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Road Salt

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NEWS
October 25, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
The Newtown Township supervisors have voted unanimously to award a contract for road salt to Morton Salt of Chicago. Morton Salt submitted the lowest of five bids - $35.04 a ton - during a brief meeting Monday night. Supervisor E. Coe Williams was absent. The contract for 2,500 tons was for Newtown, Marple and Haverford Townships, Newtown manager Larry Comunale said. He added that depending on the weather, Newtown might use about 300 tons. In other business, Comunale said the township would lose about $10,000 from its 1991 budget because Delaware County on Jan. 1 will end subsidies for recyclables such as newspapers, for which it had paid $25 a ton. The county first made the subsidies available in 1985 to encourage recycling.
NEWS
March 19, 2008 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Salt is the sworn enemy of steel-reinforced concrete, and it doesn't take much to cause a crack like the one that fouled up the I-95 bridge. Over the years, concrete can become permeated with road salt from a steady drip of wintry slush. If salt reaches the inner steel, it's the beginning of the end: corrosion. "Once you start getting salt brine down in there, it's a killer," said Harold Windisch, a senior construction engineer with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.
NEWS
March 3, 2011 | By Kathleen Brady Shea, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new weapon against snow and ice was used on selected Chester County roads and sidewalks this winter - beet juice. It was added to the salt-based brine put on roads before storms and enabled the solution to work at lower temperatures. But those trying to recall whether there were swaths of red-stained concrete, don't bother. "There's no redness at all," said Jack Stewart, a project manager for the county's Facilities Department. "When you put it down, it's more brownish and looks like the road is wet. " The substance is a by-product of sugar beets, which are used to make sweetener and animal feed, officials said.
NEWS
February 9, 2002 | By Nora Koch INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Call it the case of the disappearing salt - 12 tons of it. Police say some salty dog slunk away with a heaping dump truck's worth of road salt and no one knows how or why. About half of the 25-ton load of road salt delivered earlier this week to the Kmart parking lot on Route 38 at Lenola Road is missing, according to police. With the going price for road salt $35 a ton, the take was worth about $420. But it must have had some use for whoever took on the feat of moving 24,000 pounds of loose asphalt spice.
REAL_ESTATE
May 16, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
My recent column announcing that I am painting the exterior of my house for the last time brought expressions of concern from those who don't like the words last time . And, thankfully, a couple of painting questions, which is the reason I write these columns. John Czuba's question concerning painting aluminum siding is one I have gotten before over the years, but it's one that always merits a response. Yes, you can paint aluminum siding, and the website of the Paint Quality Institute in Spring House is my go-to on all broad-brush matters.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | Compiled from Daily News Wire Service reports
DETROIT HONDA RECALL FOR FUEL LEAK American Honda said yesterday it is recalling about 900,000 Accords from model years 1982 through 1985 because of possible fuel leaks. Company officials said about 400,000 cars driven in areas where road salt is used extensively could have the problem. If the protective coating on the fuel filter or breather pipe is damaged, salt could cause the pipes to rust through and gasoline could leak when the tank is filled. No incidents have been reported because of the problem, Honda said.
NEWS
October 21, 2011
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced that dredging will begin Saturday in the 17-acre Fairless Turning Basin, adjacent to the Delaware River in Bucks County, to deepen the 37-foot basin to 40 feet, which is the same shipping depth as the river's main navigation channel. The $990,000 project will take about two weeks. The cost will be shared, 75 percent by the Corps and 25 percent by the Redevelopment Authority of Bucks County. The Bucks County port handles about four million tons of freight a year.
NEWS
January 12, 1994 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writers Frank Dougherty, and Gar Joseph, and the Associated Press contributed to this report
A repeat of last week's monster ice storm was averted during the morning rush hour today as rain replaced the combination of rain, sleet and snow that fell in the area during the night. Streets and highways were wet, but not slippery as the temperatures rose. A high of 38 was forecast for today, with even warmer weather predicted for tomorrow. Accu-Weather said that, after dipping to about 30 degrees overnight, a high of 43 is expected tomorrow. A bitterly cold weekend is expected.
NEWS
February 11, 1994 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
They sent caravans into the north for it. They returned to the city and rebuilt their stock. Now thousands of tons of salt are again aimed at Philadelphia's highways in a barrage fired back at the winter that just won't quit. But hold on there, plow train. The bitter fact is that the same salt that keeps us moving could mean trouble down the road for bridges, highways, cars, trees and waterways. In fact, says the Department of Environmental Resources, "The most environmentally sound manner to deal with accumulated snow is to allow it to slowly melt where it falls.
NEWS
January 24, 1995
Winter's come to rolling, tree-lined Skippack Pike - Route 73 - in Montgomery County, and once the snow begins to fly, a half-dozen different township road crews will be spreading salt on it by the ton. Drivers, of course, won't notice much difference as they pass from one municipality to the next. But taxpayers up and down the Pike sure will: Because of cooperative purchasing, some township taxpayers will be paying a little more than half what their neighbors pay for road salt.
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REAL_ESTATE
May 16, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
My recent column announcing that I am painting the exterior of my house for the last time brought expressions of concern from those who don't like the words last time . And, thankfully, a couple of painting questions, which is the reason I write these columns. John Czuba's question concerning painting aluminum siding is one I have gotten before over the years, but it's one that always merits a response. Yes, you can paint aluminum siding, and the website of the Paint Quality Institute in Spring House is my go-to on all broad-brush matters.
NEWS
January 9, 2016
NEW YORK 17 salt miners rescued from shaft Seventeen miners spent a frigid night in a broken-down elevator in America's deepest salt mine, huddling with heat packs and blankets before being rescued early Thursday, an ordeal that highlighted the sometimes-risky work of churning out the road salt that keeps traffic moving on ice and snow. The workers were descending to start their shifts around 10 p.m. Wednesday when the roughly 5-by-6-foot car abruptly stopped about 90 stories below ground in the Cayuga salt mine while heading to a floor nearly deep enough to fit two Empire State Buildings stacked atop one another.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Ben Finley and Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writers
The man who died Thursday after a pile of road salt collapsed on him in a Bucks County storage facility was a married father of two from Mount Laurel, Burlington County. Gustav J. Propper, 51, was "an amazing father and a true family man," according to a brief statement released by his family Friday. "Everything he did was for his family. It's extremely tragic, and we're just beyond words," the statement read. Propper was operating a front-end loader for International Salt, a Lackawanna County-based company that has a storage facility at the Kinder Morgan Port of Bucks County, on the Delaware River in Falls Township.
NEWS
January 5, 2014 | By Ben Finley and Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writers
FALLS TOWNSHIP The man who died Thursday after a pile of road salt collapsed on him in a Bucks County storage facility was a married father of two from Mount Laurel, Burlington County. Gustav J. Propper, 51, was "an amazing father and a true family man," according to a brief statement released by his family Friday. "Everything he did was for his family. It's extremely tragic, and we're just beyond words," the statement read. Propper was operating a front-end loader for International Salt, a Lackawanna County-based company that has a storage facility at the Kinder Morgan Port of Bucks County, on the Delaware River in Falls Township.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: Our house was fitted with white aluminum siding by the prior owners decades ago. We've been in it about 16 years now. The siding has held up OK except in the front above the porch, which gets the morning sun. It is losing its paint. Is there a preferred method of dealing with this? Answer: Yes there is. And for advice about anything paint, I turn to the experts at the Paint Quality Institute in Spring House. First, how should you prepare old aluminum siding before painting?
NEWS
October 21, 2011
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced that dredging will begin Saturday in the 17-acre Fairless Turning Basin, adjacent to the Delaware River in Bucks County, to deepen the 37-foot basin to 40 feet, which is the same shipping depth as the river's main navigation channel. The $990,000 project will take about two weeks. The cost will be shared, 75 percent by the Corps and 25 percent by the Redevelopment Authority of Bucks County. The Bucks County port handles about four million tons of freight a year.
NEWS
March 3, 2011 | By Kathleen Brady Shea, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new weapon against snow and ice was used on selected Chester County roads and sidewalks this winter - beet juice. It was added to the salt-based brine put on roads before storms and enabled the solution to work at lower temperatures. But those trying to recall whether there were swaths of red-stained concrete, don't bother. "There's no redness at all," said Jack Stewart, a project manager for the county's Facilities Department. "When you put it down, it's more brownish and looks like the road is wet. " The substance is a by-product of sugar beets, which are used to make sweetener and animal feed, officials said.
NEWS
March 19, 2008 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Salt is the sworn enemy of steel-reinforced concrete, and it doesn't take much to cause a crack like the one that fouled up the I-95 bridge. Over the years, concrete can become permeated with road salt from a steady drip of wintry slush. If salt reaches the inner steel, it's the beginning of the end: corrosion. "Once you start getting salt brine down in there, it's a killer," said Harold Windisch, a senior construction engineer with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.
NEWS
March 18, 2008 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
"Stay off 95! Use mass transit if you can. And if you have to use the interstate, give yourself an extra hour or so to get to where you're going," said PennDot spokesman Gene Blaum, reacting to the repair emergency that forced the closure of an eight-exit section of the highway between Girard Avenue and the Betsy Ross Bridge that snarled detours all day and all night. And it will be the same tomorrow. As motorists braced for today's nasty commute, PennDot secretary Allen D. Bielher held out hope that the highway could be reopened by Wednesday night after crews underpin the affected section.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2007 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The little Morton salt girl is looking for a new home. Rohm & Haas Co. chief executive officer Raj Gupta said all options were on the table: keeping the snow-dependent Morton salt division, selling it, or spinning it off in an initial public offering, or IPO. By the end of the year, he recently told analysts, the Philadelphia company should "have a path forward. " The nation's largest and the most recognized brand of table salt, with the cute girl and her umbrella, the Morton division is "performing fantastically," he said.
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