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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1987 | By BRUCE BRITT, Special to the Daily News
What's brewing in Encino with the singing Jackson clan? Cola, namely "Jocola," a soft drink packaged by the Jackson patriarch, Joe Jackson. The drink comes in a distinctive red, blue and gold can that bears Joe's signature and the inscription: "Joe Jackson - father of the Jackson entertainment family and renowned entrepreneur - proudly brings you his signature soft drink 'Jocola. "' Rock 'n' roll is a tough business. Take former Jimi Hendrix sidekick Buddy Miles, for example.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1986 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
"We took a long, hard look at the cola landscape," Ken Ross, chief spokesman for Pepsi USA, tells me during the final tense hours of Tuesday's long pre-Grammy afternoon. Half the world is relieved to learn that Marcos is finally out. The other half nervously awaits the world premiere of the Don Johnson Pepsi commercial. "There are 20 different colas out there," Ross says forlornly. "It's awfully easy to get lost in the clutter of 20 different colas. " His mind drifts back to 1984, when Pepsi called upon Michael Jackson to lead them out of the cola wilderness.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1989 | By Kathy Sheehan, Daily News Staff Writer
In a stadium where Phillies fans once booed future Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt, Rolling Stones devotees merely chanted "What the f - - -! What the f - - -!" when the power went out during "Shattered," the third song last night. But the sound and lights were back on within minutes, the only apparent glitch in a spectacular 2 1/2-hour performance at the Vet, the first stop of the Stones' "Steel Wheels" tour of North America. A sold-out crowd of some 56,000 got "Satisfaction," a fireworks display, two giant, inflatable honky-tonk women and some old film clips from the world's best and oldest rock 'n' roll band performing on an elaborately lit stage.
NEWS
August 16, 1991 | by David Hinckley, New York Daily News
Nat King Cole has proven elusive to biographers in the past, but in "Unforgettable: The Life and Mystique of Nat King Cole" (St. Martins, $22.95), Leslie Gourse gets past many barriers to illuminate the dramas of his personal life. She talked with almost everyone around him, did not use this closeness to cover up the dark parts and, even more happily, found that in the end there was much sunshine. The book is titled after the song that sent its subject back to the top of the charts - a romantic ballad of enduring charm.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1989 | By David Hinckley, New York Daily News
Many are the myths about what happened in rock 'n' roll between Elvis Presley entering the Army (March 1958) and the Beatles playing "The Ed Sullivan Show" (February 1964). One lie, for instance, says no great music was created in those years. But this part of the story is true: There was a deliberate effort to replace the wild, uncontrolled, "dangerous" elements like Elvis, Chuck Berry, Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis with Fabian, Bobby Rydell, Jimmy Clanton and other clean-cut, controllable synthetic teen idols.
NEWS
September 6, 1996 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
AC/DC, ALLY BOYS. CoreStates Center, Broad Street and Pattison Avenue. Showtime: 8 tonight. Tickets: $24.50. Info: 215-336-2000. What's a man in his late 30s doing stomping around in knickers, feigning schoolboy temper tantrums? If he's Angus Young, the diminutive, steam-driven guitar powerhouse of AC/DC, he's doing quite nicely, thanks. Twenty years after their U.S. debut, his Australian-based, Scottish-rooted band is still cranking out top-of-the-class, bone-rattling rock 'n' roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Tom Stoppard's Rock 'n' Roll is about political history and love and rock music and families and sex and death and passionately held ideologies; it's about cancer and Sappho's poetry and newspapers; it's about the differences between freedom and liberty, between the mind and the brain, between heretics and pagans. In other words, it's about all the important human stuff. As a minor character says, "We're supposed to know what's going on inside people. That's why it's the Ministry of the Interior.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
Jazz authority Chris Albertson has pointed out that the Rolling Stones expropriated "Love in Vain" from a recording made 40 years earlier by blues artist Robert Johnson - "practically verbatim. " It was hardly the first time the Stones had dipped into the copious well of Mississippi blues and other freshets of Afro-American music for both material and inspiration. From the very beginning of their association, Mick Jagger, Brian Jones and Keith Richards had shamelessly co-opted the work of American rhythm-and-blues champions, Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley among them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2002 | By ALEX RICHMOND For the Daily News
Sad but true: Philadelphia is not known for its fine rock bands. But if Paul Green's work pays off, expect the Philly rock scene to change sometime soon - when his students are old enough to play in clubs. Green has taken being a guitar teacher to a new level: He's started his own school to teach young people the finer points of rock 'n' roll. Since 1997, the Paul Green Rock School has been a full-time job for Green. Of course, with a degree in philosophy from the University of Pennsylvania, what else could he do for a living?
NEWS
February 13, 1986 | BY ROBERT HAZARD
"I grew up in South Philadelphia, North Philadelphia and West Philadelphia. I call 16th and Dickinson home. All the great rock 'n' roll acts come from Philadelphia. "Bandstand" was the cornerstone of rock 'n' roll. Not only that, but the city has recently become one of the hottest rock 'n' roll cities in the country. More bands have been signed out of this town than any other . . . Philadelphia has more of a continuing history (of rock 'n' roll). It seems to blow through other towns . . . and all of the bands have to pass through New York, but they come from here.
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SPORTS
September 21, 2014 | The Inquirer Staff
Lawi Lalang of Kenya won the inaugural Rock 'n' Roll Philadelphia 5K on Saturday, edging Bernard Lagat by 2 seconds to win in 13 minutes, 29 seconds. The 23-year-old Lalang held off Lagat, 39, on the final uphill stretch, concluding at the front of the Art Museum. Lagat was aiming to break the American 5K road record of 13:24 set by Marc Davis in 1996. "That hill was tough," Lagat said. In the women's race, Amanda Stopa of Canton, N.Y., crossed first in 18:33. She finished 14 seconds ahead of Emily Moskowitz of Philadelphia.
SPORTS
September 14, 2014 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Just weeks before last year's Philadelphia Rock 'n' Roll Half marathon, Competitor Group, which owns the national Rock 'n' Roll series, pulled the plug on its elite support program. Gone were the stars of running, who have been a hallmark of the race since this event was the Philadelphia Distance Run. Then-CEO Scott Dickey said last year, "We've been paying appearance fees for athletes just to show up and use the race as a training mechanism. It's a disproportionate investment. " The backlash was huge and immediate, from the elites who lost their support, to fans of running who felt that Competitor had gobbled up a series of races that support runners (as they did in taking over the Philadelphia Distance Run)
SPORTS
September 17, 2013 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stanley Biwott raised his arms over his head and pointed his index fingers skyward as he crossed in front of the Art Museum. He finished the Rock 'n' Roll Philadelphia Half Marathon the same way he ran most of it: without a peer. The 27-year-old Kenyan easily defended his race title Sunday to earn the $3,500 top prize. Biwott finished the 13.1 miles in 59 minutes, 36 seconds, the second-fastest time in the race's 36-year history. Lyudmyla Kovalenko won a sprint finish to be the first woman across the line.
SPORTS
September 9, 2013 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
The Philadelphia Distance Run technically died in 2010, when it was turned into a Rock 'n' Roll half-marathon. But now any remains of what had been one of the greatest and fastest half-marathons in the world have been burned away thanks to a business decision by a private equity firm that just happens to be in the race business. Right before Labor Day weekend, the Competitor Group, which operates 38 Rock 'n' Roll races, told elite runners that they would stop paying appearance fees and travel costs, effective immediately.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
IF YOU are going to Friday's concert by The Who at Atlantic City's Boardwalk Hall, do yourself a favor and get their early enough to see show-opener Vintage Trouble, the youthful, Los Angeles-forged quartet supporting the legendary Brit rockers on their current U.S. tour. Although still flying under the radar here, the unit has made considerable noise in the United Kingdom by combining old-school R&B with an almost New Wave-y attitude, and having it all delivered by electrifying front- man Ty Taylor.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
JERRY GRANTLAND grew up in Lansdowne, enlisted in the Army right out of Cardinal O'Hara High School, deployed to Iraq in 2003 and was on reconnaissance patrol in an armored personnel carrier when a roadside bomb exploded. He wasn't wounded physically. But after eight months of hypervigilance in Iraq, always ready to run for cover from frequent mortar attacks, Grantland came home to a National Guard assignment in Texas, suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. "I was driving 75 miles-an-hour on I-10 when I saw a couple of guys at the side of the road who looked like they were duct-taping something to the guardrail," said Grantland, now 28 and living in Roxborough.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
ROCKIN' female radio DJs like Carol Miller have always been a rare breed. And almost extinct, some would argue, in today's age of YouTube and Spotify. Yet Miller counters in her breezy new autobiography, Up All Night: My Life and Times in Rock Radio , that broadcast FM is "the medium that just won't quit. " And this hearty survivor is certainly an apt case in point. Over the past four decades, Miller has charmed millions of rock-lovin' radio listeners - and been courted by several highly visible rock stars - thanks to that sultry smoky voice, uncommonly friendly and easygoing demeanor and deep musical knowledge.
SPORTS
September 15, 2012 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are many reasons more than 21,000 participants are competing in Sunday's Rock 'n' Roll Philadelphia Half Marathon. For Andy Aubin of Hatboro, it will be another step in a personal victory over the scale. For Malinda Ann Hill of Wynnewood, it's a way to raise money for a worthy cause. This is the 35th annual 13.1-mile race. The race will start and finish in Eakins Oval near the Art Museum, running through Center City past Independence Hall and along the Schuylkill. Start time is 8 a.m. The event was formerly known as the Philadelphia Distance Run before officially becoming part of the Rock 'n' Roll Marathon Series in 2010.
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