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Robert Rauschenberg

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April 9, 1999 | By Frazier Moore, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer TV columnist Gail Shister contributed to this report
As a young artist, he awoke one morning with an urge to paint but no money for a canvas. Solution: He appropriated his own pillow and quilt, caking them with paint, toothpaste and fingernail polish, then mounting this concoction on a frame. Bed set off fireworks in the art world. More than four decades later, Robert Rauschenberg remains a celebrated troublemaker and, at age 73, busier than ever. Too many ideas beckon, but he still can't say no. Despite his legendary status, he is not a household name on a par with Tom Cruise or even his chum Andy Warhol.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
A retrospective of Robert Rauschenberg's art is now on exhibit at the three Guggenheim museums in New York City. The first full career retrospective of his work to be organized in the United States since 1976, the show includes about 400 pieces. Rauschenberg, who was born in Texas in 1925, has explored concepts such as technology's application to the arts and combining disparate subjects.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1993 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Cage/Cunningham, Elliot Caplan's glorification of choreographer Merce Cunningham and the late composer John Cage - collaborators and companions for almost a half-century - essentially preaches to the choir. While Cage and Cunningham successfully embraced the principle of randomness to shape their respective compositions and dance works, it is a mistake to organize a documentary on this same principle, as Caplan has. One wouldn't know from Cage/Cunningham that these smiling masters painstakingly stripped their art to its purest elements.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1993 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philanthropists and art patrons Walter and Leonore Annenberg are among the 13 recipients of the 1993 National Medal of Arts, the White House announced yesterday. The 13 arts winners, along with five winners of the Charles Frankel Prize in Humanities, will be honored at special White House ceremonies Thursday. "These extraordinary individuals have made a gift to American cultural life that is beyond measure," President Clinton said in a statement yesterday. "Through these awards we celebrate their impressive achievements and extend our deepest thanks for efforts that nourish our creative and intellectual spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
I don't put much stock in performing-arts retrospectives. A gallery can hold decades of paintings; an evening of dance lets us peer back at just a handful. Such is the case with Trisha Brown Dance Company's "Proscenium Works, 1979-2011," which features three of Brown's creations from the 1980s to 2003. To Bryn Mawr College's credit, the dance performance is one of many events for In the New Body , a yearlong celebration of Brown's artistry that includes lectures, master classes, and performances culminating in June, when the Pennsylvania Ballet presents O zlozony/O composite , the first American ballet company to stage one of Brown's works.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1991 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Even if you don't plan to attend the Institute of Contemporary Art's grand opening this weekend, Phillips Simpkin has ensured that even passers-by will have a brush with the inaugural exhibition. One of 50 artists in the "Artists Choose Artists" show, Simkins has mounted one of his works outside the new $5.4 million, industrial-style museum. The work, "ICArt All Ways At Liberty," sprawls 130 feet along the building's Sansom Street side. "They rejected my first proposal, which was for the front of the building," Simpkin, 47, noted with amusement as two workmen installed the last of his brightly colored plywood letters.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
It's difficult to think of erstwhile enfant terrible Robert Rauschenberg as a senior citizen, but the calendar doesn't lie - he'll be 66 on Oct. 22. For more than 40 years, he has been a major presence - and in some ways a defining presence - in American art. One can't avoid Rauschenberg this year, because in terms of major museum exhibitions, he's on a roll. The parade of Rauschenberg shows began at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York in the winter and spring with a review of his seminal silkscreen paintings, made between 1962 and 1964.
NEWS
February 20, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
In 1983, when he was teaching at the University of Pennsylvania, noted art historian Leo Steinberg startled his fellow scholars by pointing out that Jesus Christ had a penis. Not only was the Savior genitally endowed like other men, Steinberg wrote, but in some paintings He and His mother proudly displayed this evidence of Jesus' human kinship. Don't be chagrined if you hadn't noticed. Steinberg's landmark book, The Sexuality of Christ in Renaissance Art and in Modern Oblivion, further observed that over five centuries, many representations of Jesus' genitals had been covered or painted out. Not surprisingly, the book generated considerable controversy, but not in religious quarters, Steinberg recalled: "It was the art historians mostly who were appalled.
NEWS
May 15, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
There's no denying Marian Locks' importance on the cultural front of the Philadelphia area. Her disarming, friend-of-the-artist directness as an art dealer came onto the scene in 1968 like a welcome breath of fresh air and, indeed, it is her gallery activity from the 1970s and '80s that makes the best claim for her significance. Doyenne of area art dealers, Locks - founder of the prestigious Locks Gallery on Philadelphia's Washington Square South - received Mayor Rendell's Arts and Culture Award for significant contributions to the visual arts on Wednesday.
NEWS
August 3, 2008 | By Steven Siegel
Art may be at its greatest when it is still simple and raw. Then we often glimpse greatness to come; then we often see the artist most clearly. Alexander Calder, the Philadelphia sculptor whose 110th birth anniversary is this year, is a case in point. Like many famous artists, he had all the technical and financial resources a sculptor could hope for, and he used them in the production of his large mobiles and stabiles. But he also sat at his bench, and over a lifetime produced a prodigious body of one-of-a-kind, hand-crafted jewelry, and countless other small works.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
I don't put much stock in performing-arts retrospectives. A gallery can hold decades of paintings; an evening of dance lets us peer back at just a handful. Such is the case with Trisha Brown Dance Company's "Proscenium Works, 1979-2011," which features three of Brown's creations from the 1980s to 2003. To Bryn Mawr College's credit, the dance performance is one of many events for In the New Body , a yearlong celebration of Brown's artistry that includes lectures, master classes, and performances culminating in June, when the Pennsylvania Ballet presents O zlozony/O composite , the first American ballet company to stage one of Brown's works.
NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
An exhibition like the current "Dancing Around the Bride" had to happen eventually at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which holds the largest and most important collection anywhere of art by Marcel Duchamp. Its premise is simple, and hardly a surprise encounter, given that its essential truth has been known for decades. Duchamp was one of the most influential artists of the last 100 years. Among those he influenced directly were two important visual artists, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg; a dancer and choreographer, Merce Cunningham; and a composer, John Cage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2010 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Art dealers - many now call themselves gallerists - rarely become legendary. A new biography of Leo Castelli by Annie Cohen-Solal reconstructs in loving detail the life and times of one who did. Castelli not only created an international market for American contemporary art, he became as integral to the art history of the last half of the last century as the artists he championed, especially Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg. The publication of Leo and His Circle intersects with a Philadelphia event honoring a beloved and respected local dealer who, in her own way, was largely responsible for instigating a fertile and exciting period in the local art community.
NEWS
August 3, 2008 | By Steven Siegel
Art may be at its greatest when it is still simple and raw. Then we often glimpse greatness to come; then we often see the artist most clearly. Alexander Calder, the Philadelphia sculptor whose 110th birth anniversary is this year, is a case in point. Like many famous artists, he had all the technical and financial resources a sculptor could hope for, and he used them in the production of his large mobiles and stabiles. But he also sat at his bench, and over a lifetime produced a prodigious body of one-of-a-kind, hand-crafted jewelry, and countless other small works.
NEWS
May 14, 2008 | By Edward J. Sozanski FOR THE INQUIRER
Robert Rauschenberg, who with contemporary Jasper Johns provoked a profound shift in 20th-century art after World War II, died Monday night at his home on Captiva Island, Fla. He was 82. According to his New York dealer, Arne Glimcher of PaceWildenstein gallery, the cause was heart failure. Beginning in the early to mid-1950s, Mr. Rauschenberg extended the vocabulary of painting, which had been more or less fixed since the Middle Ages, by combining pigment with real objects such as stuffed birds, fabrics and household appliances, and photographs reproduced from newspapers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2005 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Robert Rauschenberg will be 80 years old in October. I provide this information for those who might not realize that the man who drove a stake through the heart of abstract expressionism with his messy "combine" paintings is still alive. However, the Rauschenberg exhibition at the Locks Gallery isn't about now, it's about the late 1980s and early '90s, when the artist was making a series of large-scale, multiple-image works in hot wax screened onto sheets of stainless steel or metals such as copper and polished aluminum.
NEWS
February 20, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
In 1983, when he was teaching at the University of Pennsylvania, noted art historian Leo Steinberg startled his fellow scholars by pointing out that Jesus Christ had a penis. Not only was the Savior genitally endowed like other men, Steinberg wrote, but in some paintings He and His mother proudly displayed this evidence of Jesus' human kinship. Don't be chagrined if you hadn't noticed. Steinberg's landmark book, The Sexuality of Christ in Renaissance Art and in Modern Oblivion, further observed that over five centuries, many representations of Jesus' genitals had been covered or painted out. Not surprisingly, the book generated considerable controversy, but not in religious quarters, Steinberg recalled: "It was the art historians mostly who were appalled.
NEWS
May 15, 2000 | By Susan Balee
Born just before and just after World War I, respectively, John Cage and Merce Cunningham entered a culture intent on shaking off its ancestors. For modern artists and intellectuals, the 19th century lingered like a bad odor: It smelled of slavery, imperialism and unchecked industrialism. Technology prospered alongside industry, affecting the fine arts as well as the arts of war. For example, the invention of photography rendered realism in painting obsolete, while the harrowing array of sophisticated weaponry designed for World War I redefined battle even as it created new modes of death.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1999 | By Frazier Moore, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer TV columnist Gail Shister contributed to this report
As a young artist, he awoke one morning with an urge to paint but no money for a canvas. Solution: He appropriated his own pillow and quilt, caking them with paint, toothpaste and fingernail polish, then mounting this concoction on a frame. Bed set off fireworks in the art world. More than four decades later, Robert Rauschenberg remains a celebrated troublemaker and, at age 73, busier than ever. Too many ideas beckon, but he still can't say no. Despite his legendary status, he is not a household name on a par with Tom Cruise or even his chum Andy Warhol.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
A retrospective of Robert Rauschenberg's art is now on exhibit at the three Guggenheim museums in New York City. The first full career retrospective of his work to be organized in the United States since 1976, the show includes about 400 pieces. Rauschenberg, who was born in Texas in 1925, has explored concepts such as technology's application to the arts and combining disparate subjects.
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