CollectionsRobert Bork
IN THE NEWS

Robert Bork

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 18, 2006 | By DEBORAH LEAVY
WHY DOES Samuel Alito appear to be coasting toward confirmation when Robert Bork, his ideological sibling, was denied a seat on the Supreme Court? Alito's bland face, thinning hair and glasses made him look like the nerd in the next cubicle in the office. He was soft-spoken, modest and calm in responding to senators. When asked the hard questions, Alito, like John Roberts before him, carefully recited the tests to be applied and the factors to be considered. But he gave no clues about his own views, or the legal framework within which he would weigh various factors, or the ideological prism through which he - like every other judge - approaches every case.
NEWS
September 6, 1987
Love him or hate him, few would deny that Robert H. Bork has compiled an impressive record as one of the leading conservative legal thinkers of our times. But the White House, in an effort to persuade the nation that he should be confirmed as a Supreme Court justice, is now ludicrously trying to portray him as a "mainstream moderate. " Last month the White House issued a report purporting to assess Judge Bork's legal philosophy. It portrayed him as as a champion of civil rights and free speech, as a clone of moderate former Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr., and as a judge whose opinions have been so sweetly reasoned that not one has been overturned by the Supreme Court.
SPORTS
November 30, 1990 | By Craig Donnelly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Bork resigned as general manager of Philadelphia Park yesterday, with settlement on the sale of the Bensalem track to Greenwood Racing Inc. set for today. Bill Hogwood, chief operating officer for Greenwood, said yesterday that he would be the temporary general manager at Philadelphia Park until a successor to Bork was selected. Bork will maintain his job with International Thoroughbred Breeders' Inc. as general manager at Garden State Park. ITB is expected to complete the $71 million sale of Philadelphia Park to Greenwood this afternoon in New York.
NEWS
September 20, 1987
A funny thing has happened to Judge Robert H. Bork on his way to the Supreme Court. He has evolved before the nation's eyes, like a figure in a natural history tableau - Neanderthal, Cro-Magnon, Modern - shedding a past, a style even, that would seem to cast him with the "bug-eyed zealots" that Wyoming's Republican Sen. Alan Simpson says populate the ranks of Judge Bork's opposition. If once, in 1963, Mr. Bork found that landmark civil rights legislation would work a hardship upon white supremacists (it was their lunch counters, after all)
NEWS
October 27, 1989 | BY CAL THOMAS
In his brilliant new book, "The Tempting of America: The Political Seduction of the Law," Robert Bork charts the decline of the legal establishment, and lays much of the blame at the feet of politically influenced jurists. Judges, Bork believes, should be bound by a strict interpretation of the law, for if they are not, "who is to protect us from the power of judges? How are we to be guarded from our guardians? The answer can only be that judges must consider themselves bound by law that is independent of their own views of the desirable.
NEWS
July 14, 1987
There must be no rush to judgment on the nomination of Robert H. Bork to the U.S. Supreme Court. In fact, precisely because the Bork nomination is especially sensitive, it is especially important for the Senate to review his nomination with the most thorough, painstaking care it can muster before rendering a verdict upon him. Unfortunately, Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D., Del.), who will chair Judge Bork's confirmation hearings, seems to have other ideas. After meeting with leaders of several liberal activist groups opposed to Judge Bork, who sits on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, Mr. Biden said that he intends to lead Senate opposition to his confirmation.
NEWS
October 16, 1987 | By REGINALD STUART, Daily News Staff Writer
The Senate Judiciary Committee, in its final report on the nomination of Robert Bork for the Supreme Court, said yesterday that Bork's views indicate a "perilous inclination" for a person seeking to guide the nation's future. In defense of the controversial judge, however, a minority of the panel's members said criticism of Bork was the result of "misunderstandings" by his critics. The Bork defenders said that Bork's record and testimony at the committee's 12-day hearing last month, "place him well within the conservative mainstream of American jurisprudence.
NEWS
July 7, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Rep. Richard Gephardt, a Democratic presidential contender, yesterday joined growing calls in his party for the Senate to reject the nomination of Robert Bork to the Supreme Court. Speaking to a convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Missouri congressman said Bork's appointment could be a disaster for the civil rights movement in the United States. "Just as we were ready to put Ronald Reagan behind us, his power of judicial appointment has, like a hand from the grave, reached far into the next century to threaten all the progress of the last 50 years," Gephardt told the organization.
NEWS
July 20, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
The president of the National Urban League blasted the Reagan administration yesterday for its failure to appoint more blacks to federal courts and demanded that Robert Bork not be allowed to sit on the Supreme Court. "History will judge Ronald Reagan harshly as the man who had the power to reconcile the races, but who failed to even try," John E. Jacob said in a speech to more than 2,000 delegates at the National Urban League's annual convention in Houston. An estimated 17,000 people are expected to attend events at the conference, which continues through Wednesday.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | BY MOLLY IVINS
Fans of the legal thrillers of John Grisham may recall the fictional Supreme Court justice in "The Pelican Brief" whose legal philosophy was government over business, the individual over government, the environment over everything. And the Indians, give them whatever they want. Sounded like a swell fellow to me, although I think giving all of Montana to the Indians is probably a trifle excessive. They probably wouldn't want Butte anyway; being fond of Butte requires an extremely advanced, possibly even slightly perverse, sensibility.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Matthew Barakat and Mark Sherman, Associated Press
McLEAN, Va. - Robert H. Bork, 85, who stepped in to fire the Watergate prosecutor at Richard Nixon's behest and whose failed 1987 nomination to the Supreme Court helped draw the modern boundaries of cultural fights over abortion, civil rights and other issues, died Wednesday from heart complications at a hospital in Arlington, Va. Brilliant, blunt and piercingly witty, Robert Heron Bork had a long career in the law that took him from respected academic...
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Somewhere along the line, the Supreme Court justices turned into media celebrities. As one of the three pillars of government, the court has always drawn attention and reaction. But this week has seen a nearly unprecedented media explosion in Washington - touched off not by a decision, but by the argument phase of the court challenge to the Affordable Care Act. That tells two tales: the huge significance of a decision that may affect not only the vexed one-sixth of the U.S. economy that is health care, but also the national election in November; and the mad proliferation of 24/7, voracious, instantly celebrifying media coverage.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arlin Adams has had a front-row seat for much of modern American history. During 65 years as a respected federal appeals court judge, litigator, and, even at times, a political operative, Adams has had the ear of national leaders. For a time in the late 1960s, Adams was a protege of former President Richard Nixon, who put Adams on a short list for the U.S. Supreme Court, a seat that eventually went to William Rehnquist. He was close with former Pennsylvania Gov. William Scranton and with Walter Annenberg, a confidant of Ronald Reagan who urged the president to nominate Adams for the Supreme Court when it became clear that Annenberg's preferred candidate, Robert Bork, had run into trouble during Senate confirmation hearings.
NEWS
January 5, 2011
AS THE U.S. SENATE gavels in a new session today, it'll be the first in 30 years without Arlen Specter. It seems a good day to share some favorite Specter memories. This isn't about his legacy or unparalleled ability to be different things (Darlin' or Snarlin') to different people at different times. This is about, from a journalistic view, the joy of covering much of his career. From "borking" Bork to harassing Hill to his "not proven" vote on Clinton's impeachment, Arlen almost always managed to provide entertaining copy.
NEWS
May 16, 2010 | By Michael Smerconish
He has angered me, too. In my case, it was in 1987, when Arlen Specter was torpedoing the Supreme Court nomination of Robert Bork. I then believed Bork was qualified. At the time, Specter said he had "substantial doubt as to how [Bork] would apply fundamental principles of constitutional law. " I'm not alone. Over the years, Specter has upset just about everybody at one time or another. Conservatives have been angry about Specter's treatment of Bork, his "not proven" vote in the Clinton impeachment, and his support for stem cell research.
NEWS
July 16, 2009 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The last two times the Senate Judiciary Committee grilled a Supreme Court nominee, Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania sat at the head of the long curved table and ran the show. When it was his turn yesterday to question Judge Sonia Sotomayor, though, Specter was seated at the far edge of things with the other most junior Democrats - just after Ted Kaufman of Delaware and just before Al Franken of Minnesota, the last in line. "It's a matter of what the senator says, not where the senator sits," Specter said in an interview.
NEWS
January 21, 2006 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr., in written responses to questions from Senate Democrats, said that most law-school professors were "generally believed" to be left of center, and that he had supported the failed nomination of Robert Bork to the Supreme Court because of Bork's reputation for judicial restraint. Alito's answers, released yesterday by Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.), chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, added new detail and context to his testimony before the committee last week.
NEWS
January 18, 2006 | By DEBORAH LEAVY
WHY DOES Samuel Alito appear to be coasting toward confirmation when Robert Bork, his ideological sibling, was denied a seat on the Supreme Court? Alito's bland face, thinning hair and glasses made him look like the nerd in the next cubicle in the office. He was soft-spoken, modest and calm in responding to senators. When asked the hard questions, Alito, like John Roberts before him, carefully recited the tests to be applied and the factors to be considered. But he gave no clues about his own views, or the legal framework within which he would weigh various factors, or the ideological prism through which he - like every other judge - approaches every case.
NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By John Yoo
President Bush stepped to the plate Monday to nominate a replacement for Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. He leads a party with 55 votes in the Senate and has just appointed to the Supreme Court a conservative chief justice widely hailed as one of the most qualified nominees in recent memory. The President swung and missed. His choice of his counsel, Harriet Miers, passes up a rare opportunity to change the direction of the Supreme Court. O'Connor provided decisive votes for affirmative action in colleges and universities, against bans on partial-birth abortion, against posting of the Ten Commandments in public spaces, and for the legal recognition of gay rights.
NEWS
October 4, 2005 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
SO IT'S TIME for Round Two in Bush vs. Senate, otherwise known as "Advise and Consent. " With John Roberts now occupying the center chair on the high court, the nation turns its attention to Harriet Miers, the president's nominee to replace Sandra Day O'Connor and quite possibly shift the balance of power to the right. While the Roberts nomination was momentous, it was in many ways a symbolic flexing of the president's muscle. Roberts replaced William Rehnquist, an established conservative who, before Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas joined the court, was the liberal's Darth Vader, adjudicating from the dark side.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|