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Robin Givens

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1986 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Even though his hair is gray, and he's developed a double-chin, Buffalo Bob Smith, host of the "Howdy Doody Show," still looks pretty much the same as he did when he opened each show with the question: "Say kids, what time is it?" The answer, of course, was "It's Howdy Doody Time. " The show went off the air in 1960, but plans are underway to bring back Buffalo Bob and his puppet pals for a two-hour special, "Howdy Doody's 40th Birthday Celebration," in the fall. "Oh, I can't wait," said Smith in an interview with the New York Daily News.
NEWS
September 9, 1988 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Naive, gifted and tortured boxer meets beautiful, sophisticated and conniving woman, which adds up to a relationship more explosive than anything that might occur in the ring. If it sounds like a hit play and movie, that's because it was one: Clifford Odets' Golden Boy. If it sounds like real life, well, that's because the saga of heavyweight champion Mike Tyson and sitcom actress Robin Givens makes the Odets classic seem like a cartoon by comparison. Now haunted by the New York Daily News report that Tyson tried to commit suicide Sunday by driving Givens' BMW into a tree, and that he repeatedly beat and threatened his wife, the marriage appears to have gone from bad to toxic.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
One of the mysteries of celebrity is that larger-than-life figures are invariably doll-size when you meet them. Take Robin Givens (did someone say please?), that 5-foot-5, 105-pound star of TV and tabloids, whose sultry turn in the action-comedy A Rage in Harlem promises to be equally prominent on the big screen. Her role as the teasing sexpot Imabelle, which arrives in theaters today, brings to mind such film femmes fatales as Lauren Bacall in To Have and Have Not and Kathleen Turner in Body Heat.
SPORTS
June 19, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Heavyweight boxing champion Mike Tyson is portrayed in a Newsday report as a person who has struck his wife and raised fears among her family about their marriage. In today's editions, Newsday reported that Stephanie Givens, sister of Tyson's wife, Robin Givens, contended that Tyson has emotionally and physically abused his wife, and that the stress of the rocky relationship caused Robin to have a miscarriage last week in Atlantic City. "I've felt it's all been a big mistake from the beginning," Stephanie Givens told Newsday from Madeira, Portugal, where she was playing in a tennis tournament.
SPORTS
May 1, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Heavyweight boxer Mike Tyson has married Monica Turner, his longtime girlfriend, the Washington Post reported yesterday. The newspaper said it learned from unidentified sources it described as "close to the couple" that Tyson and Turner were married in a small, private ceremony at her Bethesda, Md., home several days ago. It said Tyson's co-manager, Rory Holloway, and his Muslim mentor, Muhammed Siddeeq, refused to comment. The newspaper reported that Siddeeq performed the ceremony.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1989 | By Marilyn Beck, Special to the Daily News
Robin Givens is in Vancouver starring in ABC's "Penthouse" movie and, she said, plowing through a pile of offers for other projects. Now that the dust is settling, it's possible to wonder if her marriage to, battles with and divorce from Mike Tyson have benefited her career. "Certainly all that's happened has raised my recognition factor," acknowledged the 24-year-old star of "Head of the Class. " "This is the first time I've had a choice of projects. I sit at my desk and say, 'Maybe I should accept this script, maybe I should accept that script.
NEWS
October 17, 1988 | By Lee Winfrey, Inquirer TV Writer
If heavyweight boxing champion Mike Tyson needs a character witness to testify in his divorce suit against Robin Givens, his wife for the last eight months, perhaps he should call Holly Robinson to the stand. Givens and Robinson are college classmates who have become successful television actresses, but don't expect a sweet reunion if you ever see them together again. They're as far away from sisterhood as Tyson is from poverty. Givens, 23, will begin her third season in the role of Darlene Merriman on Head of the Class at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday on ABC (Channel 6)
NEWS
September 11, 1988 | By Bill Lyon, Inquirer Sports Columnist
As actress Robin Givens recalls it, she was in Washington to deliver an anti-smoking speech when she got a phone call. She was informed that the heavyweight champion of the world would very much like an introduction. Object: romance. "Oh my God, Mike Tyson!" is how she remembered her squealing reaction. There was, she confessed, more revulsion than romance. Initially, at least. The Beauty and The Beast? "Well, you know," she said. "A fighter. I mean, it seemed grotesque.
SPORTS
June 20, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
Heavyweight boxing champion Mike Tyson's in-laws and his actress wife, Robin Givens, have launched a broadside that might be as tough a challenge as next Monday's title fight against Michael Spinks. In interviews published yesterday, Tyson's sister-in-law accuses him of hitting his wife, his mother-in-law says her family has been unfairly portrayed as greedy and his manager is said to be wishing Tyson would get a divorce. "They had a fight, and he hit Robin in the head, with a closed fist," Givens's sister, Stephanie, was quoted as saying in an interview with Newsday.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1988 | By Nancy Hass, Daily News Staff Writer
There's a new babe in advertising land these days - and you can find him nearly naked in your own living room every day. Instead of the curvaceous blonde bombshell once used to sell everything from cars to caviar, men - particularly the young, muscular and vapid variety - are the TV bimbos of the '80s. From the Drano spot in which a hunky model frolics in the tub to strains of "Splish-Splash," to a Fab detergent ad that features a tanned pin-up doing a reverse strip-tease, the advertising community appears to have put a new twist on the old "sex sells" adage.
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NEWS
May 5, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
In the ring, Mike Tyson obliterated opponents in the blink of an eye. The thunder-and-lightning pugilist once set a Junior Olympic record by knocking out an opponent in 8 seconds, and at 20 he was the youngest heavyweight champion in history. On stage at the Academy of Music on Thursday night, the 46-year-old Tyson had a daunting task before him that required more endurance than power and speed. In his one-man show, "Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth," the ex-champ was charged with entertaining an opera house crowd full of fight fans for nearly two hours, with only his life story to propel him. So how'd he do?
SPORTS
June 1, 2012 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
MIKE TYSON and I go back 22 years, back to spending endless hours in his Tokyo hotel room shooting the breeze when he wasn't on the phone to Robin Givens, his estranged wife, back home. I worked for The National Sports Daily back then, and in a few days, he was going to be our first huge story, the photo of him on his knees grappling for his fallen mouthpiece through swelled eyes, an image no one but James "Buster" Douglas imagined or anticipated. Those days in the hotel room before that fight were my first glimpse into how he thought, how troubled and confused he was, which is one reason Wednesday's 50-minute phone conversation will go down as one of the best days I've had in the business - better even than that Tokyo Sunday afternoon when his topple from "Baddest Man on the Planet" rocked the world and sent our just-forged friendship right into Don King's toilet.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2011 | By CHUCK DARROW, darrowc@phillynews.com 215-313-3134
Having spent more than 25 years on the celebrity-gossip beat, Barry Levine arguably has better war stories than any reporter who hasn't been embedded with armed forces overseas. Levine's (mis)adventures range from getting hit in the leg with buckshot while in a helicopter hovering above the Don Johnson-Melanie Griffith wedding, to spending a bizarre Halloween with singer Liza Minnelli and then-husband David Gest at their posh Manhattan home. But nothing comes close to topping the time he was physically threatened by none other than former heavyweight boxing champ Mike Tyson.
NEWS
May 12, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
James Toback, filmmaker, and Mike Tyson, fighter, met on the set of Toback's The Pick-up Artist back in the mid-1980s. The shoot was at the American Museum of Natural History, in New York. And by the wee hours, after cast and crew had long gone, Toback, a Harvard grad steeped in philosophy, was talking Heidegger and Kierkegaard, dread and nothingness, with Tyson. And Tyson, a gangbanger from Brooklyn who had done time in juvenile jail and would become the youngest world heavyweight champion by year's end, was listening, asking questions, fully engaged.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Soft-spoken, contemplative, weepy, the subject of James Toback's documentary Tyson - Mike Tyson, former heavyweight champion of the world - is not the ferocious, ear-biting, head-butting convicted rapist ("falsely accused," he insists) that the media have painted him to be. Well, he could be all that, too. A hugely engrossing documentary portrait - albeit one with an unreliable narrator sitting for the portrait - Tyson is an American Dream story with a decidedly bittersweet middle (and final?
SPORTS
October 22, 1999 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Once, he was his sport's Michael Jordan. Now, two-time former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson is more like boxing's Dennis Rodman. Rodman brought attention to himself by cross-dressing, dying his hair outrageous colors, dating Madonna and tattooing every visible part of his body. But that meant something only as long as he had his platform, and that platform was the Jordan-led Chicago Bulls' dynasty and all the rebounds Rodman provided for it. Take away his platform and Rodman, now out of the NBA, is reduced to nothing more than an oddity; his antics have ceased to matter much to a public that has stopped paying attention.
SPORTS
May 1, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Heavyweight boxer Mike Tyson has married Monica Turner, his longtime girlfriend, the Washington Post reported yesterday. The newspaper said it learned from unidentified sources it described as "close to the couple" that Tyson and Turner were married in a small, private ceremony at her Bethesda, Md., home several days ago. It said Tyson's co-manager, Rory Holloway, and his Muslim mentor, Muhammed Siddeeq, refused to comment. The newspaper reported that Siddeeq performed the ceremony.
SPORTS
October 1, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Mike Tyson was ordered yesterday by a federal jury in Albany, N.Y., to pay Kevin Rooney, his former trainer, more than $4.4 million. His supporters criticized the verdict as racially motivated. Rooney, who is white, had sued Tyson for $49 million, claiming the boxer had broken a lifetime contract by firing him in 1988. Tyson promised he would appeal what he called a "peculiar" and "unjust" verdict. But he would not comment specifically when asked if he thought the decision was racially motivated.
SPORTS
May 4, 1995 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The New York Islanders yesterday fired head coach Lorne Henning after his first season behind the bench of the National Hockey League team. Under Henning the Islanders finished last in the seven-team Atlantic Division, failing to make the playoffs with a 15-28-5 record. Henning played for the Islanders during their first nine seasons in the league. The Islanders have not named a successor. The Jets are gone from Winnipeg, but where and when remains unclear. A last attempt to sell the financially ailing team to a local group failed, meaning Canada will lose one of its eight NHL teams.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1995 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
The checkered career and complex character of boxer Mike Tyson are dramatically illustrated and fairly examined in Tyson, a pay-cable telemovie showing this weekend. Little-known Michael Jai White plays the title role adequately in Tyson, which airs at 8 p.m. Saturday on Home Box Office. White, who holds black belts in five styles of karate, has the physique, strength and agility to portray the powerful fighter convincingly. George C. Scott is properly crusty as Cus D'Amato, Tyson's first manager, and Paul Winfield is hilariously flamboyant as Don King, Tyson's current promoter.
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