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Robert Johnson

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NEWS
February 27, 1991 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
The church cemetery was thick with weeds and covered with tangled vines, its scattered tombstones overturned and unattended, when unexpectedly it became famous - for a man no one remembered. Robert Johnson, the legendary musician who some recall as the greatest country blues artist in history, was buried under the rubble and brush, according to state records. At first, the Rev. James Ratliff Jr. was unimpressed. "I never heard of the fellow," remembers Mr. Ratliff, pastor of Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church, a tiny Mississippi Delta congregation nestled in a soybean field near Morgan City.
SPORTS
July 10, 2000 | By Brian Miller, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Rod Johnson has always worn his baseball heart on his sleeve, whether it was as an all-American player at Temple University, later as a professional in the Cincinnati Reds farm system, or as the coach of the Spring City and Paoli American Legion teams. To say that Johnson is competitive would be an understatement. But that competitiveness is something that Johnson is proud of, because it comes from his father, who recently died after a long battle with cancer. The Rev. Robert Johnson was 65 years old when he finally succumbed on June 20. "People would see me literally running into walls as a player and then exhibiting such competitiveness as coach, and they'd wonder where did I get that from," Rod Johnson said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1998 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The myth lives on, and continues to grow. Robert Johnson recorded just 29 songs in his short life, yet 60 years after his death, the shadowy Mississippi bluesman has become one of the most powerful icons in American musical history. This much was clear from "Hellhound on My Trail: Robert Johnson and the Blues," the weeklong conference put together by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum that drew to a close with a concert last night featuring the Allman Brothers, Taj Mahal, Cassandra Wilson and Keb Mo, among others.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Robert Johnson attended Warren Buffett's most recent Berkshire Hathaway shareholders meeting, and on the flight out to Nebraska he was pleasantly surprised to learn that the book he had authored, Strategic Value Investing , had landed on the Oracle of Omaha's recommended-reading list. Credentials established, Johnson, who is also the president of the American College of Financial Services in Bryn Mawr, gave us his outlook on which sectors of the economy might come out ahead under a President Trump, and which under a President Clinton.
NEWS
March 27, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"I've been dead four or five times. But I always came back. This time, I knew that some day, somehow, somebody would find me. " - Lonnie Johnson, in 1960 Lonnie Johnson is coming back once again. "Who's that?" a casual blues fan might ask. "You mean Robert Johnson?" Nope. I mean Lonnie Johnson. Robert Johnson is the iconic blues man who died in 1938 and is justifiably known as the King of the Delta Blues Singers. Lonnie Johnson is the guitarist and singer who was born in New Orleans and lived out the third act of his staggeringly long and stylistically varied career after moving to Philadelphia in the 1950s.
NEWS
October 13, 1989 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police yesterday arrested a man and woman they said were handing out street justice to a man caught breaking into a car. Police said the couple, Carnell Gray and Lavenda Garrison, held a pistol to Robert Johnson's head, marched him into a house, beat him with a baseball bat, poured boiling water on his genitals and fired the pistol near his head. Then they called the police. Johnson was admitted under guard to St. Agnes Medical Center's burn unit, where he was undergoing treatment yesterday for second-degree burns of the hands, back, face and genitals.
NEWS
November 9, 1995 | By Jada S. Gallagher, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Something's amiss in Chester. That's what Delaware County Judge Harry J. Bradley told two Chester men yesterday as he sentenced one to life imprisonment and the other to 4 1/2 to eight years in jail for the shooting death of a third Chester man in April. "Unfortunately, there are too many things like this in Chester," Bradley said. "I don't know what the answer to it is . . . We somehow have some magic to work in that city. " Bradley ordered Robert Johnson, 21, to serve a mandatory life term for shooting James Parissa Robinson three times outside an apartment in the 1200 block of West Ninth Street on April 10. Willie Glascoe, 26, got the lesser term on counts of aggravated assault and criminal conspiracy for beating Robinson moments before the shooting.
TRAVEL
May 18, 2015 | By Roberta Sandler, For The Inquirer
CLARKSDALE, Miss. - In the 1930s, a mediocre young guitar player stopped at a rural Mississippi crossroads at midnight to sell his soul to the devil. In return, Satan gifted him with wondrous skill. So goes the legend of the real-life Robert Johnson, seminal bluesman - "the master" in worshipper Eric Clapton's words. Today, Johnson's name beckons from roadside markers along a magical meander called the Mississippi Blues Trail. Wending through not only the Mississippi Delta and environs but down through the decades, back more than a century to the birth of the blues, the path was trod as well by Big Joe Williams, David "Honeyboy" Edwards, Muddy Waters, Charley Patton, Johnny Young, B.B. King, John Lee Hooker, Howlin' Wolf, and so many other icons-to-be looking for a way out of the dim-lit, whisky-soaked juke joints and the destitution of the Deep South.
NEWS
December 11, 1996 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Booker T. Johnson Sr., who combined wisdom and honesty to create a successful career in law enforcement, died Dec. 4. He was 71 and lived in the city's Cobbs Creek section. Johnson's service today was to include a police escort and a 21-gun salute, according to his daughter, Lillian Farmer. "My Dad was something special," she said. In his police career, Johnson provided special escorts to ex-President Gerald Ford during visits to Philadelphia and helped other dignitaries, said his daughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2004 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
As the title Robert Johnson: Trick the Devil indicates, the play at Freedom Theatre deals with the life and legend of the famous bluesman. It's easy to see why a writer would be interested in it: It is, literally, a devilishly good story. Johnson, goes the tale, wanted to play guitar, but was so inept with the first group he joined on the established blues circuit in Mississippi that people in the audience got angry. Frustrated, he dropped out of sight for a while (actually, he honed his skills playing and singing at obscure rural juke joints)
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BUSINESS
May 24, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Robert Johnson attended Warren Buffett's most recent Berkshire Hathaway shareholders meeting, and on the flight out to Nebraska he was pleasantly surprised to learn that the book he had authored, Strategic Value Investing , had landed on the Oracle of Omaha's recommended-reading list. Credentials established, Johnson, who is also the president of the American College of Financial Services in Bryn Mawr, gave us his outlook on which sectors of the economy might come out ahead under a President Trump, and which under a President Clinton.
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
A RIVER ROSE up from beneath 52nd Street in West Philly yesterday morning and rushed down in the dark toward Wyalusing Avenue, where it plunged into the basement of a dive bar, swamped both of Robert Johnson's rides to work, and came to rest at the front steps of Alma Cummings' rowhouse on Paxon Street. No one was killed or injured when the massive, 130-year-old water-transmission line burst on 52nd Street near Pennsgrove Street, but 8 to 10 million gallons can ruin a Sunday in a hundred different ways, and the ripples of inconveniences could already be felt after the waters receded, locals said.
TRAVEL
May 18, 2015 | By Roberta Sandler, For The Inquirer
CLARKSDALE, Miss. - In the 1930s, a mediocre young guitar player stopped at a rural Mississippi crossroads at midnight to sell his soul to the devil. In return, Satan gifted him with wondrous skill. So goes the legend of the real-life Robert Johnson, seminal bluesman - "the master" in worshipper Eric Clapton's words. Today, Johnson's name beckons from roadside markers along a magical meander called the Mississippi Blues Trail. Wending through not only the Mississippi Delta and environs but down through the decades, back more than a century to the birth of the blues, the path was trod as well by Big Joe Williams, David "Honeyboy" Edwards, Muddy Waters, Charley Patton, Johnny Young, B.B. King, John Lee Hooker, Howlin' Wolf, and so many other icons-to-be looking for a way out of the dim-lit, whisky-soaked juke joints and the destitution of the Deep South.
SPORTS
April 23, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
As fans of the Penn Relays witnessed last year, Oregon's Edward Cheserek is one of the finest runners in college track. But there's more to competing for the Ducks than just posting fast times. The Oregon men's team needed to pile up points in the 3,000 meters last month at the NCAA indoor track and field championships, the next-to-last event of the meet, because it did not qualify in the climactic 4x400 relay. So coach Robert Johnson asked Cheserek, a sophomore from St. Benedict's Prep in North Jersey, to run what would be his fourth distance race - including trials and final in the mile and the 1,600-meter leg on the distance medley relay - in two days.
NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Building on its ambitious goal to create a "culture of health" in America, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is adding coaches and competitions to help local communities take up the challenge. The additional support reflects the size of the task: getting schools, businesses, transportation agencies, and other institutions to take responsibility for their communities' health. Princeton, N.J.-based RWJF may be the nation's largest health philanthropy, but its power to change the culture rests mainly on whether it can persuade local leaders to play along.
NEWS
January 24, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Matthew Johnson, 81, a longtime Philadelphia School District teacher, a vocalist, and a student of the Negro spiritual, died Monday, Jan. 5, of Parkinson's disease at Woodmont Center in Spotsylvania County, Va. Dr. Johnson made Philadelphia his home in 1963 and remained there until moving to Virginia in 2012. For almost 30 years, he taught in five city high schools and at the college level, retiring in 1991. Born in Bowling Green, Va., he graduated from Union High School before serving in the Army.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is getting a makeover. It wants new health ideas to go viral. It wants partners in business and government, to magnify its impact. And it seeks game-changing ideas from inventors to improve doctor visits and reshape medicine into a "culture of health. " The nation's largest health philanthropy has long been focused on discrete health problems such as smoking and obesity. But in a major policy shift publicly discussed Wednesday for the first time, the Princeton-based foundation is seeking to up its game and inspire mass movements.
SPORTS
April 26, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Penn Relays once again will welcome some of the world's top women's sprinters on Saturday to the USA vs. the World events. But if you can't wait that long, you can see on Thursday the woman who has recorded the fastest time in the world this year at 100 meters. Her name is English Gardner, a junior at Oregon, who has been running at the Penn Relays since she was a teenager and competed for Eastern High School in South Jersey. She ran the fastest 100-meter time of 2013, 11.00 seconds, Saturday at the Mount San Antonio College Relays in California.
NEWS
March 27, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"I've been dead four or five times. But I always came back. This time, I knew that some day, somehow, somebody would find me. " - Lonnie Johnson, in 1960 Lonnie Johnson is coming back once again. "Who's that?" a casual blues fan might ask. "You mean Robert Johnson?" Nope. I mean Lonnie Johnson. Robert Johnson is the iconic blues man who died in 1938 and is justifiably known as the King of the Delta Blues Singers. Lonnie Johnson is the guitarist and singer who was born in New Orleans and lived out the third act of his staggeringly long and stylistically varied career after moving to Philadelphia in the 1950s.
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