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Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

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NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Building on its ambitious goal to create a "culture of health" in America, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is adding coaches and competitions to help local communities take up the challenge. The additional support reflects the size of the task: getting schools, businesses, transportation agencies, and other institutions to take responsibility for their communities' health. Princeton, N.J.-based RWJF may be the nation's largest health philanthropy, but its power to change the culture rests mainly on whether it can persuade local leaders to play along.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is getting a makeover. It wants new health ideas to go viral. It wants partners in business and government to magnify its impact. And it seeks game-changing ideas from inventors to improve doctor visits and reshape medicine into a "Culture of Health. " The nation's largest health philanthrophy has long been focused on discreet health problems such as smoking and obesity. But in a major policy shift publicly discussed Wednesday for the first time, the Princeton-based foundation is seeking to up its game and inspire mass movements.
NEWS
July 29, 1996 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When June's cancer returned for the second time, in the early summer of 1994, she shuddered at the thought of her first cancer operation, and the long, painful year it took to recover. She also thought of her sister, who suffered through chemotherapy before dying in 1989. So she decided to proceed differently this time. She would forgo the operation and let nature take its course. She would not focus on her cancer as it spread from her colon to her liver, causing her belly to swell.
NEWS
June 27, 2014
A story Thursday on the new grant-making criteria for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation contained incorrect totals for its grants. The foundation gives away about $400 million a year. Active multiyear grants total about $108 million in New Jersey and $76 million in Pennsylvania, including $63 million in Philadelphia. The incorrect information was supplied by the foundation.
NEWS
December 4, 1995
For the last year now, state Rep. Sam Rohrer, a Berks County Republican, has been investigating the state's ACCESS program, which enables school districts to be reimbursed through Medicaid for services to special-education and emotionally troubled students. Some schools run the program through on-site health clinics; some of those are funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. How these facts became a conspiracy is anyone's guess. But sure enough, during a hearing in Harrisburg last Tuesday, a health-care attorney told Mr. Rohrer's panel that the ACCESS program and the health clinics are really part of a covert scheme to create a national health-care system, paid for by the Princeton-based Johnson foundation.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Delaware County will receive a $100,000 planning grant to develop a better system of delivering mental health care for children, county officials said this week. State Welfare Secretary John F. White Jr. is scheduled to visit the County Government Center in Media tomorrow to announce the grant. A news conference will be held at 1:30 p.m. in the County Council chambers. County Council Vice Chairman Mary Ann Arty said the money would be funneled through the state Department of Welfare from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a philanthropic organization in Princeton dedicated to advancing health care across the nation.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University will receive a $12.5 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to help cover the cost of integration into the school of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Rutgers announced Thursday. The cost, estimated most recently at $76 million over the next three years, will be borne by Rutgers under the proposed state budget for next year. President Robert L. Barchi has said a the lack of funding would mean delaying maintenance and the start of some programs, though he did not offer specifics.
NEWS
August 7, 2006 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Independence Blue Cross, the region's largest health insurer, is joining with 19 other Blue plans across the nation to form a massive database of health-care records that could enable employers, consumers and medical professionals to learn better what kind of care works best. The effort could also help the participating Blue plans compete against UnitedHealthcare Group, Aetna Inc. and other giant commercial insurers, who are also giving consumers more detailed performance data on their doctors and hospitals.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2002 | By Patricia Horn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, a Philadelphia doctor who specializes in geriatrics and makes house calls, will become president and chief executive officer of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the nation's largest health philanthropy. Prior to joining the foundation last year as senior vice president and director of its health-care group, Lavizzo-Mourey worked at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. The foundation, based in Princeton, funds projects to improve Americans' access to basic health care; promote healthy lifestyles; and reduce the use of tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs.
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
Is there a basic level of health care to which all Americans should be entitled? If so, who will pay for it? How will it be paid? A three-member panel of health-care experts addressed those questions at a forum last week but failed to reach consensus on the answers. The League of Women Voters of Bucks County organized the health-care forum. The meeting at Pennswood Village in Newtown Township was the second in a local series of meetings on the nation's health-care system prompted by the national league.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Building on its ambitious goal to create a "culture of health" in America, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is adding coaches and competitions to help local communities take up the challenge. The additional support reflects the size of the task: getting schools, businesses, transportation agencies, and other institutions to take responsibility for their communities' health. Princeton, N.J.-based RWJF may be the nation's largest health philanthropy, but its power to change the culture rests mainly on whether it can persuade local leaders to play along.
NEWS
September 6, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was plenty of bad news and a little good news in the latest report on America's weight problem. In their annual look at the state of obesity in America, two major foundations concluded Thursday that obesity was stabilizing in the U.S. but that we're still way too fat. There are still troubling racial and economic disparities when it comes to obesity, a risk factor for serious, expensive health problems. Baby boomers are the fattest generation. Children seem to be doing better.
NEWS
June 27, 2014
A story Thursday on the new grant-making criteria for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation contained incorrect totals for its grants. The foundation gives away about $400 million a year. Active multiyear grants total about $108 million in New Jersey and $76 million in Pennsylvania, including $63 million in Philadelphia. The incorrect information was supplied by the foundation.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is getting a makeover. It wants new health ideas to go viral. It wants partners in business and government, to magnify its impact. And it seeks game-changing ideas from inventors to improve doctor visits and reshape medicine into a "culture of health. " The nation's largest health philanthropy has long been focused on discrete health problems such as smoking and obesity. But in a major policy shift publicly discussed Wednesday for the first time, the Princeton-based foundation is seeking to up its game and inspire mass movements.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
TODAY, THE CITY will unveil a new anti-poverty strategy, and since ours is one of the poorest big cities in the nation, it's not a moment too soon. Poverty is a complicated problem, but recent headway that the city has made on childhood obesity may provide optimism for our ability to grapple with this seemingly intractable problem. Like poverty, childhood obesity is complex: driven by poverty, policy and other cultural and social factors, all of which has, in the past 30 years, doubled the rate of obesity in children and tripled it in adolescents.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University will receive a $12.5 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to help cover the cost of integration into the school of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Rutgers announced Thursday. The cost, estimated most recently at $76 million over the next three years, will be borne by Rutgers under the proposed state budget for next year. President Robert L. Barchi has said a the lack of funding would mean delaying maintenance and the start of some programs, though he did not offer specifics.
NEWS
October 27, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the leader of the nation's largest health philanthrophy looks at the world today, she sees great opportunity and growing challenge. Scientists have more data and can better measure the quality of health treatments, notes Risa Lavizzo-Mourey. But "some of the things we used to look at as gaps" - income disparity and political polarization - "are now more like chasms. " And then there's money. "We are much more cognizant of health-care spending than we've ever been in the time I've been in this," said Lavizzo-Mourey, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which is based in Princeton.
NEWS
February 18, 2010 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
To be healthy, it helps to be wealthy - or at least not poor. That was brought home in stark fashion yesterday by a new report that ranks Chester County residents the healthiest in Pennsylvania, and Philadelphians the least healthy. Camden County came out near the bottom in New Jersey. The findings were not a surprise to health-policy experts, who say factors such as obesity, education, and exposure to crime and pollution - all related to poverty - are at least as important as good medical care for maintaining health.
NEWS
March 6, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Terrance Keenan, 85, of Newtown, Bucks County, who as an executive and consultant with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in Princeton distributed more than 900 grants to health-care institutions and providers, died of heart failure Feb. 25 at Manor Care in Yardley. "Terry Keenan set the standard for creativity, caring, and vision in philanthropy. He never lost sight of the people he was trying to help," foundation president Risa Lavizzo-Mourey said. In 1972, Mr. Keenan became vice president of the foundation, which had recently received a $1 billion bequest from Robert Wood Johnson, then chief executive officer of Johnson & Johnson.
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