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Road Work

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NEWS
July 17, 1988 | By Paul Davies, Special to The Inquirer
Construction of the entrance road to the 11-house Chestnut Hollow subdivision in Newlin Township is back on schedule for an Aug. 15 completion. Spurred by the supervisors' warning last month that they would act to halt construction of the development if the road were not completed on time, the developer has hired more people for the job, the board was told Monday night. The supervisors last month denied a request by the developer, Yorkbridge Associates of Kennett Square, for an extension to Oct. 11. They said the developer had plenty of time to get the work done and that the permanent road should be completed before more residents moved in. Supervisor Robert Pearson said Monday that the developer had three crews working on the project and that he expected the work to be completed on time.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | By Steve Edgcumbe, Special to The Inquirer
A proposal to redesign the intersection of Route 30 and Central Avenue in Willistown Township, near Paoli Memorial Hospital, has drawn criticism from residents and business owners in the area. The plan was presented to township supervisors Tuesday. Township manager William A. Rosenberry, who presented the proposal, said the hospital first approached the township about the project in 1986. The proposed road improvements would eliminate a V-like right turn onto Central Avenue for drivers heading west on Route 30. After a short distance, Central Avenue intersects with Industrial Boulevard, which goes off to the left and runs north along one side of the hospital.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | By Christine Donato, Special to The Inquirer
The Ambler Borough Council must come up with $26,000 to make a series of additions to a four-year-old road reconstruction plan. The council voted, 8-1, this week to approve additional traffic-light wiring, drainage repair and resurfacing work on Butler Avenue. The cost of that work will push the total for reconstruction to about $836,000, $26,000 above the project's cap, set in 1986. A Federal Highway Administration grant will pay for 75 percent of expenses, up to $810,000, but the borough is responsible for all expenses above that.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
For the third year in a row, Upper Moreland Township will have to borrow money to maintain its roads. At a meeting Monday night, the Board of Commissioners voted unanimously to borrow $300,000 from Bank & Trust Co. of Old York Road to pay for badly needed improvements to township streets. The five-year note, which carries an interest rate of 6.25 percent, marks the third time in three years that Upper Moreland has needed to finance its highway program. In each of the last two years, the township borrowed $250,000.
NEWS
July 27, 1988 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delanco's expectation of a fast getaway from the gate in a revitalized 1988 road-repair program has run into a slight snag. Not a single bid was received from a contractor for the first project advertised. "It was a big shock," said Richard Mueller, a member of the township committee and chairman of the public works committee. "We want them done bad. And we don't want to lose any time. " Eight streets are scheduled for repair or rebuilding this year, but no bids had been received by July 19, when bids were scheduled to be opened on the first two to be rebuilt, Princeton and West Avenues.
NEWS
February 25, 1999 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
That nightmare of a highway interchange - Route 202 and the Schuylkill Expressway in King of Prussia - scene of two horrific crashes and two deaths this month, will be brought up to 21st-century standards. "That pretzel of an intersection, built in the 1950s for 70,000 daily vehicles going 40 mph, will be rebuilt to handle what we have now - 100,000 to 150,000 vehicles going 60-plus miles per hour," said PennDOT district administrator Andrew L. Warren yesterday at the agency's St. Davids headquarters.
NEWS
February 27, 2001
Not long ago, everywhere I drove, some form of construction would be on the roads. They'd dig up the roads and perhaps get around to fixing them eventually. Under Mayor Street, I see no roadwork anywhere. What happened to the city budget? The potholes and problems with the streets haven't disappeared. I'd like something done about this before my car becomes a scrap heap. JAPHY RYDER Philadelphia
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | By Carolyn Gretton, Special to The Inquirer
The Newtown Township Supervisors have voted to file suit against developer Ferguson & Flynn Inc. to force the company to finish road work in the Woods at Saxony development. The 3-2 vote Monday also requested that township solicitor Steve Harris look into whether the township had the money to finish the road improvements itself if the lawsuit proved unsuccessful. The decision was made after Harris told the supervisors his negotiations with Ferguson & Flynn had resulted in little more than the patching of a few potholes.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | By Richard Kleiman, Special to The Inquirer
On rainy days, water runs down what was supposed to be John Tscherne's sidewalk and washes away stones and earth from his front yard. Tscherne lives on Poppy Lane in the West Meadows development, located off Prospect Avenue in West Grove, where work stopped earlier this year, leaving roads unpaved, sidewalks and curbs unfinished, and - because the roads have not been legally adopted by the borough - only partial local police protection for 85...
NEWS
August 27, 1986 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a close call, but Philadelphia's 15th annual Old City Labor Day Weekend Festival has survived the black hole on Second Street. After denying permission for the festival last week, city officials have changed their minds and decided to allow this weekend's festival to go on. The problem was a construction project that has one lane of Second Street, normally used for the festival, torn up from just below Market Street to Walnut Street....
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NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
In Bellmawr, the "Direct Connection" project has upset mourners at New St. Mary's Cemetery, released dust clouds onto Little League fields on Essex Avenue, and worried residents of a dozen doomed homes in the Bellmawr Park neighborhood. "Bellmawr people are putting up with a lot," says Frank Filipek, longtime mayor of the blue-collar borough of 11,500, citing construction-damaged water mains, frequently muddy roads, and added traffic congestion. The state's $900 million effort to reconstruct the complicated confluence of Interstates 295 and 76 and Route 42 in Camden County broke ground in March 2013 and will not be finished until 2021.
SPORTS
December 29, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Flyers have been a tale of two teams lately. They have won nine straight games at home, and have lost five in a row on the road, which is where they will be for the next six games. The trip starts Saturday night in Edmonton. The Oilers will be playing their second game in as many nights, and Edmonton goalie Ilya Bryzgalov will get the call against his former teammates. "I'm sure they'll play him," Flyers winger Scott Hartnell said with a smile after Friday's practice in Voorhees.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
BAY HEAD, N.J. - The state Transportation Department is reversing gears on its ambitious plan to rebuild a road ravaged by Hurricane Sandy. The department originally planned to start work on the $215 million Route 35 project in Ocean County this summer. It now plans to wait until September to do the most disruptive parts of the plan. Instead of regrading and repaving the highway, the state will work on pumps and drainage improvements that won't require traffic to stop or lanes to be closed during the summer heavy-traffic months.
NEWS
November 18, 2012
With more and more roads leading back to Pennsylvania's transportation funding crisis these days, Gov. Corbett and Harrisburg lawmakers should be finding their way to a solution - and soon. They have one possible route already: Corbett's own advisory panel last year charted a nearly painless course of raising driver fees and the wholesale gas tax to bring in $2.5 billion more for highways, bridges, and mass transit. The governor is on record as well that something must be done to meet deferred maintenance, which has left the state with crumbling roads, deteriorating bridges, and SEPTA and other mass transit systems across the state having to scale back on key upgrades.
NEWS
June 23, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
The official temperature was in the mid-90s, but the unofficial reading was about 200 degrees Fahrenheit on the blacktop cauldron where Steve Wilson and his colleagues were earning their pay Thursday. "You can actually feel the heat coming off the asphalt," said Peter Scerati Jr., the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation on-site manager in charge of the road-repair crew, who would end up having an adventurous afternoon in Montgomery County. Sun-absorbing asphalt is a prime contributor to the "heat island" effect that makes urbanized areas all the more unbearable during hot spells.
SPORTS
February 18, 2011 | By Kevin Tatum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thursday was getaway day for the Penn basketball team, which left for Providence, R.I., and Friday night's Ivy League contest against the Brown Bears. It will be the Quakers' fourth straight road game in conference play. Their visit to Yale on Saturday will add to the string of away games. Penn, 9-12 overall and on a four-game losing streak, is 3-4 in the Ancient Eight after facing each team in the league once. The Quakers are beginning the second half this weekend against the two squads they opened up successfully against at home in late January.
NEWS
October 19, 2010
Those who drive Route 202 between Sumneytown Pike and Welsh Road in Montgomery County may want to find another route this week, as workers lay utilities and widen lanes for the new Route 202 Parkway. Jenny Robinson, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation's spokeswoman, said Monday that drivers should expect delays between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. as cars are directed into an alternating lane of traffic in Upper and Lower Gwynedd Townships. Drivers should expect restrictions on left turns at Welsh Road and Route 202 in Upper Gwynedd and Montgomery Townships, Robinson said.
NEWS
March 4, 2010 | By Edward Colimore, Kathleen Brady Shea, and Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
They're showing up everywhere, jarring highway motorists, and turning neighborhood streets and parking lots into obstacle courses. Masquerading as puddles, they blow tires, crush wheels, and send cars limping to repair shops. Potholes are so numerous that some local officials have scheduled public-works crews on weekends to handle the backlog of complaints. "My car was the third one in 10 minutes to flatten a tire on the same pothole" in Winslow Township, said Michelle Vitucci of Sicklerville.
NEWS
February 18, 2010 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Fatalities on Keystone State highways reached a record low last year, according to Pennsylvania Department of Transportation officials, who credited a combination of road improvements and stepped-up enforcement targeting aggressive and drunken driving. In 2009, 1,256 people died in crashes, less than the previous low, set in 1944, when 1,328 deaths were recorded, PennDot secretary Allen D. Biehler said in a news release yesterday. The department began keeping records in 1928. "There was no one factor that led to the record," PennDot spokeswoman Erin Waters said.
NEWS
May 6, 2008 | By DAVE DAVIES, daviesd@phillynews.com 215-854-2595
What would possess Ken Weinstein, a responsible business owner, to write to Gov. Rendell denouncing his "press propaganda" and "lack of respect" for community businesses? PennDOT. Germantown Avenue, in front of Weinstein's Trolley Car diner in Mount Airy, has been ripped up since January for a road reconstruction project that's weeks behind schedule. Weinstein said he has lost a third of his business, has laid off 20 percent of his staff, and has seen his electricity and water service disappear at times.
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