq, and will like it. "In Iraq, for the first time, they are discovering that it is not modernity but tradition that threatens their lives.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 26, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowan University in Glassboro counts its engineering program as one of its premiere academic programs and has aggressive goals to expand enrollment. A few miles away, in nearby Deptford, Rowan College at Gloucester County is working to grow its own engineering science program, potentially doubling the number of freshmen in the pre-baccalaureate program in just two years. With both Rowan schools in Gloucester County looking to expand - and cut into a piece of the state's notorious annual "brain drain" of college students - school officials signed an agreement last week to align their engineering programs and create a road map for transfer.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER and SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writers benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
THE CITY has agreed to pay $1.4 million and reform its gun-permit procedures after the Department of Licenses & Inspections posted the names and addresses of thousands of gun owners in 2012. The information - released as part of Mayor Nutter's open-data initiative - was included on an interactive map on the city's website that featured clickable revolver icons at addresses where people had been denied a license-to-carry permit, or had their permit revoked, and had then appealed to L&I's Review Board.
SPORTS
April 18, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
'THE SUMMERTIME is where you make money," 76ers coach Brett Brown said yesterday. He was alluding to the work he believes his many borderline-NBA players must put in if they want to continue a career either here or elsewhere. He could have been talking about general manager Sam Hinkie, though. Yesterday the players, coach and GM gathered for one last time before going their separate ways for the offseason, with the players and coaches also talking to the media. Despite a season that produced only 19 wins, the third fewest in team history, the genuine mood the first day after the end of the season was mostly of hope and excitement for next season.
NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The New Jersey legislative committee investigating September lane closures at the George Washington Bridge plans to move forward with its inquiry, despite a judge's order declining to force two key players in the political scandal to comply with subpoenas, the panel's cochair said Thursday. Assemblyman John S. Wisniewski (D., Middlesex) said the judge's opinion "lays out a road map" for the committee to proceed with regard to Bridget Anne Kelly and Bill Stepien, both former top aides to Gov. Christie.
SPORTS
September 27, 2013 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
DURING HIS SESSION with the media yesterday, new Sixers coach Brett Brown had some interesting things to say about some of the players he has inherited. Here's some of what he said: On Thaddeus Young, Evan Turner and Spencer Hawes: "The team has been in the gym since Sept. 9, led by Spencer, Thaddeus and Evan. I'm proud of what they've done so far. They are enjoyable to talk to and I have empowered them. I look at them the way we used to look at Timmy [Duncan], Tony [Parker] and Manu [Ginobili]
BUSINESS
July 22, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Gasoline prices have been shooting up, and the usual motorist frustration is kicking in. Check these sites to find the cheapest gas around and to understand why prices fluctuate so wildly. The AAA auto club publishes a detailed daily roundup of average gasoline and other motor-fuel prices nationally and state-by-state. The data come from the Oil Price Information Service, or OPIS, which supplies industry information to oil companies, distributors, and government and commercial petroleum-product buyers.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
While preparing to remove a malignant tumor from the Rev. Michael Prewitt's brain, neurosurgeon Steven Brem of the University of Pennsylvania worried that the surgery could affect his patient's ability to speak or move. As surgeons have for decades, he studied an MRI that showed the tumor in Prewitt's left parietal lobe. But he also examined a type of scan you've probably never heard of: diffusion tensor imaging. It shows bundles of the fibers that transmit messages from parts of the brain to one another and the brain stem.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
The Economy League of Greater Philadelphia is trying to keep everyone's eyes on the future of the region. For the last four years, the nonprofit civic organization has engaged in what amounts to a never-ending quiz: "What does Philadelphia want to be when it grows up?" The Economy League says it is striving to build a "world-class Philadelphia," and its leaders are quick to add that the point is not to produce a glossy report with recommendations that just gets relegated to the bottom drawer of a desk.
NEWS
March 7, 2013
DO YOU NEED cheap Internet access, an affordable laptop or computer classes? How about all of the above? Here's a road map for bridging the digital divide. Say you need to get online ASAP. For free. *  There are 79 free computer labs (a/k/a "Keyspots") in Philadelphia, where you can take computer classes or just go online. Get more information at 3-1-1, 215-851-1990, phillykeyspots.org or @Phillykeyspots on Twitter. *  The Free Library of Philadelphia offers Internet access at many branches.
NEWS
December 12, 2012
WHAT DO YOU want out of life? Are you happy with the work you do to earn the money you need? If you aren't happy, what are you doing to make a change? I had those questions in mind when selecting the final Color of Money Book Club pick of the year, Amazing Things Will Happen: A Real-World Guide on Achieving Success & Happiness by C.C. Chapman (Wiley, hardcover and e-book, $22.95). Chapman is a marketing and business consultant and professional speaker. At 175 pages, this small hardback is a quick read.
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