CollectionsRock Garden
IN THE NEWS

Rock Garden

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 14, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fashionistas in the garden like those great big blooms with petals thick as petticoats, but there's another way to go: rock-garden plants. Their flowers are small, subtle, and every bit as beautiful as their hefty peers, as Ann Rosenberg of Bryn Mawr discovered around 1985. On a trip to England that year, she delighted in some small penstemons, which sparked an interest in other plants commonly used in rock gardens. "They're so cute!" she says. They're usually less than four inches tall, maybe as tall as 12 inches if you count things like dwarf conifers, another popular rock-garden feature.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paw prints, butterflies, roses, and soccer balls were painted on the rocks that lay in the dark earth Wednesday outside the Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office, reminders for the friends and family who had gathered to honor their loved ones lost to violent crimes. Mary Pasquale found out that her 12-year-old daughter, Autumn, had been killed when she turned on the news and a scrolling banner at the bottom of the screen said her body had been found in a recycling container. Jean Weaver and Debbie Schanz's daughter, Amy-Lynn Schanz, 15, was strangled in their home in 1991 by her ex-boyfriend, shortly after she had broken up with him. These women share the grief of losing their daughters.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
Jim and Cindy Poopert were surprised last month to see the yard of their back-door neighbors moving closer and closer to their own home. First, they say, they saw workmen clearing underbrush, tearing down tree limbs and carting off loads of leaves from a township-owned buffer between the two properties. Later, the Cherry Hill couple noticed crews turning part of the buffer into an extended back yard and putting down an elaborate rock garden. Jim Poopert said he was angry because his neighbors - radio personalities Ken and Elaine Garland - were destroying a part of the natural 90-foot buffer that separates the two homes and were using the township ground for their own lawn.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2011
OOOH, BABY, talk foliage to me. I like it variegated. Betula nigra "Heritage," your exfoliating bark turns me on. Call us prudes if you will, or frumpy old gardeners, but a good number of us here in Philly get our rocks off on rock-garden succulents and wanton perennial borders. Thousands of us turned out for the opening day of the Philadelphia International Flower Show yesterday to swoon over blooms like the passion-pink Miltonia and butter-yellow Paphiopedilum alba you see here.
NEWS
February 15, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
SHARON HISKEL, who has lived on her block of Marshall Street near Sedgely Avenue in North Philly since 1980, received a pear tree, a nectarine tree, and a red oak from her community organization, Nueva Esperanza, last year. She loves them. "The red oak is for shade," she said. "The other two trees will hopefully produce so I'll have fresh fruit. " Gabriella Gabriel Páez, education and community development manager at Nueva Esperanza, said that by participating in the Parks and Recreation Department's TreePhilly program since 2014, her organization has given away hundreds of trees to residents like Hiskel and witnessed the green rebirth of barren North Philly blocks.
NEWS
March 28, 1994 | by Linda Angeloff Sapienza, From the New York Times
Be careful what you wish for. You may get the half-acre lot where all of your gardening fantasies are meant to come true. How many apartment dwellers have dreamed of working the same magic outdoors that they do in small spaces, knowing they possess skills that far surpass the limitations of the windowsill and balcony? What a thrill to decide where to put a tree, or what to plant in the vegetable patch. Think of the satisfaction in gazing on an evolving color palette designed to keep flowers in bloom throughout the season.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Plant kale and zinnias as fillers. Whether caused by critters or seasonal change, you may have some empty patches in the garden. It's the perfect time to plant kale; it will tolerate cooler fall temperatures and be free from the cabbage worms that are known to munch on mature leaves up until early July. If you start more zinnia seeds now, the younger plants will be ready to replace the zinnias you planted in May that may eventually succumb to powdery mildew. If you don't have any seed or seedlings, then buy, beg or barter to get them.
NEWS
May 3, 1992 | By Jane Pepper, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Founded in 1852, the Klehm Nursery in South Barrington, Ill., has a long and distinguished history of producing a wide range of nursery stock. Here in the East, this family business is known for superior perennials, available to gardeners through its attractive catalogue. Roy Klehm, the fourth-generation owner, will speak May 14 at the Scott Arboretum at Swarthmore College and on May 16 at the Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill. Klehm's grandfather, Charles C. Klehm, began selecting and hybridizing peonies in the early 1900s.
LIVING
June 14, 2002 | By Marty Ross FOR THE INQUIRER
Dry streambeds can look as old as the hills, and they can turn tricky drainage problems into handsome elements in any garden design. Dry streams are really just above-ground drainage channels lined with rocks and placed to look as though nature had done the work herself. When it rains, water that would otherwise cut a muddy swath through a yard splashes along the stones in a streambed designed to handle the flow. When it's not raining, the dry streambed is a striking decorative feature, a rock garden around which plants naturally thrive.
NEWS
November 27, 2001 | By Lisa B. Samalonis
Cooking at my house sure isn't like on the Food Network. This thought occurs to me as I am attempting to cook tiger shrimp in a tomato, basil, and white-wine sauce over cappellini. While I stir in the angel-hair pasta, which has begun to stick together, my toddler is asking questions on a continuous loop with his volume control on loud; his 1-year-old brother is babbling something that sounds suspiciously like "BAM!" The dinner came out fine, although the shrimp were a tad tough, the sauce a bit thin.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 15, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
SHARON HISKEL, who has lived on her block of Marshall Street near Sedgely Avenue in North Philly since 1980, received a pear tree, a nectarine tree, and a red oak from her community organization, Nueva Esperanza, last year. She loves them. "The red oak is for shade," she said. "The other two trees will hopefully produce so I'll have fresh fruit. " Gabriella Gabriel Páez, education and community development manager at Nueva Esperanza, said that by participating in the Parks and Recreation Department's TreePhilly program since 2014, her organization has given away hundreds of trees to residents like Hiskel and witnessed the green rebirth of barren North Philly blocks.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Linda M. Fischer was 7 years old, her family moved from Brooklyn to Beacon, N.Y., a veritable wilderness in comparison, where they lived in a small cabin on two-thirds of an acre. Now 73, Fischer vividly remembers her father, after a long day at the hat factory, planting tulips and daffodils by flashlight. Her mother was queen of the rock garden. "I absorbed it all," says Fischer, a poet and retired teacher and editor, who took those lessons to heart to such an extent that she now can claim something most other gardeners cannot.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Plant kale and zinnias as fillers. Whether caused by critters or seasonal change, you may have some empty patches in the garden. It's the perfect time to plant kale; it will tolerate cooler fall temperatures and be free from the cabbage worms that are known to munch on mature leaves up until early July. If you start more zinnia seeds now, the younger plants will be ready to replace the zinnias you planted in May that may eventually succumb to powdery mildew. If you don't have any seed or seedlings, then buy, beg or barter to get them.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paw prints, butterflies, roses, and soccer balls were painted on the rocks that lay in the dark earth Wednesday outside the Gloucester County Prosecutor's Office, reminders for the friends and family who had gathered to honor their loved ones lost to violent crimes. Mary Pasquale found out that her 12-year-old daughter, Autumn, had been killed when she turned on the news and a scrolling banner at the bottom of the screen said her body had been found in a recycling container. Jean Weaver and Debbie Schanz's daughter, Amy-Lynn Schanz, 15, was strangled in their home in 1991 by her ex-boyfriend, shortly after she had broken up with him. These women share the grief of losing their daughters.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Rock clubs come. Rock clubs go. And memories of most of them are fleeting, gone in a haze of sex, drugs, and decibels. What, then, would anyone recall of a ratty Trenton punk venue called City Gardens that existed from the 1980s to the mid-'90s? Just about everything, if you ask Amy Yates Wuelfing and Steven DiLodovico, authors of a newly self-published oral history, No Slam Dancing, No Stage Diving, No Spikes . Or filmmaker Steve Tozzi, who has documented the eccentrically edgy haunt in Riot on the Dance Floor . Or the countless musicians and hangers-on who contributed recollections.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2012 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Give your to-do list one more glance. Are there any "last chance" projects you can handle before the deep freeze sets in? I was nagged all summer by one of my lavenders ( Lavandula x intermedia 'Fred Boutin'), which grew much larger than expected when I planted it a few years ago. It positively loomed over other plants in our rock garden. Rather than disturbing its second bloom, I waited until Hurricane Sandy's drenching rain made the ground perfect for digging. After I pruned a few low branches that were in the way, I dug six inches beyond the plant's three-foot diameter and the roots came up easily from the moist, sandy soil.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2011
OOOH, BABY, talk foliage to me. I like it variegated. Betula nigra "Heritage," your exfoliating bark turns me on. Call us prudes if you will, or frumpy old gardeners, but a good number of us here in Philly get our rocks off on rock-garden succulents and wanton perennial borders. Thousands of us turned out for the opening day of the Philadelphia International Flower Show yesterday to swoon over blooms like the passion-pink Miltonia and butter-yellow Paphiopedilum alba you see here.
NEWS
May 14, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fashionistas in the garden like those great big blooms with petals thick as petticoats, but there's another way to go: rock-garden plants. Their flowers are small, subtle, and every bit as beautiful as their hefty peers, as Ann Rosenberg of Bryn Mawr discovered around 1985. On a trip to England that year, she delighted in some small penstemons, which sparked an interest in other plants commonly used in rock gardens. "They're so cute!" she says. They're usually less than four inches tall, maybe as tall as 12 inches if you count things like dwarf conifers, another popular rock-garden feature.
LIVING
August 8, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Think of all the tough places people garden: on traffic islands and tree stumps, between pavers and logs, along highways and sand dunes. How about this: a rocky cliff 60 feet high and 120 feet long. Some rock garden! Mark Isaksen and Daniel Walth weren't sure what to expect in 2001 when they went to see the house for sale on Cliff Terrace, a one-block, dead-end street in Wyncote. Turns out, it had what they were looking for - less house and more yard than their place in Germantown - and two other pluses.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|