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Robert Kennedy

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1997 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amid all the recent public flutter regarding the character of John F. Kennedy, amid all the talk about sex and secret marriages and Marilyn, amid all the charges about VD and drugs, the president's volatile, restless younger brother has gone virtually unmentioned. Like a stealth bomber, Robert F. Kennedy's reputation has negotiated all the flak thrown up around publication of reporter Seymour M. Hersh's The Dark Side of Camelot, even though the former Senate aide, campaign manager, attorney general, senator and presidential candidate is a central player in many of the unsavory dramas Hersh describes.
NEWS
May 18, 2012 | By Jim Fitzgerald, Associated Press
BEDFORD, N.Y. - Robert F. Kennedy Jr.'s estranged wife, Mary Richardson Kennedy, who had fought drug and alcohol problems, was found dead in her home Wednesday. Attorney Kerry Lawrence, who had represented her in a drunken-driving case, said he didn't know the cause of her death at age 52. An autopsy was set for Thursday. Police confirmed a body was found on Robert F. Kennedy Jr.'s property in Bedford, north of New York. The former Mary Richardson married Robert Kennedy Jr., a prominent environmental lawyer and the son of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy and nephew of President John F. Kennedy, in 1994.
NEWS
May 18, 2012 | Associated Press
BEDFORD, N.Y. - The Kennedy family, so practiced at public mourning, is grieving the death of the estranged wife of Robert Kennedy Jr., who hanged herself at her home north of New York City. Mary Richardson Kennedy, 52, an architect known for her philanthropic and environmental work, was found dead Wednesday on the family property in Bedford. The Westchester County Medical Examiner's Office said she died of asphyxiation due to hanging. A person familiar with the investigation said authorities had concluded the death was a suicide.
NEWS
May 3, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
President John F. Kennedy would have supported his defense secretary, Robert McNamara, to succeed him in order to keep Lyndon B. Johnson out of the White House, Robert Kennedy told interviewers. The disclosure is contained in "Robert Kennedy: In His Own Words," a book based on heretofore unpublished interviews Kennedy gave between 1964 and 1967. Excerpts appear in the current Newsweek magazine. The book is scheduled for release in June, marking the 20th anniversary of Robert Kennedy's assassination.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | By JAMES W. HILTY
Oliver Stone's JFK is a tantalizing motion picture. The movie feeds on America's insecurities by shamelessly milking the sentiment of the Kennedy mystique, indiscriminately blending fact and discredited conspiracy theories and generously employing one of Hollywood's recipes for box-office success: The single, dedicated heroic investigator tilting against establishment windmills. The key to the movie's lack of historical credibility rests on one crucial question asked in the movie and again recently by Sen. Arlen Specter (Commentary Page, Jan. 5)
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
James J. Florio was a 31-year-old lawyer who had just passed the bar exam when he went to see Sen. Robert F. Kennedy speak in Camden as part of his campaign for the 1968 Democratic presidential nomination. RFK spoke to a largely African American crowd of more than 10,000 people in the city's packed Convention Hall, since destroyed by fire. "He was serene, almost religious, in the way he talked about equity and social justice," the former Democratic governor said Wednesday, recalling the speech.
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | by Richard Sisk, New York Daily News
The generation of Camelot joined last night with the generation of a new and struggling president to draw strength from the legacy of Robert F. Kennedy and pledged to fulfill his dream that "we can make a difference. " On the 25th anniversary of Kennedy's death, President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton accompanied three generations of Kennedy's family, led by his widow, Ethel, to the simple white cross marking the grave site of the late junior senator from New York. There, in the solemn splendor of Arlington National Cemetery, among the tombstones of the bravest from all the nation's wars, they celebrated a candle-lit Mass of Courage and Reconciliation to Kennedy's memory and message.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - Robert F. Kennedy Jr. accused his estranged wife, Mary, of abusing his children from an earlier marriage, including stealing items from his young daughter, showing up uninvited on trips he took after they separated and sometimes calling him dozens of times a day, according to a legal filing revealed Sunday. Mary Kennedy killed herself last month at the family's estate in Bedford, N.Y. Robert Kennedy filed for divorce two years ago, and the case was pending when she died.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By David R. Boldt, Editor of the Editorial Page
My wife, my sister and I had been undecided early in the evening as to whether we would go to the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles on primary night, June 5, 1968. The early returns actually showed Eugene McCarthy leading, and it just would have been too sad to go to Robert Kennedy's election night headquarters if he was going to lose. My wife and sister had too much of a psychological investment at that point in the Kennedy campaign. There's a long story that leads up to that night, a story that tells a little about what times were like then, and how fast things can change.
SPORTS
August 9, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Joe DiMaggio died with Marilyn Monroe's name on his lips, according to the Hall of Famer's lawyer and confidant. "I'll finally get to see Marilyn," DiMaggio whispered, according to Morris Engelberg in an article in the September issue of Vanity Fair magazine. Engelberg was at the former Yankee's bedside when he died. Engelberg said DiMaggio never stopped loving Monroe even after their nine-month marriage in 1954 ended in divorce. In Engelberg's view, the actress may have been the only person DiMaggio really loved.
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NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
James J. Florio was a 31-year-old lawyer who had just passed the bar exam when he went to see Sen. Robert F. Kennedy speak in Camden as part of his campaign for the 1968 Democratic presidential nomination. RFK spoke to a largely African American crowd of more than 10,000 people in the city's packed Convention Hall, since destroyed by fire. "He was serene, almost religious, in the way he talked about equity and social justice," the former Democratic governor said Wednesday, recalling the speech.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Before New City Stage Company's return engagement of RFK begins, Ren Manley's collection of vintage black-and-white commercials and film clips, projected onto an onstage wall, sets the scene. There's an obituary reel for Marilyn Monroe - that favorite of Bobby's big brother Jack - as well as an ad touting the luxury of oil heat, and Don Knotts schooling the young Ron Howard about tough-guy behavior. When the lights dim, we hear the unmistakable muffled pop of a television's button turning off. There's no shortage of nostalgia-tripping in this production, with even more evocative assists by Procol Harum, Jefferson Airplane, and other bands from the era. The multimedia effects work both on boomers, who remember exactly where they were when they heard the terrible news, and on younger audiences living through their own era of dashed hopes and undeclared wars.
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | Reviewed by George Anastasia
Mafia Summit J. Edgar Hoover, the Kennedy Brothers, and the Meeting That Unmasked the Mob By Gil Reavill Thomas Dunne Books. 304 pp. $26.99   It is a quintessential event in the history of the American Mafia. On Nov. 14, 1957, dozens of mob figures, including some of the biggest bosses in the country, gathered in the home of Joseph Barbara in the tiny hamlet of Apalachin in Upstate New York. Barbara, a mob soldier, had stocked his country estate with loads of provisions, including 20 10-pound boxes of top-grade steaks and two 10-pound boxes of veal.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - Robert F. Kennedy Jr. accused his estranged wife, Mary, of abusing his children from an earlier marriage, including stealing items from his young daughter, showing up uninvited on trips he took after they separated and sometimes calling him dozens of times a day, according to a legal filing revealed Sunday. Mary Kennedy killed herself last month at the family's estate in Bedford, N.Y. Robert Kennedy filed for divorce two years ago, and the case was pending when she died.
NEWS
May 18, 2012 | By Jim Fitzgerald, Associated Press
BEDFORD, N.Y. - Robert F. Kennedy Jr.'s estranged wife, Mary Richardson Kennedy, who had fought drug and alcohol problems, was found dead in her home Wednesday. Attorney Kerry Lawrence, who had represented her in a drunken-driving case, said he didn't know the cause of her death at age 52. An autopsy was set for Thursday. Police confirmed a body was found on Robert F. Kennedy Jr.'s property in Bedford, north of New York. The former Mary Richardson married Robert Kennedy Jr., a prominent environmental lawyer and the son of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy and nephew of President John F. Kennedy, in 1994.
NEWS
May 18, 2012 | Associated Press
BEDFORD, N.Y. - The Kennedy family, so practiced at public mourning, is grieving the death of the estranged wife of Robert Kennedy Jr., who hanged herself at her home north of New York City. Mary Richardson Kennedy, 52, an architect known for her philanthropic and environmental work, was found dead Wednesday on the family property in Bedford. The Westchester County Medical Examiner's Office said she died of asphyxiation due to hanging. A person familiar with the investigation said authorities had concluded the death was a suicide.
NEWS
September 2, 2009 | By LARRY McMULLEN
I WATCHED TV news off and on from morning to night the day Ted Kennedy died, enough to hear summations of what were obviously thought to be the key events in an important life. The best public moment he ever had, one lovingly shown by every station on the day he died, was the eulogy he gave in New York's St. Patrick's Cathedral in 1968 for his assassinated brother, Robert Kennedy. I was in the cathedral a day earlier when average citizens lined up for blocks to pass by a closed coffin near the altar.
NEWS
February 6, 2007 | By Arthur Caplan
What must it be like to spend a huge amount of time every waking day trying to change public health practice - only to find out that you were wrong? That is precisely what has happened to the proponents of the theory that mercury in vaccines - contained in the preservative thimerosal, which once was used (and is used no longer) in vaccines - is responsible for a nearly 20-year explosion in autism and other neurological disorders among American children. This urban legend has had very real - and terrible - consequences.
NEWS
May 4, 2003 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
During a frenetic, 10-minute audience with Robert F. Kennedy in a New York hotel room a few weeks before his assassination, Louis S. Glanzman just wished the presidential candidate would leave the phone in its cradle. Glanzman needed a quiet moment to peer into Kennedy's shrouded, downturned eyes so that he could wrestle the man's strong-willed spirit onto a sheet of paper. An illustrator for Time magazine, Glanzman had to tune out the constant ringing, Kennedy's excited chatter, and the flurry of photographers going in and out of the room.
SPORTS
August 9, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Joe DiMaggio died with Marilyn Monroe's name on his lips, according to the Hall of Famer's lawyer and confidant. "I'll finally get to see Marilyn," DiMaggio whispered, according to Morris Engelberg in an article in the September issue of Vanity Fair magazine. Engelberg was at the former Yankee's bedside when he died. Engelberg said DiMaggio never stopped loving Monroe even after their nine-month marriage in 1954 ended in divorce. In Engelberg's view, the actress may have been the only person DiMaggio really loved.
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