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NEWS
April 19, 2012 | Jon Takiff
HE WAS VOTED "Most likely to sell the Brooklyn Bridge" by his high-school classmates. But Dick Clark did much more than that. He sold America on a kit bag of rowdy trouble and seductive pleasures. And he did so fordecades —from those lurid "Great Balls of Fire" goosed by Jerry Lee Lewis and the hip, grinding come-ons to do "The Twist" evoked by Chubby Checker, to the coded drug-'n'-revolution messages he let fly on national TV from the Jefferson Airplane, and the totally tarty aura of Madonna that became America's obsession.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012
THEATER AGAIN AND AGAIN At the end of Eugene Ionesco's "The Bald Soprano," a one-hour absurdist comedy about the ridiculous nature of British social conventions and language, the play dictates that the actors start again from the beginning. The reliably-wacky Brat Productions - which staged a fantastically camped-out musical version of "Carrie" last year - takes that prompt literally. Beginning tonight, they'll perform the play for a full 24 hours, with the actors taking nary a break to catch their breath.
NEWS
August 28, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
SEOUL, South Korea - Kang Hyun-Min remembers the first time he slid an album from its cardboard jacket and delicately, almost reverently, placed it on the turntable. It was 1979, and Kang's father had ruled the record player off-limits to the 10-year-old. But home alone one day, the young Kang gave in to his curiosity; he flipped through his brother's album collection, thinking he might for once take control of that magical music player. Unable to read English, he knew musicians only by their album-cover art. He knew he had to hurry because someone could arrive home at any minute.
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Can the Grammys do anything right? This month, the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, responding to years of criticism that the Grammy Awards were hopelessly out of touch, decided to do something about it. Academy president Neil Portnow announced that instead of giving out 109 golden gramophones at next year's 54th annual awards, it would give out 78. The Grammys have been widely mocked - by this critic, among others - for being...
NEWS
July 9, 2010 | By CHUCK DARROW, darrowc@phillynews.com 215-313-3134
WHEN YOU look at what Chubby Checker has accomplished in his half-century as an entertainer, it's impossible not to be impressed. His recordings - including "The Twist," "Let's Twist Again," "The Fly," "Pony Time" and "The Limbo Rock" - have sold millions of copies worldwide and made him one of the most recognizable figures of the rock era. "Let's Twist Again" was the first recipient of a Best Rock 'n' Roll Recording Grammy (in 1962)....
NEWS
March 23, 2010 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"As soon as somebody said, 'Hey, do you want to play Joan Jett?' I said, 'Yes, definitely!' And then you realize afterward what a big job that is. " That's Kristen Stewart talking. And, as things turned out, that's Kristen Stewart playing Joan Jett in The Runaways: punked out in leather and a Jett-black shag in the just-released rock biopic about the '70s all-girl glam band. In the film, which opened Friday and neatly captures the head-spinning rush of being onstage thrashing your guitar when you're 17 years old, Stewart is the Wynnewood-born Ms. Jett and Dakota Fanning - another kid actor who has managed to segue into young-adult roles - is Cherie Currie, the blank-faced blond lead singer in the stripper couture.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2009 | By Nicole Pensiero FOR THE INQUIRER
The Broadway musical Spring Awakening did more than earn its composer, Duncan Sheik, several Tony Awards and the respect of Broadway theater-lovers and highbrow critics. The soft-spoken singer-songwriter - who burst onto the music scene more than a decade ago with the Grammy-nominated hit "Barely Breathing" - says Spring Awakening also afforded him freedom to launch the type of tour he's bringing to Philly fans this weekend: one that encompasses all aspects of his increasingly diverse career.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Tom Stoppard's Rock 'n' Roll is about political history and love and rock music and families and sex and death and passionately held ideologies; it's about cancer and Sappho's poetry and newspapers; it's about the differences between freedom and liberty, between the mind and the brain, between heretics and pagans. In other words, it's about all the important human stuff. As a minor character says, "We're supposed to know what's going on inside people. That's why it's the Ministry of the Interior.
NEWS
March 3, 2008 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Billy is passionate about rock music and he plays the guitar. Recently he was thrilled when a rock band invited him to its studio for a jam session. The members gave him some tips and then he joined them in playing a number. They surprised him with a gift of a brand-new guitar signed by band members. He was overjoyed because he had lost his guitar some time ago. An outgoing and sociable 16-year-old, Billy will talk to anyone who will listen. He has a good sense of humor and enjoys jokes.
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