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Roast Beef

FOOD
March 31, 1999 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Easter dinner is a traditional meal in many households, and most often, the centerpiece of the menu is as established as the family itself. Depending on ethnic background, beliefs or taste, that entree often is roast lamb or beef, baked ham, or some other item chosen to usher in spring. Whatever the choice, it's not likely to change. But you can give that familiar meal a new look and a fresh taste with some different side dishes and sauces. Forget the mint jelly and the pineapple glaze.
NEWS
March 30, 1999 | By Martin Z. Braun, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After the jokes had been told, the plaques read, and the cop stories remembered, it was retired Audubon Police Chief William V. Taulane's turn. Taulane, who was regaled and roasted by 200 people at the Riviera party house Saturday night, stood at the head table, microphone in hand, and thanked his colleagues and the community of Audubon. "It has been 27 great years," said Taulane, 56, who served 27 years with the Audubon police - 15 as its chief, before stepping down in early January.
NEWS
May 23, 1998 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For decades, Bung's Bar & Grille, a tiny tavern on Route 130, has been home to locally-famed clam chowder and roast beef - and to generations of local politicians. "We pile in there and have a pizza and hang out," said Kevin McLernon, business administrator in nearby Burlington Township. "We all go. " In the bar's back room, which contains a dartboard and is almost filled up with a wooden table large enough for four, owner Hatch Hiros tells stories of horseshoe contests and scavenger hunts, all the while dropping names.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
John H. "June Bug" Smith Jr., who spent a good part of his life tossing wood on other people's woodpiles, died Wednesday. He was 76 and lived in East Mount Airy. Just saying the name "June Bug" could make people smile, and his entering the room could make those smiles bigger. He got the name as a kid when the family called him "Jun," short for Junior. Then a little neighborhood girl added "Bug" and he was branded for life. In later years, when he met new friends, he asked to be introduced, and introduced himself, as John.
NEWS
December 24, 1997 | by Sara Eckel
It's one of those stories you read with disbelief. An 11-year-old girl was found in a decrepit New York City apartment building this month. The girl was covered with sores and living in filth. She was dazed and by all indications had been sexually abused. And she had never gone to school. Immediately, the questions began: Didn't the neighbors know about this? Why didn't they say anything? How could they let this go on? At first, neighbors denied knowledge of the child's existence.
SPORTS
September 3, 1997 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
For their season opener, it was clear, the Eagles fielded a version of dead men walking. What wasn't known at the time - and perhaps would have mitigated some of the harsh criticism that followed - was that some pretty important players actually felt deathly sick. Which might help explain, in part, their sickly performance in a 31-17 loss to the Giants. Eagles medical personnel confirmed yesterday that at least half the team suffered from a stomach virus last week. The sickness originally was thought to originate from a charity function the team attended last Tuesday night.
FOOD
August 29, 1997 | by Ken Hoffman, For the Daily News
This week I reached out for a Chicken, Bacon and Swiss Sandwich at Arby's. Chicken? Hey, I'm all for diversity - in the workplace. But what's a chicken sandwich doing at Arby's, which specializes in roast beef sandwiches? Even the restaurant's name says it: Roast beef. R-B. Ar-by. If this Chicken, Bacon and Swiss thing takes off, Arby's will have to change its name to C-B-S, and that will only confuse Dan Rather even more. Here's the blueprint: a breaded fried chicken breast, Swiss cheese, slices of thick, peppered bacon and creamy honey mustard on a plain hamburger bun. Total calories: 595. Fat grams: 29. I loved this sandwich.
SPORTS
August 28, 1997 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Eagles have seen the enemy, and it is . . . Roast beef. Or was it the ribs? Either way, it can't be a good omen when a well-meaning preseason charity function leads to food poisoning for at least half a dozen players, as well as some of their wives. Three starters - Chris T. Jones, Mike Mamula and Joe Panos - missed practice yesterday after contracting food poisoning at the Eagles' annual United Way Kickoff function Tuesday night. Several other players, including Ricky Watters, James Willis and Darion Conner, were sick but managed to get on the field yesterday.
NEWS
April 12, 1997 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
Like spring, it started out with promise, albeit two weeks late. The electric-green Phillie Phanatic materialized from out of thin air with the game ball during a magic trick at second base. Then, the mascot and relief star Ricky Bottalico plucked bright-eyed 8-year-old C.J. Small from upper-deck purgatory to christen the season by throwing out the first pitch. He threw a strike. And to top it off, Phils ace Curt Schilling - the man who probably will have to win every game he pitches for the team to have a prayer at post-season play - was on the mound with a 2-0 record.
FOOD
February 26, 1997 | By Steven Raichlen, FOR THE INQUIRER
I am a hash hound. No, I don't mean narcotics, although I do find this dish addicting. I'm talking about a classic American breakfast dish, a delicacy found at greasy spoons and roadhouses. Let sophisticates have their omelets and eggs Benedict. I raise my fork for hash. Our word "hash" comes from the French term hacher (to chop). (Hash has the same etymological root as that chopping device, the hatchet.) Hash is certainly a venerable dish: The English diarist Samuel Pepys waxed grandiloquent about a rabbit hash he savored in 1662.
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