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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
The English rock band Echo and the Bunnymen will headline a show at the University of Pennsylvania's Irvine Auditorium tomorrow night. Echo and the Bunnymen recently released a new album, Songs to Learn and Sing (Sire), a collection of the group's best-known songs. The Liverpool band's most pervasive presence is that of lead singer Ian McCulloch, whose stentorian groan is an apt homage to the band's spiritual forebear, the late Jim Morrison of the Doors. The opening act tomorrow will be the Australian band the Church, whose gloomy music exerts a sort of sultry allure.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1997 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Is Half Japanese the greatest rock-and-roll band in the universe? Director Jeff Feuerzeig's feature debut makes a pretty cheeky case that two misfit brothers from Michigan - who bear more than a passing resemblance to cartoondom's Ren and Stimpy - just may be pop music's saviors. Equal parts infomercial for the band, parody of the rock-documentary formula, and loving tribute to the now Baltimore-based noise-makers, Half Japanese: The Band that Would Be King portrays Jad and David Fair as childlike geniuses who single-handedly re-created a moribund art form from the ground up. You be the judge.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
One of the most acclaimed young British rock bands, the Woodentops, will perform Sunday in Houston Hall at the University of Pennsylvania. The Woodentops' first American release, Giant (Columbia), features pretty melodies, murmured vocals and vigorously strummed acoustic guitars. In the old days, we called this "folk-rock. " These days, in the amnesiac pop world, it's the Next Big Thing From England. This, of course, is not the Woodentops' fault. At its best, this quintet takes familiar styles and makes them its own - this is the sound of hesitation and doubt, of romantic hemming and hawing, offered in a gentle, unassuming manner.
NEWS
July 19, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Add yet another claim to fame to Philadelphia's list. "This is Yes-town," Clifford Loeslin said yesterday. "Philadelphia is Yes-town. " Loeslin, a 29-year-old aerospace engineer, made the pilgrimage from his Seattle home to the Philadelphia area for the weekend-long Yescon - a celebration of the 19-year-old rock band Yes. Other fans trekked here to the acknowledged center of Yes culture from elsewhere on the West Coast and in the Midwest....
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Dan Gross
NOT EVERY band is praised by not only one, but both surviving members of Nirvana . Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl , the former Nirvana drummer, said on comedian Marc Maron 's WTF podcast that he loved Philly rockers Bleeding Rainbow . Ex-Nirvana bassist Krist Novoselic posted his appreciation last week. "We all really freaked out when we first saw the Krist Novoselic tweet about how he likes us," said Sarah Everton , who sings and plays bass and guitar in the band.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | By Pam Belluck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A rock band manager, building a pipe bomb to amuse himself as he hung out with friends on a slow night at an Exton service station, was killed early yesterday when the device exploded and blew a hole in his chest. Matthew Harvey, 28, of the Indian Run Village mobile home park in Honey Brook, was dead on arrival at Brandywine Hospital. West Whiteland police Lt. Ralph Burton said the incident occurred about 12:15 a.m. in the cashier's kiosk at the Exxon gas station at the intersection of Routes 30 and 100. He said that Harvey had been assembling the bomb by stuffing a section of metal pipe with sulfur scraped off match books and was screwing a top on the device when it went off. "There was just a small flash," said Brian Moore, manager of the 24-hour station.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1993 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
The last time Todd Rundgren came through town he brought along a veritable rock-and-roll orchestra. Monday at the Trocadero, the unpredictable Rundgren brought only himself - and a ton of equipment. He billed the show "TR-i" (for Todd Rundgren-interactive). But the restless innovator could just as easily have pegged it "the Return of Rock's Original One-Man Band. " From his stage (set up in the middle of the Troc dance floor) to his songs (from the new No World Order (Rhino/Forward)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2009 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Every Phoenix album has offered at least one, and usually two, perfect pop confections, starting with "If I Ever Feel Better" and "Too Young" from 2000's United. But America had not paid much attention until a Saturday Night Live appearance in the spring kick-started Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix, the French quartet's fourth album. Now they're playing sold-out theaters across the States. "Before this record we still felt like we were a secret society or something," says vocalist Thomas Mars from a tour bus somewhere between Salt Lake City and Omaha.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1990 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Why in blazes would a Bucks County family willingly open its doors to Slaughter? The hottest new hard-rock band of the year, Slaughter has earned a fast reputation as party-hearty animals who like to stay "up all night, sleep all day. " Or so go the lyrics to the MTV and radio smash from their nearly platinum (840,000 copies sold) debut album, "Stick It To Ya. " Another of Slaughter's bone-crunching anthems celebrates "burning bridges, running down, got a nasty reputation from town to town.
NEWS
July 31, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Max Bernstein had a band, the Actual, with a catchy song called "This Is the Worst Day of My Life," a slot on the Warped Tour, and a gig opening for heavy hitters Velvet Revolver on a national tour. What he lacked was a sense of purpose. "Somebody once asked me, 'Why are you in a band?' " says the Los Angeles singer and guitarist, who will bring his new Internet-distributed agit-rock outfit, Max & the Marginalized, to the Trocadero tomorrow and the Reef in Wilmington on Monday.
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NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, STAFF WRITER
Long before he was diner owner Luke Danes on Gilmore Girls - a role he reprises come November in the four-part Netflix reboot A Year in the Life - Scott Patterson was a kid from South Jersey with a passion for rock music. Of course, diners - like Ponzio's in Cherry Hill - were also a staple of his childhood. "Like most kids that pick up a guitar, I would sit there in my room and listen to Stones records and Jimi Hendrix records and try to play along with those guys," said Patterson, 57, who grew up in Haddonfield and went to rock shows at the Spectrum.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TV Critic
The last shows I expected to be comparing to Showtime's new Cameron Crowe series Roadies are The West Wing and The Newsroom . What could the road crew of a touring rock band have in common with White House aides and TV news producers? In real life, probably not much, beyond crazy hours, famous bosses, and ever-shifting crises. But there's something distinctly Aaron Sorkin-esque in the love affair Crowe is having with characters who professionally are at their best when the public forgets they're even there.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
Luke Wilson never worked the road for a rock band, but, after two decades of acting, the star of Showtime's Roadies knows how much crews matter. "I don't ever work on anything now where I don't know a crew person, or somebody [who has] worked with one of my brothers," Owen and Andrew, said Wilson during a Showtime cocktail party in January. "I was just saying to my mom that I do feel now like this really is my business. I work more with the same crew people than I do with the same actors.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
William Jesse Wolf, 60, of Lansdale, whose many interests were powered by a thirst for knowledge, died Friday, May 6, of pneumonia at home. "Billy," as Mr. Wolf was called, had lived with his sister Deborah since 1991. Before that, he lived in Germantown with his parents, William Jesse Wolf Sr. and Marcella Lyons Wolf. "He was my best friend," said his sister. "People just loved him. " Born with Down syndrome, Mr. Wolf regularly enchanted his family with his wisdom and sense of humor.
NEWS
January 20, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, STAFF MUSIC CRITIC
Glenn Frey, 67, the Detroit-born singer who co-fronted the Eagles, the archetypal and massively popular 1970s Southern California rock band, and with Don Henley made up one of the most commercially successful songwriting teams in rock history, has died. Mr. Frey, who sang many of the band's biggest hits, including "Peaceful Easy Feeling," "Already Gone," "New Kid in Town," and "Take It Easy" (which he cowrote with Jackson Browne), died Monday in New York City of complications from rheumatoid arthritis, acute ulcerative colitis, and pneumonia, according to the band's website.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
L7's tenure ended just as the Internet began to dominate culture. But it was the Internet that ended up reviving L7. The L.A. punk-metal band's run lasted from 1985 to 2001, influencing the riot grrrl bands of the early 1990s without reaching the same heights as their grunge (and often male) contemporaries. The reunited L7 plays the Trocadero Theatre on Friday night. Around 2013, when L7 singer and guitarist Donita Sparks started to post videos and pictures on L7's official Facebook page in an effort to digitize her archives, she wasn't thinking about a reunion.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
For all their success - a Grammy and several other big music awards; chart-topping Billboard music - Imagine Dragons, like Rodney Dangerfield, get little respect. The band has been called "lite" so many times that it's getting stupid. The "other Las Vegas rock band" (they're certainly not the Killers) has been called Radiohead-lite, U2-lite, and Coldplay-lite, the last being the worst insult because Coldplay itself is U2-lite. The quartet's big show at Wells Fargo Center on Saturday occasionally showed why Imagine Dragons is held in flippant contempt, along with many reasons to give them props.
NEWS
February 16, 2015
The Districts A Flourish and a Spoil (Fat Possum ***) The Districts grab your attention. The four members of the Philadelphia-based rock band formed in Lititz, Pa. - none of whom is legally old enough to drink alcohol - are a formidable live unit who make an immediate impression with dynamic scream-to-a-whisper song structures that take a page from the playbook of such 1990s bands as Nirvana and the Pixies. That furious energy, and the commanding, frayed-at-the-edges vocals of singer Rob Grote, are on display in A Flourish and a Spoil . It's the band's second full-length album and the first since signing with well-regarded indie label Fat Possum.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2014 | BY DEBORAH WOODELL, Daily News Staff Writer woodeld@phillynews.com
GREAT NEWS for vintage Korn fans - as well as fans of vintage Korn: When the band stops at Camden's Susquehanna Bank Center tonight in support of headliner Slipknot on the "Prepare for Hell Tour," expect a lot of the older songs from the catalog, said bass player Reggie Arvizu, known to fans as "Fieldy. " "On this leg, we're only doing two new songs from 'The Paradigm Shift,' " Fieldy said in a recent telephone interview, referring to the band's 11th studio album, released in late 2013, on Prospect Park Records.
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