CollectionsRock Radio
IN THE NEWS

Rock Radio

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 27, 2006
SO THE jazz station is back on the air. I guess that's great for people who like that music, but at what cost? The cost of another rock station. There are eight stations that play jazz/R&B/rap, but we are left with just two rock stations (2 1/2 if you count 94.1 WYSP, since they talk half the day). When ever rock replaced with rap/R&B/jazz, nobody seems to care, but if the shoe is on the other foot, there are letters for more than a week. There must be a reason the jazz station was removed the first time.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
ROCKIN' female radio DJs like Carol Miller have always been a rare breed. And almost extinct, some would argue, in today's age of YouTube and Spotify. Yet Miller counters in her breezy new autobiography, Up All Night: My Life and Times in Rock Radio , that broadcast FM is "the medium that just won't quit. " And this hearty survivor is certainly an apt case in point. Over the past four decades, Miller has charmed millions of rock-lovin' radio listeners - and been courted by several highly visible rock stars - thanks to that sultry smoky voice, uncommonly friendly and easygoing demeanor and deep musical knowledge.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Since the late 1960s, George Clinton has been making a variation on rhythm- and-blues known as funk, music that de-emphasizes melody while focusing on rhythm and verbal repetition. James Brown records funk in its simplest, most elemental form; Clinton re-imagines this music at its most complex, and turns it into a vehicle for intricate wordplay and social commentary. Born in 1940, raised in Plainfield, N.J., Clinton has had his share of popular success. His vocal group, the Parliaments, recorded a classic rhythm- and-blues single in 1967, "(I Just Wanna)
NEWS
July 17, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Said Don Covay, author of Aretha Franklin's soul classic "Chain of Fools" and other hits: "I love the radio - every time they play one of my songs, I get some money. " This was one of the nice, air-clearingly honest remarks that popped up at the four-day New Music Seminar, which ended last night at New York's Marriott Marquis Hotel. Covay was on a panel of songwriters at this seventh annual conference, which has grown from a two-day get-together of a few hundred curious people to an all-out mob of more than 5,500 music-industry movers, shakers and mover/shaker wanna-bes.
NEWS
April 1, 1988 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
Have you been searching for the spiritual descendent of John Lennon or an heir to the empire of Pink Floyd's acid burnout, Syd Barrett? Look no further than Robyn Hitchcock, a surreal yet seductive image painter from Britain, who plays the Chestnut Cabaret on Monday with his snappy little combo, The Egyptians. Something of a state secret, Hitchcock's half-dozen albums with the Egyptians and prior efforts with the Soft Boys have never had much attention paid by the conservatives at album rock radio.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
AIN'T IT great when all the stars align? Denny Somach is feeling just such a magical, mystical moment as he and others aim to spread a "Whole Lotta Love" for one of the biggest rock bands of all times - Led Zeppelin - with a rash of new goodies, including a lavish book, CD and DVD sets, tribute concerts and even a major TV salute. Producer of the nationally syndicated "Get the Let Out" weekly and daily radio features, Somach has been on the bluesy Brit band's case since the early 1970s.
NEWS
October 27, 1993 | by Suzan Bibisi, Los Angeles Daily News
When Jancee Dunn was covering the MTV Music Video Awards for Rolling Stone in September, she asked all the rock artists whom they most wanted to meet. The responses surprised the 27-year-old associate editor. "All of them said, 'Tony Bennett,' " Dunn recalled of her backstage interviews. "No one else. It was Tony, Tony, Tony. "I thought, 'What's happening here?' " College students, rock radio listeners and rockers themselves are discovering that the 67-year-old crooner is not just for parents anymore.
NEWS
December 1, 1987 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Pop Music Writer
"Philadelphia rock radio has become a national joke," chortled music critic and publicist Toby Mamis recently. "How many oldies stations does one city need? Even Godforsaken Baltimore has a better radio situation. A new artist can't get arrested in Philly. What gives?" That's a question music fans have been asking since Nov. 3, when both WIOQ (102/FM) and WCAU (98/FM) dumped contemporary music for oldies. The loss of WIOQ is particularly profound, since it represented the last high-power signal for progressive rock - the only showcase for happening new acts like Suzanne Vega, Bruce Hornsby, Crowded House and Psychedelic Furs.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Market research. We expect it from the makers of dry beer. Or running shoes. Or microwave popcorn. But certainly not music. Denny Somach laughs when he hears that. He's in the middle of proving just how important market research is to the development of artists in the music business. Two years ago, Somach, whose Havertown production company has become a major supplier of nationally syndicated radio programming, launched Cinema Records, a small label devoted to "new-progressive" artists.
NEWS
July 13, 1988 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
In the heat of an otherwise ordinary summer afternoon, three blind black guys in T-shirts and jeans are standing in front of their Balwynne Park high- rise, harmonizing their heads off, practicing for tomorrow night's concert at Penn's Landing. The group is Sound & Soul. The song is "Stormy Weather" and the longer they sing, the more you realize that no one has ever sung "Stormy Weather" quite like this before. No one, no time, no how. Ray Williams, 25, the cheerfully chubby one in the center, starts it off with a few simple finger pops, nice and easy, laying in the rhythm from his drummer's heart.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
AIN'T IT great when all the stars align? Denny Somach is feeling just such a magical, mystical moment as he and others aim to spread a "Whole Lotta Love" for one of the biggest rock bands of all times - Led Zeppelin - with a rash of new goodies, including a lavish book, CD and DVD sets, tribute concerts and even a major TV salute. Producer of the nationally syndicated "Get the Let Out" weekly and daily radio features, Somach has been on the bluesy Brit band's case since the early 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
ROCKIN' female radio DJs like Carol Miller have always been a rare breed. And almost extinct, some would argue, in today's age of YouTube and Spotify. Yet Miller counters in her breezy new autobiography, Up All Night: My Life and Times in Rock Radio , that broadcast FM is "the medium that just won't quit. " And this hearty survivor is certainly an apt case in point. Over the past four decades, Miller has charmed millions of rock-lovin' radio listeners - and been courted by several highly visible rock stars - thanks to that sultry smoky voice, uncommonly friendly and easygoing demeanor and deep musical knowledge.
NEWS
November 27, 2006
SO THE jazz station is back on the air. I guess that's great for people who like that music, but at what cost? The cost of another rock station. There are eight stations that play jazz/R&B/rap, but we are left with just two rock stations (2 1/2 if you count 94.1 WYSP, since they talk half the day). When ever rock replaced with rap/R&B/jazz, nobody seems to care, but if the shoe is on the other foot, there are letters for more than a week. There must be a reason the jazz station was removed the first time.
NEWS
October 27, 1993 | by Suzan Bibisi, Los Angeles Daily News
When Jancee Dunn was covering the MTV Music Video Awards for Rolling Stone in September, she asked all the rock artists whom they most wanted to meet. The responses surprised the 27-year-old associate editor. "All of them said, 'Tony Bennett,' " Dunn recalled of her backstage interviews. "No one else. It was Tony, Tony, Tony. "I thought, 'What's happening here?' " College students, rock radio listeners and rockers themselves are discovering that the 67-year-old crooner is not just for parents anymore.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writers Gail Shister and Glen Macnow contributed to this article
After 23 years on WIP-AM (610), the Philadelphia Eagles yesterday flew off for a four-year deal with classic-rock station WYSP-FM (94.1). Not surprisingly, the move boiled down to money. "This (Eagles) season was unprofitable for us," Jack Williams, WIP's president, said in a prepared statement. ". . . The Eagles turned down what we felt was the best offer we could make. " No one involved would talk money figures past or present, but radio executives speculated that WYSP outbid all-sports WIP with an offer of about $1.5 million per season.
NEWS
February 10, 1991 | By Christopher Mumma, Special to The Inquirer
It may not be Mao's little red book, but when operators start talking about Digital Cable Radio, they sound like college students at a protest. Words such as revolution keep coming up. After all, cable operators are hoping this is the radio version of the cable TV revolution of the 1980s. Something of a curiosity a decade ago, cable is now estimated to be in 55 million of the 93 million television-watching households across the country. Now, cable subscribers in Camden and parts of Burlington County can add a converter box for the stereo to go with the familiar one on top of the television.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Market research. We expect it from the makers of dry beer. Or running shoes. Or microwave popcorn. But certainly not music. Denny Somach laughs when he hears that. He's in the middle of proving just how important market research is to the development of artists in the music business. Two years ago, Somach, whose Havertown production company has become a major supplier of nationally syndicated radio programming, launched Cinema Records, a small label devoted to "new-progressive" artists.
NEWS
July 15, 1988 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's official: Philadelphia has a new No. 1 radio station, urban- contemporary WUSL-FM (98.9), or Power 99 to its legion of young listeners. A bridesmaid in the ratings off and on for two years, Power 99 surged past rock giant WMMR-FM (93.3) in the all-important spring Arbitron quarterly- ratings book, released yesterday, to march past 'MMR to the altar for the first time in three years. The spring ratings also brought more interesting news: 'MMR's John DeBella has once again turned back a hard-charging challenge by WYSP-FM's (94.1)
NEWS
July 13, 1988 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
In the heat of an otherwise ordinary summer afternoon, three blind black guys in T-shirts and jeans are standing in front of their Balwynne Park high- rise, harmonizing their heads off, practicing for tomorrow night's concert at Penn's Landing. The group is Sound & Soul. The song is "Stormy Weather" and the longer they sing, the more you realize that no one has ever sung "Stormy Weather" quite like this before. No one, no time, no how. Ray Williams, 25, the cheerfully chubby one in the center, starts it off with a few simple finger pops, nice and easy, laying in the rhythm from his drummer's heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1988 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
Reba McEntire comes to the Civic Center Sunday for the second in what promises to be a series of country shows. McEntire may be country's best female singer, and if she doesn't exactly fit in the more progressive wing of young country performers, she has still managed to turn the heads of Nashville traditionalists with cosmopolitan country tunes such as "Whoever's in New England" and "What Am I Going to Do About You" Last October at New...
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|