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Rock Festival

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2004 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
The holidays are a time for giving and sharing, and for established rockers such as Good Charlotte and up-and-comers such as Northeast Philly's Silvertide to schlep from market to market for radio fetes, including Y100's annual Feastival, which played the winterized Tweeter Center on Thursday. With its '70s-arena-boogie bravado - think Stillwater from the rock flick Almost Famous - opener Silvertide was the square peg in this round hole of a bill, which featured fashion-conscious garage rock and contagious grooves from the Hives and Franz Ferdinand, respectively; earnest, power-chord-driven pop-punk (Jimmy Eat World)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1994 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
Nine bands, two stages, no waiting. So it didn't have the cutting-edge cachet of Lollapalooza or the familial air of the Philadelphia Folk Festival. And there was no attempt to create an era-defining experience a la Woodstock. But Sunday's HORDE (Horizons of Rock Developing Everywhere) Festival - a traveling gypsy caravan of jam-happy musicians and neo-hippy hucksters - featured full sets by Allman Brothers Band and Blues Traveler, and truncated sets by Big Head Todd and the Monsters, the Screaming Cheetah Wheelies, God Street Wine, Rusted Root and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2000 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
Contrary to media reports, Lollapalooza, Perry Farrell's moveable feast of outre music and ideas, didn't die. It was simply watered down and franchised to modern-rock radio stations, which each summer stage their own promotional mini-Paloozas with enough star power to draw sizable crowds. In exchange for their performances, the bands are guaranteed airplay. This was the business model for Y100's Feztival 2000, which went down all day and all night Wednesday at Camden's Waterfront Entertainment Centre.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | By B.G. Kelley
When is a Woodstock not a Woodstock? When it becomes a scheduled, media-savvy event complete with bus tour packages, as spontaneous as the Hoover Dam, as countercultural as a Fourth of July parade. That's what's happening. Woodstock, the most famous of the mega-rock festivals, happened 30 years ago - and a Woodstock '99 started yesterday. But it isn't Woodstock. Woodstock, 1969. David Fricke was there. Fresh out of Central High School, the Northeast Philly kid traveled with six friends in a VW van to Max Yasgur's cow pasture in Bethel, N.Y. There they found love, peace, rock and roll, stripping, skinny-dipping and drugs.
NEWS
June 28, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
This weekend's Paul Green School of Rock Music Festival is an ungainly beast. The five-stage, three-day extravaganza, which began last night at the Festival Pier, features more than 100 bands. Most of them you've never heard of, like Darwin's Time Machine (from Philadelphia), Clusterfunk (from Sand, Utah), and Steveadelic (from Downingtown). Some you may well have, like the raucous bar band Hold Steady and the New Wave heroes Devo, who top the bill tonight, or the ska-punk combo of Less Than Jake and Dropkick Murphys who headline tomorrow.
NEWS
November 28, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Never mind Philapalooza: Get ready for the Vineland Music Festival. Promoter C3 Presents, of Austin, Texas, announced yesterday that the three-day rock festival originally proposed for Philadelphia's Fairmount Park will instead be held Aug. 8 to 10 on a 550-acre farm in Vineland, in South Jersey's Cumberland County. Over three days, a crowd of 150,000 or more is expected at what C3 partner Charlie Jones called "a camping festival," similar to the Bonnaroo Music Festival held each June in Manchester, Tenn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Thirty-five years ago this month, the '60s counterculture threw a coming-out party, a three-day outdoor festival where thousands of long-haired music lovers tuned in and turned on to such now-legendary rock acts as Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane and Creedence Clearwater Revival. We're not talking about Woodstock, the mess that turned the New York State Thruway into a parking lot - and, mercifully, will not mark its 35th anniversary with another overhyped edition. We speak of the Atlantic City Pop Festival, a psychedelic stew of peace signs and music that happened two weeks before Woodstock at Atlantic City Race Track in Mays Landing, N.J., on Aug. 1-3, 1969.
NEWS
July 13, 1997 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The scene is growing familiar, like a favorite picnic ground, every rock given a fanciful name: Hedgehog, Pumpkin, Casper, Egg, Squid, Chimp, Yogi, Flat Top, Little Flat Top - there's even a Souffle. Which is all the more surprising because this patch of ground lies on the surface of Mars, that little red pinpoint of light 100 million miles away and easily lost among the stars. For now, earthlings aren't ready to hike through this alien world, with its salmon-pink sky, unbreathably thin air, and cold that can dip below minus 100 Fahrenheit.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
When it was first released in movie theaters, "Woodstock" was a thriller - a multidimensional, sensurround view of the landmark 1969 rock festival and counter-culture coming-of-age party. Justly hailed as one of the best documentary films of all time, this three-hour epic even won an Academy Award, and helped turn the music industry on its ear, ringing out the old and bringing in the new. In its original transfer to TV, "Woodstock" lost much of its punch. The innovative, multi-image style concocted by director Michael Wadleigh and editor/assistant director Martin Scorsese - lining up two or three images across the screen - was cropped or panned out of existence.
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
The place was a cramped and drafty high-school gymnasium, not the ornate House of Representatives chamber where he had spoken the night before - and where so many congressmen had risen to denounce him just one month earlier. When President Clinton looked out into the crowd, he didn't see the empty seats of Reps. Henry Hyde or Bob Barr, or the stony glare of House Majority Leader Dick Armey - but a throng of students who cheered his every gesture like he was a touring rock star rather than a middle-aged chief executive and policy wonk.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2013 | By Nicole Pensiero, For The Inquirer
Lisa Schwartz remembers a time not too long ago when folk music "wasn't considered particularly cool" - a development not lost on organizers of the annual Philadelphia Folk Festival. By the start of the last decade, younger music fans had stopped gravitating en masse to the venerable weekend-long event. But in recent years - with roots-rock bands like Mumford & Sons, the Lumineers, and the Avett Brothers wooing listeners in their 20s and 30s - " 'Trad' became 'rad,' " said Schwartz, president of the Philadelphia Folksong Society, which organizes the festival.
NEWS
June 28, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
This weekend's Paul Green School of Rock Music Festival is an ungainly beast. The five-stage, three-day extravaganza, which began last night at the Festival Pier, features more than 100 bands. Most of them you've never heard of, like Darwin's Time Machine (from Philadelphia), Clusterfunk (from Sand, Utah), and Steveadelic (from Downingtown). Some you may well have, like the raucous bar band Hold Steady and the New Wave heroes Devo, who top the bill tonight, or the ska-punk combo of Less Than Jake and Dropkick Murphys who headline tomorrow.
NEWS
November 28, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Never mind Philapalooza: Get ready for the Vineland Music Festival. Promoter C3 Presents, of Austin, Texas, announced yesterday that the three-day rock festival originally proposed for Philadelphia's Fairmount Park will instead be held Aug. 8 to 10 on a 550-acre farm in Vineland, in South Jersey's Cumberland County. Over three days, a crowd of 150,000 or more is expected at what C3 partner Charlie Jones called "a camping festival," similar to the Bonnaroo Music Festival held each June in Manchester, Tenn.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2004 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
The holidays are a time for giving and sharing, and for established rockers such as Good Charlotte and up-and-comers such as Northeast Philly's Silvertide to schlep from market to market for radio fetes, including Y100's annual Feastival, which played the winterized Tweeter Center on Thursday. With its '70s-arena-boogie bravado - think Stillwater from the rock flick Almost Famous - opener Silvertide was the square peg in this round hole of a bill, which featured fashion-conscious garage rock and contagious grooves from the Hives and Franz Ferdinand, respectively; earnest, power-chord-driven pop-punk (Jimmy Eat World)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Thirty-five years ago this month, the '60s counterculture threw a coming-out party, a three-day outdoor festival where thousands of long-haired music lovers tuned in and turned on to such now-legendary rock acts as Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane and Creedence Clearwater Revival. We're not talking about Woodstock, the mess that turned the New York State Thruway into a parking lot - and, mercifully, will not mark its 35th anniversary with another overhyped edition. We speak of the Atlantic City Pop Festival, a psychedelic stew of peace signs and music that happened two weeks before Woodstock at Atlantic City Race Track in Mays Landing, N.J., on Aug. 1-3, 1969.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2000 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
Contrary to media reports, Lollapalooza, Perry Farrell's moveable feast of outre music and ideas, didn't die. It was simply watered down and franchised to modern-rock radio stations, which each summer stage their own promotional mini-Paloozas with enough star power to draw sizable crowds. In exchange for their performances, the bands are guaranteed airplay. This was the business model for Y100's Feztival 2000, which went down all day and all night Wednesday at Camden's Waterfront Entertainment Centre.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | By B.G. Kelley
When is a Woodstock not a Woodstock? When it becomes a scheduled, media-savvy event complete with bus tour packages, as spontaneous as the Hoover Dam, as countercultural as a Fourth of July parade. That's what's happening. Woodstock, the most famous of the mega-rock festivals, happened 30 years ago - and a Woodstock '99 started yesterday. But it isn't Woodstock. Woodstock, 1969. David Fricke was there. Fresh out of Central High School, the Northeast Philly kid traveled with six friends in a VW van to Max Yasgur's cow pasture in Bethel, N.Y. There they found love, peace, rock and roll, stripping, skinny-dipping and drugs.
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
The place was a cramped and drafty high-school gymnasium, not the ornate House of Representatives chamber where he had spoken the night before - and where so many congressmen had risen to denounce him just one month earlier. When President Clinton looked out into the crowd, he didn't see the empty seats of Reps. Henry Hyde or Bob Barr, or the stony glare of House Majority Leader Dick Armey - but a throng of students who cheered his every gesture like he was a touring rock star rather than a middle-aged chief executive and policy wonk.
NEWS
July 13, 1997 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The scene is growing familiar, like a favorite picnic ground, every rock given a fanciful name: Hedgehog, Pumpkin, Casper, Egg, Squid, Chimp, Yogi, Flat Top, Little Flat Top - there's even a Souffle. Which is all the more surprising because this patch of ground lies on the surface of Mars, that little red pinpoint of light 100 million miles away and easily lost among the stars. For now, earthlings aren't ready to hike through this alien world, with its salmon-pink sky, unbreathably thin air, and cold that can dip below minus 100 Fahrenheit.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1996 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
There were no sideshows or tents offering tattoos. No poetry slams, virtual-reality rides or video dating. Still, Sunday's alternative-music festival - on two stages at Camden's Waterfront Entertainment Centre - outsold Lollapalooza, which played the same venue last year. "I was in the moshes and I didn't get killed. People were picking people up. It was great heart everywhere," said Christopher Corcoran, 22, of Philadelphia, adding that the $16 and $25 prices made the show a better deal than Lollapalooza.
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