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January 25, 1986 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Ham hocks and chitlins and rock-and-roll at the Waldorf!" marveled record producer Quincy Jones, standing at the podium at the inaugural Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ceremony Thursday night. Well, not exactly ham hocks and chitlins - more like nouvelle-style smoked river trout, fruit sorbet and vintage California wines - but there was rock- and-roll in the Grand Ballroom of the swank Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, and plenty of it. And the spirit of rock's early days, which Jones alluded to, also pervaded the hall.
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | By B.G. Kelley
The Bandstand studio at 46th and Market Streets was old, dreary, and dark — that is, until Dick Clark appeared. Then the lights punched on like a bolt of sunshine, and the gym-like bleacher seats were rolled out with businesslike authority. A certain buzz circulated among the teenagers: Bandstand was about to begin. I went to the studio several times and, on one occasion, took part in one of Clark's famous spotlight dances with a girl I didn't even know. I was able to waltz past the guards at the entrance because I knew one of the regulars.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Little Richard's current show is designed for people who don't like to invest much energy in their entertainment. The self-described "architect of rock and roll," who appeared Sunday at Valley Forge Music Fair, offered a one hour made-for-TV rock-and-roll anthology that was disquietingly pleasant, full of audience sing-alongs, clap- alongs and on-stage dance-alongs, and utterly devoid of the willful outrageousness that is his trademark....
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
The slanting rays of the early-afternoon sun are lighting up the back room of Ray's Happy Birthday Bar in South Philadelphia, and already Low Cut Connie is rocking out. It's well before any normal hour to take the stage for the four-piece rock-and-roll combo, fronted by Cherry Hill native Adam Weiner, a piano-pumping showman; and Birmingham, England, drummer and guitarist Dan Finnemore. Joined by Neil Duncan and Ian Vos, the quartet will play Friday at Johnny Brenda's in support of their stellar, self-released second album, Call Me Sylvia . But today, at a neighborhood joint opened in 1933 by proprietor and saxophonist Lou Capozzoli's father, Ray, is a bit out of the ordinary.
NEWS
February 14, 1986 | By Beth Gillin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city's business, civic and political leaders transformed themselves into rock-and-roll animals yesterday in an attempt to woo the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Museum to Philadelphia. In an orchestrated performance that combined balloons and blueprints, raucous street-corner chants and polite boardroom persuasion, the city wined, dined, fawned over and rallied around representatives of the proposed national rock shrine. Gov. Thornburgh sent a telegram that said, "We're ready to rock around the clock in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Jennifer Childs, longtime artistic director for 1812 Productions, debuts Tuesday night in her self-penned, one-woman show I Will Not Go Gently at Plays & Players Theatre. Childs plays multiple roles in a musical tale of ageism, egoism, comebacks, and rock and roll. Three characters - a podcasting fan-mom, a faded television heroine, and a tech-centric tween - try to grab for glory they may or may not ever have had. These characters all bear some connection to Sierra Mist, an imaginary '70s/'80s female rocker icon whose music and image (Childs says)
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's fitting that Charlie Gracie's new album is called For the Love of Charlie. That's because the singer and guitarist didn't just leave his mark with late-1950s hits like the No. 1 smash "Butterfly," which made him the first rock-and-roll star to come out of Philadelphia. He also influenced many of the younger musicians who became the first generation of United Kingdom rock superstars - artists who still revere him. Van Morrison asked Gracie to open for him on a tour; Paul McCartney covered his hit "Fabulous"; Peter Noone of Herman's Hermits sings on the new album, as does Graham Nash, who also contributed liner notes.
LIVING
January 15, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob Dylan's motorcycle is parked behind the bar. The gold records, autographed pictures, satin jackets and rock-and-roll posters gleam beneath spotlights. Rita is here. And the shelves in the gift shop are stocked with colorful T-shirts ($16 and up) and sweatshirts ($22 and up). Nearly 27 years after two Yanks opened a hamburger joint in London, Hard Rock Cafe tomorrow morning brings its act to Philadelphia, where it has taken over a corner of the Reading Terminal Headhouse at 12th and Market Streets.
NEWS
March 26, 1986
I was insulted by Mark Randall's article on the Rock-and-Roll Hall of Fame ("Is rock-and-roll ready for a hall?" Op-ed Page, March 11). First he calls rock-and-roll trash and bad music, and then he claims that our generation spent the first half of our lives in adolescence. All this from a man who can only think of Fabian? Perhaps Mr. Randall is living the second half of his life under a rock. He was right about the trash situation, and his article helped to make it worse.
NEWS
April 15, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
As he approaches, the former N.W.A. member is still as cool as ice. As part of the legendary hip-hop group, Ice Cube burst onto the national scene in the early 1990s rapping about his unique perspective on life. Now, even though he's a big-time mainstream actor, he's still not shying away from controversy. As Cube has been making the rounds promoting Barbershop: The Next Cut , he has been holding forth on everything from former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's oft-repeated 1996 remark about "super predators," which he says is an offensive label, to America's current fascination with GOP front-runner Donald Trump.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Jennifer Childs, longtime artistic director for 1812 Productions, debuts Tuesday night in her self-penned, one-woman show I Will Not Go Gently at Plays & Players Theatre. Childs plays multiple roles in a musical tale of ageism, egoism, comebacks, and rock and roll. Three characters - a podcasting fan-mom, a faded television heroine, and a tech-centric tween - try to grab for glory they may or may not ever have had. These characters all bear some connection to Sierra Mist, an imaginary '70s/'80s female rocker icon whose music and image (Childs says)
NEWS
April 15, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
As he approaches, the former N.W.A. member is still as cool as ice. As part of the legendary hip-hop group, Ice Cube burst onto the national scene in the early 1990s rapping about his unique perspective on life. Now, even though he's a big-time mainstream actor, he's still not shying away from controversy. As Cube has been making the rounds promoting Barbershop: The Next Cut , he has been holding forth on everything from former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's oft-repeated 1996 remark about "super predators," which he says is an offensive label, to America's current fascination with GOP front-runner Donald Trump.
NEWS
February 4, 2016
By Paul Halpern In January, the world of music lost several giants known as much for their hit songwriting as for their multi-decade performance careers: David Bowie, Paul Kantner of Jefferson Airplane, and Glenn Frey of the Eagles. When luminaries pass away within weeks of each other, articles often appear attempting to find commonalities - sometimes real, other times contrived. In the case of Bowie and Kantner, there is indeed a deep cosmic connection. Both were avid readers who loved science fiction, popular science, and outer-space themes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2016 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Brian Fallon, the leader of beloved rockers the Gaslight Anthem, jokes that the solo tour that brings him to Wilmington's World Cafe Live at the Queen on Sunday is "a punishment thing. " He'll front a six-piece band, the Crowes, that includes guitarist Ian Perkins, Fallon's partner in the side project the Horrible Crowes, and Gaslight guitarist Alex Rosamilia. They'll debut songs from Painkillers , Fallon's first solo album, due in March. "The worst nightmare of every musician is to play new songs live, because people can't sing along, and they just stand there staring at you. So, we just figured, why not do a whole tour of that?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2015 | By Claire Sasko, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do you have a picture of Bruce Springsteen jamming in a New Jersey basement? Ever take a selfie with Elton John? It's time to visit your attic, dust off your old photo albums, and show the world how much you love rock-and-roll. The largest museum in the world wants to spotlight your snapshots. The Smithsonian Institution recently launched Rock 'n' Roll, a crowdsourced site that chronicles the rise of rowdy genre music through the lenses of concertgoers. The museum is accepting and publishing fans' photographs on rockandroll.si.edu and will accept submissions through Dec. 1, 2016.
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | Dan DeLuca, The Inquirer
Blame it on Keith Richards and the inexorable passage of time. Since the Rolling Stone's memoir Life became a million-selling sensation in 2010, book publishers have been keen to get music celebrities to bare their souls and tell lewd and licentious tales about their creative heydays. The outpouring of rock-and-roll memoirs spurred by Life , as well as Patti Smith's National Book Award-winning Just Kids (2010), is reaching critical mass. Artists of a younger vintage than the septuagenarian Stone have grown long enough in the tooth to look back, with a particular concentration by acts that came of age in the punk-New Wave-disco 1970s.
NEWS
July 12, 2015 | By David R. Stampone, For The Inquirer
Thursday's Mudhoney show at Union Transfer was a deeply satisfying event for discerning rock-and-roll lifers, whether young or old, part time or full time, in the crowd or on the stage. It was the Seattle quartet's first Philly show in a dozen years, and people were ready. Giddy kids with downy cheeks - clearly Mudhoney gig first-timers - joined in on every held-howl line sung by singer-guitarist Mark Arm during a dynamic band classic like "In 'n' Out of Grace. " So did certain oldsters who'd tracked that tune back in 1988 on WKDU (Philadelphia's bastion of free-form college radio)
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Sarah Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The entrance to what's promised to be Philadelphia's hottest music club come fall is a gravel lot under an I-95 overpass. Now, it's just an abandoned metal factory in Fishtown - windows long blown out, covered in graffiti. But by fall, developers promise, it will be home to the Fillmore, a 2,500-seat music hall that promoter Live Nation aims to fill with big-name talent, as well as the Foundry, a more intimate venue with room for 450 aimed at local bands and up-and-coming talent, and a lounge.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It wasn't Charlie Gracie's idea that he write his life story. The South Philadelphia native was one of the first stars of rock and roll, one who inspired numerous future superstars. But his life has contained not even a hint of the scandal and salaciousness that usually draw publishers to rock memoirs. "Why would you want to write about me?" the still-vibrant 78-year-old singer and guitarist says at the home in Drexel Hill he shares with his wife of 57 years, Joan. "I don't have anything spectacular outside of my music.
NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
NEW YORK - It was a big night in Brooklyn on Thursday at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony, as Philadelphia pop-soul duo Hall & Oates joined Nirvana, Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band, cartoon hard-rockers Kiss, and others in entering the Cleveland-based Hall as its 2014 class. Other inductees included '70s and '80s prog-rocker Peter Gabriel, singer-songwriter Cat Stevens, and country-rock hit maker Linda Ronstadt. She suffers from Parkinson's disease and did not attend the show but was paid tribute to in song by Bonnie Raitt, Emmylou Harris, Stevie Nicks, Sheryl Crow, and Carrie Underwood.
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