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Robben Island

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NEWS
March 19, 1997 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The half-hour boat ride to Robben Island is much less ominous now to Eddie Daniels than it was when he first took the voyage 33 years ago. In 1964, Daniels traveled to the island shackled in the hold of a ferry whose portholes had been painted black, preventing him from seeing the slowly receding skyline of his hometown, Cape Town. He was condemned to the bleak prison to serve a 15-year sentence for sabotage. One day recently the same vessel that carried Daniels as a prisoner ferried him and about 140 other tourists to the island, where they were greeted at the dock by smiling tour guides dressed in bright African shirts rather than stern prison guards dressed in khaki.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Arthur Chaskalson, 81, a civil rights lawyer who once helped defend Nelson Mandela and later became South Africa's chief justice, has died. South Africa's presidency confirmed Mr. Chaskalson's death Saturday. The state-owned South African Broadcasting Corp. said he had been battling leukemia. Mr. Chaskalson was one of several lawyers on the defense team that challenged the apartheid government's prosecution of members of the African National Congress for sabotage in the 1960s case known as the Rivonia Trial.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | By Rick Lyman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the salty wind whipping her chalk-white hair and a periwinkle-blue cardigan flapping on her shoulders, Pat Jordan stared at the rocky coast of Robben Island - South Africa's Alcatraz - and saw an entirely different island blossoming in the sun. "There will be a yacht harbor and nature trails and a very nice Victorian village with tea shops and antique book stores," said Jordan, a member of the local tourism commission, part of an inspection team...
NEWS
December 7, 2013
An irony of Nelson Mandela's life is that the African National Congress freedom fighter will forever be remembered as a man of peace. That could not have been envisioned in 1961, when Mandela helped persuade the ANC that violence was necessary to get whites to share power with South Africa's black majority. Since 1912, the ANC had peaceably sought equality, but to no avail. So its leaders listened to Mandela and other militants in the ANC Youth League, including Walter Sisulu and Oliver Tambo.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
The Island , by Athol Fugard, in collaboration with actors John Kani and Winston Ntshona, is about a real island in South Africa, the site of a notorious prison. If you've been there, you know how stark and oppressive Robben Island is, despite its having now become - merely, happily - a tourist site. Nelson Mandela, among thousands of others, was imprisoned there under the grim laws of apartheid and participated in the events the play recounts. Fugard, long admired as the courageous theatrical spokesman for human rights in his native country, gives us just a glimpse of what it must have felt like to be trapped, physically and psychologically, in South Africa.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
It was good that Nelson Mandela finally broke his silence the other day about conditions inside the worst of South Africa's prisons. Mandela is not the type to cop sympathy with tales of hard times. But it was important for people who are just beginning to learn about this remarkable man to know that he didn't spend much of his past 27 years, six months and 11 days in that comfortable bungalow at Victor Verster Prison Farm. The giant of the African National Congress wasn't moved to Verster until after he was hospitalized for tuberculosis in August 1988.
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | BY JACK McKINNEY
In 1964, Allister Sparks showed the acumen that would earn him distinction as South Africa's premier journalist when he wrote that the government would have future cause to celebrate its decision to spare the life of Nelson Mandela. But from Mandela's forthcoming autobiography we now learn that the apartheid state almost snuffed out its lone chance for redemption when it plotted to kill him in a staged escape attempt only five years later. At the conclusion of the celebrated "Rivonia Trial" of 1964, Mandela was found guilty under the catch-all Suppression of Communism Act and sentenced to life imprisonment on bleak Robben Island, along with African National Congress comrades Walter Sisulu and Ahmed Kathrada.
NEWS
April 30, 1991 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two weeks ago, Peter-Paul Ngwenya was sitting in a cell on Robben Island, a third of the way through a 15-year term for planning to shoot down a South African jet fighter with a Soviet surface-to-air missile in the service of the African National Congress. The future didn't look so bright. Then, a guard summoned him over. "He looked at me, and he laughed," Ngwenya said. "He told me, 'You are going home.' I couldn't believe it. I wanted to go out and begin screaming with joy. " Ngwenya, 37, was released under the terms of an agreement called the "Pretoria Minute," signed Aug. 6 by the ANC and the white government of President F.W. de Klerk.
NEWS
March 28, 1998 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Seizing on his status as one of the world's most adored heroes, South African President Nelson Mandela publicly lectured President Clinton yesterday as no other head of state has, imploring him to deal directly with America's enemies. Mandela defended his friendships with dictators Fidel Castro of Cuba and Moammar Gadhafi of Libya - who provided money and military equipment in the battle against South Africa's forced racial separation - and used his experience as a political prisoner turned president to caution that peace can be achieved only by engaging one's foes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2002 | By HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
ALL YOU "Friends"-aholics who've been gearing up to say goodbye this May have been given another reprieve. The Daily Variety Web site reported Saturday that NBC and Warner Bros., the show's producer, have agreed to a 10th season. NBC will pay about $10 million per episode, making "Friends" by far the most expensive prime-time half-hour in history. The surprising part of the story is that stars Jennifer Aniston, Courteney Cox, Lisa Kudrow, Matt LeBlanc, Matthew Perry and David Schwimmer agreed to the extra season without getting a raise.
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NEWS
December 7, 2013
An irony of Nelson Mandela's life is that the African National Congress freedom fighter will forever be remembered as a man of peace. That could not have been envisioned in 1961, when Mandela helped persuade the ANC that violence was necessary to get whites to share power with South Africa's black majority. Since 1912, the ANC had peaceably sought equality, but to no avail. So its leaders listened to Mandela and other militants in the ANC Youth League, including Walter Sisulu and Oliver Tambo.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Listening to reports of Nelson Mandela's failing health, I can't help thinking how different the world would be if the former South African leader could have been cloned. So many times, in countries plagued by sectarian conflicts and bloodshed, I've heard people say: "If only we had a Mandela. " Mandela's genius was his ability to forgive former enemies, along with a charisma that persuaded his black countrymen to do likewise - and convinced his white countrymen that he meant what he said.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
Arthur Chaskalson, 81, a civil rights lawyer who once helped defend Nelson Mandela and later became South Africa's chief justice, has died. South Africa's presidency confirmed Mr. Chaskalson's death Saturday. The state-owned South African Broadcasting Corp. said he had been battling leukemia. Mr. Chaskalson was one of several lawyers on the defense team that challenged the apartheid government's prosecution of members of the African National Congress for sabotage in the 1960s case known as the Rivonia Trial.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
The Island , by Athol Fugard, in collaboration with actors John Kani and Winston Ntshona, is about a real island in South Africa, the site of a notorious prison. If you've been there, you know how stark and oppressive Robben Island is, despite its having now become - merely, happily - a tourist site. Nelson Mandela, among thousands of others, was imprisoned there under the grim laws of apartheid and participated in the events the play recounts. Fugard, long admired as the courageous theatrical spokesman for human rights in his native country, gives us just a glimpse of what it must have felt like to be trapped, physically and psychologically, in South Africa.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2002 | By HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
ALL YOU "Friends"-aholics who've been gearing up to say goodbye this May have been given another reprieve. The Daily Variety Web site reported Saturday that NBC and Warner Bros., the show's producer, have agreed to a 10th season. NBC will pay about $10 million per episode, making "Friends" by far the most expensive prime-time half-hour in history. The surprising part of the story is that stars Jennifer Aniston, Courteney Cox, Lisa Kudrow, Matt LeBlanc, Matthew Perry and David Schwimmer agreed to the extra season without getting a raise.
NEWS
December 22, 2002 | By Jennifer Dorazio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Actress Jane Fonda visited a refugee camp and a hospital in the West Bank yesterday, capping a three-day visit aimed at promoting peace. Fonda, who was observing her 65th birthday, passed through a West Bank crossing point of Qalqiliya, trudging through mud and clutching a bouquet of red roses given to her by a Palestinian women's group. She and playwright Eve Ensler, author of The Vagina Monologues, toured West Bank villages and nearby Jewish settlements and was led through a Palestinian refugee camp near Ramallah in a daylong tour by the Jerusalem Center for Women.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | By Trudy Rubin
Setting off for Robben Island, the barren outpost off Capetown where Nelson Mandela spent most of his 27 years as a political prisoner, you meet one of his former guards - who operates the souvenir shop. Another former guard pilots the boat. Nothing more perfectly captures the Mandela phenomenon. The man spent years in a concrete cell so tiny that his head and feet touched the walls as he slept, but he made a friend of his Afrikaner warder. His emphasis on reconciliation was the key to South Africa's miraculous shift from apartheid to democracy.
NEWS
March 28, 1998 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Seizing on his status as one of the world's most adored heroes, South African President Nelson Mandela publicly lectured President Clinton yesterday as no other head of state has, imploring him to deal directly with America's enemies. Mandela defended his friendships with dictators Fidel Castro of Cuba and Moammar Gadhafi of Libya - who provided money and military equipment in the battle against South Africa's forced racial separation - and used his experience as a political prisoner turned president to caution that peace can be achieved only by engaging one's foes.
NEWS
March 27, 1998 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a scene unimaginable just a few years ago, President Clinton walked side by side with South African President Nelson Mandela yesterday on his way to becoming the first American president to address this country's multiracial parliament. Clinton spoke of healing and of partnership. But it wasn't Clinton's words that made history; it was his mere presence in the high Victorian structure that, until recently, ordained apartheid. The democratic South Africa that rose from the vestiges of forced racial separation represents a powerful symbol to the world that it is possible to overcome deep and profound divisions, Clinton told a hushed chamber of blacks, whites and Asians.
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | By Thomas Kirkpatrick
Atonement after years of deception and outrage requires a special breed. Maybe it's a vodka-soaked brawler, a give-as-good-as-he-gets veteran of Moscow infighting who knows how to win elections despite a bum ticker, breakaway republics and assaults by disaffected wanna-bes. Or maybe it's someone from a different profile: the foster son of a Thembu chief, a kid who became a hungry Johannesburg student and law clerk, a 1950s Youth League organizer within a reborn African National Congress, an underground leader made political prisoner in 1964.
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