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Road Show

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NEWS
November 19, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
The title suggests the wearying, shabby showbiz tour, the snake-oil carny con, the tattered vaudevillian hustle of a bygone entertainment. This is America - then and now - seen through the cynical, demanding eyes of Stephen Sondheim, who gives us in Road Show (a reworking of 2003's Bounce and 1999's Wise Guys) a thoroughly contemporary and deeply thoughtful entertainment. The stage at the Public Theater is littered with $100 bills. This is our world, Road Show tells us: daring, corrupt and sleazy, a waste of imagination and talent, a sell-out, a swindle.
NEWS
July 12, 1993 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
A Water Department employee surveys the scene yesterday on Hunting Park Avenue at 29th Street, where the road collapsed after a 48-inch water line broke. The break in the line, which takes water from the Green Lane Treatment Center to the East Park Reservoir, resulted in the loss of 3.5 million gallons of water, the department said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1989 | By Gene Seymour, Daily News Television Critic
As routine and predictable as most of CBS' fall offerings are, you have to give the network executives credit. There is a limit to how low they will sink to attract that all-important family audience. They didn't, for instance, take "Road Show" (8 p.m. on Channel 10), an unsold pilot that is tonight's entry in "CBS Summer Playhouse" - or, as comedian Robert Klein aptly named this form of programming, "Failure Theater. " Blessings on these CBS people for showing restraint and taste.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1999 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With initial public offerings still pumping out big first-day gains, selling stock to the public may look like a cinch. The lucky executives watch the first few trades of their freshly minted stock and - Voila! - instant millionaires. But in reality, the day of the offering is the finale of a nerve-racking trek known as the road show. This corporate ritual borrowed its name from Broadway, and the idea is the same: Take the company's sales pitch to the Fidelitys, Putnams and T. Rowe Prices of the world.
SPORTS
April 5, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Flyers will conclude their mostly disastrous road schedule when they face the scuffling Hurricanes on Saturday afternoon in Raleigh, N.C. A 10-20-10 road record is the chief reason the Flyers will miss the Stanley Cup playoffs for just the third time in the last 20 seasons. They will finish with their worst road record since 1991-92 (10-26-4). Excluding lockout-shortened seasons, you have to go back to 1971-72 (7-25-7) for a year in which the Flyers had fewer road victories.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | Inquirer photographs by Ron Tarver
A veterinarian who makes house calls isn't that unusual - unless she only makes house calls. That is what Susan Moiser of Lansdale has been doing for five years. The road show will end next year, when Moiser, who sees about five patients a day, moves into an office in Schwenksville.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1991 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
Now that Hollywood finds no subject indelicate, it's difficult to recall a time when hygiene was a euphemism for sexual relations and women were shamed into suicide if they got into trouble. But the puritanical attitude of the '30s and '40s was real (if perhaps superficial), and its aura is recaptured in Kit Parker Video's Sex and Buttered Popcorn (70 minutes, $29.95), a retrospective of the exploitation "nudie" movies that only hinted at what today's pornography makes very plain.
NEWS
January 11, 1995 | By Jeff Gelles and Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Ferko String Band's road show in Florida hit a sour note yesterday. A Ryder rental truck filled with treasured instruments, costumes and scenery - not to mention 100 dozen brand-new ostrich plumes - was stolen from the parking lot of their West Palm Beach motel. Anthony Celenza, the club's president, noticed yesterday morning that the truck was missing. It had sat, undisturbed, on the lot of the Best Western Motel the previous two nights. "I went out there about 10 - I was on my way to the beach - when I discovered it wasn't there anymore," Celenza said.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
G. Leonard Knapp, 78, of Sellersville, an elementary teacher and respected herpetologist - who saw snakes as a force in nature - died of a cerebral hemorrhage Monday, March 17, at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mr. Knapp taught school in the Pennridge district for 34 years, first at Hilltown Elementary School in 1962, and then at Sellersville Elementary School from 1966 until he retired in 1996. He also owned and operated Reptilrama, a road show of his own animals that he took to area fairs, festivals, birthday parties, and schools.
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NEWS
December 23, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
HOLLIS, N.H. - As he fielded questions from New Hampshire voters Sunday night - summoning emotional stories about the days after Hurricane Sandy - Gov. Christie turned the floor over to another governor. "If you've got a tough decision to make, Chris Christie's the right guy. Some people don't realize what a loving, caring guy he is," Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan told the crowd at the Peterborough town hall. He then recounted advice Christie gave him during the recent Baltimore riots: "He told me to get up to Baltimore, show some leadership.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Boz Scaggs is on a tour for his new album, A Fool to Care . He comes to Atlantic City's Borgata on July 31. He has a taste for travel. "I always wanted to be somewhere else than where I was," Scaggs says in that familiar voice. "Restless, I guess you'd call it. " During his teens, Scaggs busked throughout Europe, playing the blues and country songs of his Texas youth, tunes such as his new album's title track, penned by Ted Daffan in 1940; or Dorothy LaBostrie and McKinley Millet's "Rich Woman," also on A Fool to Care . "Growing up, when I wasn't listening to the radio," Scaggs says, "my dad was a traveling salesman, but he had a nice console stereo and a great record collection at home.
SPORTS
April 5, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Flyers will conclude their mostly disastrous road schedule when they face the scuffling Hurricanes on Saturday afternoon in Raleigh, N.C. A 10-20-10 road record is the chief reason the Flyers will miss the Stanley Cup playoffs for just the third time in the last 20 seasons. They will finish with their worst road record since 1991-92 (10-26-4). Excluding lockout-shortened seasons, you have to go back to 1971-72 (7-25-7) for a year in which the Flyers had fewer road victories.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
G. Leonard Knapp, 78, of Sellersville, an elementary teacher and respected herpetologist - who saw snakes as a force in nature - died of a cerebral hemorrhage Monday, March 17, at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mr. Knapp taught school in the Pennridge district for 34 years, first at Hilltown Elementary School in 1962, and then at Sellersville Elementary School from 1966 until he retired in 1996. He also owned and operated Reptilrama, a road show of his own animals that he took to area fairs, festivals, birthday parties, and schools.
BUSINESS
December 9, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Let the road show begin. Aramark, one of the world's leading purveyors of hot dogs and hospital gowns (among many other things), last week began pitching itself to potential investors. The Philadelphia company has undertaken its third IPO with a goal of raising at least $561 million after expenses to go toward paying off portions of its $5.8 billion debt. The first step in the sale is the so-called road show, in which company representatives make presentations to analysts, fund managers, and potential investors in hopes of boosting interest.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
Martin E. Zweig, 70, who predicted the 1987 stock-market crash and whose newsletters influenced U.S. investors for a quarter-century, died Monday, according to his New York-based firm. No cause of death was given. Mr. Zweig wrote Martin Zweig's Winning on Wall Street, his book first published in 1986, and newsletters such as the Zweig Forecast for 26 years. He cofounded Zweig-DiMenna Partners in 1984. "I was on the road show with Marty for the Zweig Fund in 1986 and he was like a rock star," Gene Glaser, a business partner with Mr. Zweig from 1989 to 1999, said.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Not so long ago, Pennsylvania political people would joke that Gov. Corbett was like Calvin Coolidge, a man so famous for his reticence that a woman at a White House dinner once tried to open him up by saying she had bet a friend she could make the president utter more than two words. "You lose," Coolidge famously replied. But all of a sudden, Corbett is everywhere. And he's voluble. He's been sitting down for get-to-know-me sessions with journalists, visiting newspaper editorial boards to build support for his coming assault on what he calls the budgetary "tapeworm" of public-employee pension costs, and swooping into Philadelphia to announce he will restore $20 million in general assistance for people with intellectual disabilities.
NEWS
October 8, 2012
Since delivering the keynote speech at the Republican convention, Gov. Christie has been to Missouri, North Carolina, Iowa, Utah, New Hampshire, Indiana, Washington, Montana, and North Dakota. Yes: Fargo, North Dakota. You would think he must be flying the country stumping hard for Mitt Romney, whom he endorsed a year ago. But he's not. His travels have mostly been to rally and raise cash for gubernatorial and Senate candidates. Until Saturday, when he was headlining a Romney fund-raiser in Michigan, and Tuesday, when he's scheduled to rally for Romney in Ohio, Christie hadn't done a single campaign event for the presidential candidate since the convention.
NEWS
July 3, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
" Eeew! " a handful of children exclaim as Havertown's P.J. Brennan displays how Civil War surgeons used a tourniquet to prep an injured soldier for amputation. "If you apply one of these on someone's leg," he says, holding the implement up, "that means you've already decided it has to go. " An actual physician - he's chief medical officer at the University of Pennsylvania - Brennan is one of two dozen Civil War reenactors camped out in Franklin Square in Center City for Civil War Weekend, one of many activities planned in Philadelphia this summer to commemorate the sesquicentennial of the Civil War. The event, which continues through Monday, features exhibit tables, a replica encampment, and the centerpiece: the Civil War Road Show, an interactive, multimedia exhibit in a 53-foot-long trailer.
NEWS
March 15, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charlie Sheen , late of Two and a Half Men , is sooo beloved, sooo popular, that tickets for the first two performances of his live show, set for April 2 in Detroit and April 3 in Chicago, sold out in 18 minutes, says the Detroit Free Press. Yes, the Vatican Assassin Warlock , as USA Today calls him, has concocted a live show called Charlie Sheen Live: My Violent Torpedo of Truth/Defeat Is Not an Option , and he may take it on national tour. Warlock also has made a short film (posted on RadarOnline.
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