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Robyn Hitchcock

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Robyn Hitchcock, who will appear at Haverford College tomorrow night, is one of the most original and underrated of all current rock-music creators. This English songwriter, guitarist and singer has spent the first half of the 1980s creating literate, funny and occasionally scary visions of modern life. Singing in a scratchy murmur, Hitchcock has led two bands, the Soft Boys and the Egyptians. For both of them, he has written songs that combine rough- edged rock with verbal inventiveness.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Not to worry, dear reader: There are no creepy, crawly, disgusting creatures oozing across the screen in Robyn Hitchcock: Sex, Food, Death . . . And Insects, the one-hour documentary film being shown on the Sundance Channel at 10 p.m. on Tuesday. The dark and disturbing stuff that goes on is all inside the head - and the songs - of Hitchcock, the British singer and guitarist who plays the World Caf? Live on Monday with his band the Venus 3, which includes Peter Buck (of R.E.M.
NEWS
November 17, 1986 | By Robert Gordon, Special to The Inquirer
Robyn Hitchcock sang of fish and death on Saturday night at Haverford College. Hitchcock, England's quirkiest songwriter, and his band, the Egyptians, were promoting the release of his staggering third album in a year, Elements of Light (Relativity). He relishes singing of peculiar twists in everyday situations, equating the morbid and the mundane. Too often, however, he merely shocks rather than enlightens, as when he sings "Sometimes I wish I was a pretty girl so I could rape myself in the shower.
NEWS
November 21, 2008 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
Trust perennial eccentric Robyn Hitchcock to put a twist on the complete-album craze. As CD sales have plummeted, more and more artists have taken to staging live-action listening parties for their fans, performing a classic (read: old) record in its entirety and replacing the vagaries of live performance with a guaranteed set list. Even the most vibrant of acts can't escape a sense that they've turned into their own tribute bands. Hitchcock's show Wednesday at World Cafe Live was billed as a re-creation of his 1984 album I Often Dream of Trains, but deviations from the record began before the first note was played.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Robyn Hitchcock may just be the last of the great English eccentrics. Like Kevin Ayers, Roy Harper, Robert Wyatt, and his hero, Pink Floyd fire-starter Syd Barrett, Hitchcock has forever crafted a sound - alone or with his first notable ensemble, the Soft Boys - whimsically and surrealistically literate with melodies steeped in folk traditionalism, psychedelia, and art-pop. His lyrics, sung in a gloriously nasal English accent reminiscent of a young Lennon or Bowie, express pent-up ire, frustration, mirth, and joy, while dazzling the listener/reader with their bold, odd intelligence and black humor.
NEWS
December 1, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
When Robyn Hitchcock was a boy, he wanted to be a mad scientist. "The only problem was I was never very good at math," says the 51-year-old singer, sitting at a Philadelphia restaurant. "Then I heard Dylan, and my soul was magnetized by music. And I wanted to be a cult figure, a curly-haired Jewish boy from Minnesota with sunglasses. " That didn't work out either, recalls Hitchcock, whose lovely, unsettling and perfectly titled new album, Spooked (Yep Roc), was recorded last winter with American roots musicians David Rawlings and Gillian Welch.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
RAY DAVIES got the whole "music and conversation" show-concept going a few years back, spinning a night of tunes and tales off his "X-Ray" autobiography and deep catalog of Kinks Klassics. In the next few weeks, Philadelphians will be privy to several more of such mixed-media concert treats. Rodney Crowell has a songs-and-stories showcase - tied to his artfully spun new hard-luck-life autobiography, "Chinaberry Sidewalks" - coming next Friday to the Sellersville Theatre. Peter Asher will regale us with tales and tunes (as half of Peter and Gordon, and as hit producer for the likes of Linda Ronstadt and James Taylor)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1992 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"People are really looking for the idiosyncrasies now," Robyn Hitchcock says uneasily, sounding more than a little trapped. A singer/songwriter with a weakness for classic '60s pop and an image that's kept him perpetually on the fringe of the music business, Hitchcock has acquired a reputation for unusual themes and free-associative situations in songs that don't always offer conventional narrative. With the current Perspex Island (A&M), he's tried to change that, to subordinate the science-fiction oddities to the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the surface, Billy Bragg and Robyn Hitchcock, who will share billing tomorrow night at the Keswick Theater, appear to be cut from the same cloth. Both are British singer-songwriters with longtime cult followings. Each is reappearing after a lengthy absence, and both are blessed with a gift of gab that often makes the spoken interludes the highlight of their concerts. But Bragg, whose new William Bloke (Elektra) is his first album in five years, and Hitchcock, whose Moss Elixir (Warner Bros.
NEWS
October 26, 1990 | By Sam Wood, Special to The Inquirer
Shortly after spinning a surrealistic tale of avenging turnips, Robyn Hitchcock mused: "I'm not being metaphysical. I'm not being literal either. Doesn't leave much margin, does it?" But within that margin Hitchcock created a vivid universe of inspired lunacy Wednesday night. Before a sold-out house at the Theater of Living Arts, Hitchcock put his weird and whimsical songs to that tunesmith's acid test, the solo performance. Touring without his backing band, the Egyptians, he accompanied himself on acoustic guitar for a stripped-down 90-minute survey of his last three albums.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Robyn Hitchcock may just be the last of the great English eccentrics. Like Kevin Ayers, Roy Harper, Robert Wyatt, and his hero, Pink Floyd fire-starter Syd Barrett, Hitchcock has forever crafted a sound - alone or with his first notable ensemble, the Soft Boys - whimsically and surrealistically literate with melodies steeped in folk traditionalism, psychedelia, and art-pop. His lyrics, sung in a gloriously nasal English accent reminiscent of a young Lennon or Bowie, express pent-up ire, frustration, mirth, and joy, while dazzling the listener/reader with their bold, odd intelligence and black humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
RAY DAVIES got the whole "music and conversation" show-concept going a few years back, spinning a night of tunes and tales off his "X-Ray" autobiography and deep catalog of Kinks Klassics. In the next few weeks, Philadelphians will be privy to several more of such mixed-media concert treats. Rodney Crowell has a songs-and-stories showcase - tied to his artfully spun new hard-luck-life autobiography, "Chinaberry Sidewalks" - coming next Friday to the Sellersville Theatre. Peter Asher will regale us with tales and tunes (as half of Peter and Gordon, and as hit producer for the likes of Linda Ronstadt and James Taylor)
NEWS
November 21, 2008 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
Trust perennial eccentric Robyn Hitchcock to put a twist on the complete-album craze. As CD sales have plummeted, more and more artists have taken to staging live-action listening parties for their fans, performing a classic (read: old) record in its entirety and replacing the vagaries of live performance with a guaranteed set list. Even the most vibrant of acts can't escape a sense that they've turned into their own tribute bands. Hitchcock's show Wednesday at World Cafe Live was billed as a re-creation of his 1984 album I Often Dream of Trains, but deviations from the record began before the first note was played.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Not to worry, dear reader: There are no creepy, crawly, disgusting creatures oozing across the screen in Robyn Hitchcock: Sex, Food, Death . . . And Insects, the one-hour documentary film being shown on the Sundance Channel at 10 p.m. on Tuesday. The dark and disturbing stuff that goes on is all inside the head - and the songs - of Hitchcock, the British singer and guitarist who plays the World Caf? Live on Monday with his band the Venus 3, which includes Peter Buck (of R.E.M.
NEWS
December 1, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
When Robyn Hitchcock was a boy, he wanted to be a mad scientist. "The only problem was I was never very good at math," says the 51-year-old singer, sitting at a Philadelphia restaurant. "Then I heard Dylan, and my soul was magnetized by music. And I wanted to be a cult figure, a curly-haired Jewish boy from Minnesota with sunglasses. " That didn't work out either, recalls Hitchcock, whose lovely, unsettling and perfectly titled new album, Spooked (Yep Roc), was recorded last winter with American roots musicians David Rawlings and Gillian Welch.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2000 | By Tom Moon, FOR THE INQUIRER
Regardless of current economic indications, it's a mean season in the record industry. Artists with cult followings and singer-songwriters with less-than-mega prospects have been turned loose by major labels, victims of 'N Sync syndrome - if you're not going to eventually pay off in a big way, the labels are saying, we're not interested. The deletion of these artists can be read as a signal that one of the industry's most basic tenets - the notion of developing careers, not just single hits - is vanishing rapidly.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the surface, Billy Bragg and Robyn Hitchcock, who will share billing tomorrow night at the Keswick Theater, appear to be cut from the same cloth. Both are British singer-songwriters with longtime cult followings. Each is reappearing after a lengthy absence, and both are blessed with a gift of gab that often makes the spoken interludes the highlight of their concerts. But Bragg, whose new William Bloke (Elektra) is his first album in five years, and Hitchcock, whose Moss Elixir (Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1992 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"People are really looking for the idiosyncrasies now," Robyn Hitchcock says uneasily, sounding more than a little trapped. A singer/songwriter with a weakness for classic '60s pop and an image that's kept him perpetually on the fringe of the music business, Hitchcock has acquired a reputation for unusual themes and free-associative situations in songs that don't always offer conventional narrative. With the current Perspex Island (A&M), he's tried to change that, to subordinate the science-fiction oddities to the music.
NEWS
October 26, 1990 | By Sam Wood, Special to The Inquirer
Shortly after spinning a surrealistic tale of avenging turnips, Robyn Hitchcock mused: "I'm not being metaphysical. I'm not being literal either. Doesn't leave much margin, does it?" But within that margin Hitchcock created a vivid universe of inspired lunacy Wednesday night. Before a sold-out house at the Theater of Living Arts, Hitchcock put his weird and whimsical songs to that tunesmith's acid test, the solo performance. Touring without his backing band, the Egyptians, he accompanied himself on acoustic guitar for a stripped-down 90-minute survey of his last three albums.
NEWS
April 6, 1988 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
Robyn Hitchcock is the kind of edgy, bookish rocker celebrated by collegiate fans and rock critics. There is good reason for Hitchcock's good reviews: He adorns dense pop-rock melodies with words that are rich with irony. At the Chestnut Cabaret on Monday, however, Hitchcock and his band, the Egyptians, showed how such talents can occasionally prove to be too much of a good thing. "My grandmother said to me, 'You always love the one you hate,' " said Hitchcock, in introducing a song called Devil Mask.
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