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Robert Pinsky

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NEWS
April 9, 2004
Robert Pinsky is one of the nation's most prominent poets and public figures in the arts. During his unprecedented three-year term as U.S. Poet Laureate, he directed the nationwide Favorite Poem Project, in which ordinary, average people were videotaped reciting their favorite poems. The archive of readings is now in the Library of Congress. Pinsky is reading at 8 tonight in the Library Auditorium of Bucks County Community College, 275 Swamp Road, Newtown (215-968-8150). In an e-mail exchange with The Inquirer, Pinsky spoke of technology and poetry, the place of the poet in the community, and the connection between New Jersey and poetry.
LIVING
April 24, 2000 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert Pinsky was itching for an argument. When he took the job as the nation's poet laureate in 1997, the Long Branch, N.J., native and Boston University professor was well aware of the conventional wisdom: That poetry is little consequence to a Rikki Lake nation with a remote-control attention span. That it's the province of academics. That real people have better things to do. Contending that the opposite is true - that the verse of poets such as Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson and Amiri Baraka remains central to the nation's soul - Pinsky hatched the "Favorite Poem Project.
LIVING
April 8, 2001 | By Frank Wilson INQUIRER BOOK EDITOR
In April 1998, a year after the Library of Congress named him poet laureate, Robert Pinsky established the Favorite Poem Project. Over the next year, 18,000 people - ranging in age from 5 to 97 - wrote to submit their favorite poems. A collection of those poems, along with letters of submission, has been published and is now in its sixth printing. A set of 50 short documentary videos has been released, and a Web site devoted to Americans' favorite poems has been created, along with an expandable database of the letters of submission.
NEWS
September 18, 2002 | By Doug Otto
This weekend I will make my biennial pilgrimage to poetry heaven, otherwise known as the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival. This renowned gathering will be held for the ninth time at Waterloo Village in Stanhope. I plan to visit as many of the Chautauqua-style tents as possible, where present-day masters of the spoken word will be offering explorations in the poetic craft. Billy Collins, the U.S. poet laureate, will be there, as well as three previous poets laureate - Robert Pinsky, Rita Dove, and Stanley Kunitz.
NEWS
December 28, 2002
The New Jersey Legislature seems hell-bent on abolishing the post of state poet laureate only two years after it was created. This is overkill. It is a kneejerk reaction to controversy. Yet a bill to eliminate the post has sailed through committee and awaits full Senate action following the holiday recess. The lawmakers have reason to be upset with current poet laureate Amiri Baraka, whose controversial poem, "Somebody Blew Up America," included a reprehensible suggestion that Jews were responsible for the World Trade Center attack.
NEWS
August 6, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Pulitzer Prize winner Stanley Kunitz, 95, will become the 10th poet laureate of the United States in the fall, the Library of Congress announced last week. He published his first book of poetry in 1930 and has since produced nine more. He will succeed Robert Pinsky, who has held the post for three years. The new laureate said the appointment came as a great surprise and he accepted on the assurance that he would not need to move to Washington. "The reason I decided to accept this honor is that I want to do something for the young in this country," he said.
NEWS
October 7, 2002 | By Thomas Belton
Something exciting happened in New Jersey last month, and it had nothing to do with The Sopranos' new season, hazardous waste, or political corruption. After a two-year hiatus, poets by the hundreds returned to Waterloo Village in Morris County, like swallows to Capistrano, for the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival. There was an informal armistice, of sorts, in the rhetoric of the faraway Middle East conflict as Taha Muhammad Ali, a self-taught Muslim who writes in Arabic, read his poems of simple life in Nazareth, where he sells tiny statues to Christian pilgrims.
NEWS
November 16, 2005 | By Edward Hirsch
Tonight, the American Poetry Review, the most widely circulated poetry magazine in the world, will celebrate its 33d year of continuous publication at a gala event titled "Of the People, For the People: A Celebration of American Poetry. " It will take place, fittingly, at the National Constitution Center and feature Meryl Streep reading selections from Emily Dickinson. The audience will also hear the poets John Ashbery, Rita Dove, Jorie Graham, Robert Hass, Robert Pinsky, and I reading from our own work.
NEWS
April 8, 2003 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bryn Mawr College has an illustrious and long history - 118 years to be exact - as a sterling academic institution for serious, bright young women, historically bypassing such traditional areas of study as education and the arts. This was not the place for prancing girls in black leotards or those lost in the world of their journals, a perception that continues to this day when a third of its 1,330 undergraduate enrollment major in the sciences. But Bryn Mawr "wants to encourage a greater balance in life, and is raising its profile in the arts," says provost Ralph Kuncl.
LIVING
April 7, 1997 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Allen Ginsberg, the Beat Generation icon and tireless counterculture guru who died at 70 Saturday, led the most public of poetic lives. For four decades, Ginsberg maintained a hyperactive, agitating presence in American popular culture. The influence of the Paterson, N.J.-raised son of a schoolteacher-poet father and Russian-emigre Marxist mother went far beyond the realm of poetry and literature. His angry and profane poem "Howl" began a celebrated career as a constant advocate of free speech, and sexual and artistic liberation.
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NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
'Without my death, who will I be?" That central existential question in the futuristic Tod Machover opera Death and the Powers threatens to reverse the usual leading-soprano dilemma: Instead of preparing to die, she decides she should live, possibly forever, in an alternative realm. And since the medium is its message, this acclaimed 2011 opera about billionaire Simon Powers, who downloads his essence into his possessions, arrives in Philadelphia in the apotheosis of virtuality.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
He's as American as poets get - a son of immigrant parents, the hardworking classes, a master of straightforward, uncompromising American-English poetry telling of life as flesh-and-blood people live and feel it. And Wednesday, Philip Levine, 83, was appointed by Congress as U.S. poet laureate, succeeding the eminent W.S. Merwin. It's amazing Levine hasn't been laureate yet. He has won almost every high-profile prize for poetry, including a Pulitzer, two Guggenheims, two National Book Awards, and a Ruth Lilly Prize.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
O Philadelphia! My Philadelphia! Rise up and hear the bells! We are getting a poet laureate! Camden, home of Walt Whitman, will shame us no more. Mayor Nutter recently announced that Philadelphia - city of clamorous larynx and dexterous middle digits! - will establish through its Office of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy an official Poet Laureate program. Chief Cultural Officer Gary Steuer, who will chair the planning committee, "hopes the poet laureate can be announced sometime this fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2006 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
I saw the best minds of the PEN "World Voices" Literary Festival annoyed by overbooking, starving, hysterical, sometimes not remembering why they were there. . . . How to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Howl, the chantaholic 1956 poem by Allen Ginsberg that became a mantra of the Beat Generation, a countercultural update of Whitman's barbaric yawp, a "Mardi Gras of Freedom" (Robert Pinsky's apt phrase) for every outsider who ever felt a victim of large oppressive forces? How to mark a radical, prophetic scream against everything official and boring in poetry, a long-line, free-verse apotheosis of the experimental and uninhibited (drugs, homosexuality, friendship, you name it)
NEWS
November 16, 2005 | By Edward Hirsch
Tonight, the American Poetry Review, the most widely circulated poetry magazine in the world, will celebrate its 33d year of continuous publication at a gala event titled "Of the People, For the People: A Celebration of American Poetry. " It will take place, fittingly, at the National Constitution Center and feature Meryl Streep reading selections from Emily Dickinson. The audience will also hear the poets John Ashbery, Rita Dove, Jorie Graham, Robert Hass, Robert Pinsky, and I reading from our own work.
NEWS
April 9, 2004
Robert Pinsky is one of the nation's most prominent poets and public figures in the arts. During his unprecedented three-year term as U.S. Poet Laureate, he directed the nationwide Favorite Poem Project, in which ordinary, average people were videotaped reciting their favorite poems. The archive of readings is now in the Library of Congress. Pinsky is reading at 8 tonight in the Library Auditorium of Bucks County Community College, 275 Swamp Road, Newtown (215-968-8150). In an e-mail exchange with The Inquirer, Pinsky spoke of technology and poetry, the place of the poet in the community, and the connection between New Jersey and poetry.
NEWS
April 8, 2003 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bryn Mawr College has an illustrious and long history - 118 years to be exact - as a sterling academic institution for serious, bright young women, historically bypassing such traditional areas of study as education and the arts. This was not the place for prancing girls in black leotards or those lost in the world of their journals, a perception that continues to this day when a third of its 1,330 undergraduate enrollment major in the sciences. But Bryn Mawr "wants to encourage a greater balance in life, and is raising its profile in the arts," says provost Ralph Kuncl.
NEWS
December 28, 2002
The New Jersey Legislature seems hell-bent on abolishing the post of state poet laureate only two years after it was created. This is overkill. It is a kneejerk reaction to controversy. Yet a bill to eliminate the post has sailed through committee and awaits full Senate action following the holiday recess. The lawmakers have reason to be upset with current poet laureate Amiri Baraka, whose controversial poem, "Somebody Blew Up America," included a reprehensible suggestion that Jews were responsible for the World Trade Center attack.
NEWS
October 7, 2002 | By Thomas Belton
Something exciting happened in New Jersey last month, and it had nothing to do with The Sopranos' new season, hazardous waste, or political corruption. After a two-year hiatus, poets by the hundreds returned to Waterloo Village in Morris County, like swallows to Capistrano, for the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival. There was an informal armistice, of sorts, in the rhetoric of the faraway Middle East conflict as Taha Muhammad Ali, a self-taught Muslim who writes in Arabic, read his poems of simple life in Nazareth, where he sells tiny statues to Christian pilgrims.
NEWS
September 18, 2002 | By Doug Otto
This weekend I will make my biennial pilgrimage to poetry heaven, otherwise known as the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival. This renowned gathering will be held for the ninth time at Waterloo Village in Stanhope. I plan to visit as many of the Chautauqua-style tents as possible, where present-day masters of the spoken word will be offering explorations in the poetic craft. Billy Collins, the U.S. poet laureate, will be there, as well as three previous poets laureate - Robert Pinsky, Rita Dove, and Stanley Kunitz.
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