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NEWS
June 28, 1987 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Democratic State Committee yesterday approved the censure of Sen. M. Joseph Rocks for supporting Republican Frank L. Rizzo in the race for mayor of Philadelphia. The unanimous vote was the first step toward removing Rocks from the committee, said state party Chairman Lawrence J. Yatch. The censure would take effect upon Yatch's determination that Rocks is publicly and openly supporting the Republican candidate. Once that determination is made, Yatch said, he is required to write a letter to Rocks asking him to cease his support of Rizzo, the former Democrat who is running against Mayor Goode, the Democratic incumbent.
NEWS
January 29, 1990 | By Joseph Grace, Daily News Staff Writer
Can Democrats overcome their penchant for self-destruction and unite to bury Republican state Sen. Joe Rocks once and for all? Call that the $15,000 question in the 4th Senatorial District. In a race already attracting statewide interest because of the abortion issue and because control of the Senate could be in the balance, Democrats smell blood for several reasons: Party registration. Rocks, twice elected as a Democrat, has never run as a Republican in the heavily Democratic district.
NEWS
August 3, 1990 | By Joseph Grace, Daily News Staff Writer
Republican state Sen. Joseph Rocks stood in front of a closed trash-burning plant in Roxborough Wednesday and painted himself as the environmentalist senator whose crusade led to the plant's shutdown in 1988. Yesterday, two non-partisan lawyers who worked on the plant's shutdown said Rocks played no role in the legal fight that actually closed the facility. The lawyers said, in effect, that Rocks was spreading political smog. "It was the community groups and PILCOP who did it," said Jerome Balter, a lawyer with the Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia (PILCOP)
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Summerdale Civic Association took time out this week from its battles over auto thefts, zoning, vandalism and vacant houses to honor two benefactors: City Councilman Jack Kelly and state Sen. M. Joseph Rocks. The two Republicans were honored by more than 90 members of the organization at a standing-room-only meeting Monday night at the Houseman Playground, Summerdale and Godfrey Avenues. Kelly was saluted for his work in helping the 18-month-old group organize and for providing staff assistance until the association could stand on its own and tackle neighborhood problems.
NEWS
November 10, 1996 | By Brian Thevenot, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bob Ucciferri, proprietor of Cherry Hill Stone, wants to capitalize on the "keep up with the Joneses" attitude among homeowners. Ucciferri sells rocks, mostly, to round out the gardens his customers are building to decorate their yards and, perhaps, to get one up on their neighbors. "This is a real trendy area," he said. "There are a load of landscapers here, and they are all busy. . . . "People have the attitude, 'If the Joneses over here get landscapers to cut their grass, well then, I better not be seen out there pushing a mower.
NEWS
November 23, 2007
YOU WANT PRETTY? Watch Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins go deep in the hole, snag the ball, pivot, and fire a perfect throw to Ryan Howard at first. So smooth, so effortless. You want sweet? Watch Rollins round the bases, a blur of speed and agility. You want excitement? You've got J-Roll. Jimmy Rollins this week was voted the National League's Most Valuable Player. It is a well-deserved honor, if we do say so ourselves. The little shortstop with the surprising home- run power was one of the players who made last season's team fun to root for. J-Roll is a throwback.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1994 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Pavement's "Cut Your Hair," a scalding commentary on fledgling rock bands from the current Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain, contains one verse that sounds like a classified ad: "No big hair/Chops a must/Songs mean a lot. " It's a bit of mockery, but Saturday at the sold-out Trocadero, the rising stars of independent-label rock made at least part of it ring true: The songs did mean a lot. There were few guitar solos, and fewer moments of musical...
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | By Anjetta McQueen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The a cappella group Sweet Honey in the Rock filled the Academy of Music last night with the sounds of struggle, endurance and hope straight from the womb of history. For 2 1/2 hours, five voices - a sixth member of the all-woman group is a signer for the deaf - ebbed and flowed from the ancient, beckoning African rhythms to the new-age melange of gospel, folk, blues, jazz, rap and reggae they are known for. Wrapped in flowing swaths of brilliant hues, Sweet Honey often surpassed its musical impact with its visual presence by echoing melodies with graceful hand gestures and dancing.
SPORTS
July 11, 1997 | by Tom Mahon, Daily News Sports Writer
John Bush, who won $1,000 in the Daily New Home Run Payoff contest, is a rocker in more ways than one. The 25-year-old Phoenixville man is a geologist who likes - what else? - rock music. He wasn't listening to the radio when Gregg Jefferies smacked the contest-winning homer that put the Phillies ahead, 5-2, in the sixth inning of last night's loss to the Florida Marlins. Instead, he was listening to the Foo Fighters at the Electric Factory. When he returned home and learned of his good fortune, Bush was truly stunned.
NEWS
January 11, 1988 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE and JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writers Daily News staff writers Kurt Heine and Joe O'Dowd also contributed to this report
A tremendous explosion, felt and heard as far away as South Jersey, ignited a five-alarm fire this morning at the Atlantic Oil refinery at Passyunk and Schuylkill avenues in South Philadelphia. One employee, Pete Sanduski, suffered facial cuts when he was struck by flying glass. Fire officials said the blast, which broke windows and rocked homes in several South Philadelphia neighborhoods, occurred at 9:21 a.m., blowing the top off a tank containing what a refinery spokesman described as "sour water" - various waste by-products used in the refining process.
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NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Much has happened to Billy Joel since his sell-out shows last summer at Citizens Bank Park, which was also Thursday night's venue. Once each month, in an amazing display of audience loyalty and personal dedication, Joel has been packing them in at Madison Square Garden. Then on Wednesday, at the age of 66, Billy became the father of a baby girl, Della Rose Joel, after recently having married (in April) his 33-year-old then-girlfriend Alexis. So there was much to celebrate on Thursday night, and Joel hit the CBP in kinetic, fired-up form from the start.
SPORTS
August 13, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHOENIX - Maikel Franco's promising rookie season hit a snag Tuesday night at Chase Field. The 22-year-old third baseman was forced from the Phillies' 13-1 loss in the first inning when he was hit on the left wrist by a fastball from Arizona Diamondbacks righthander Jeremy Hellickson. Franco was diagnosed with a contusion. X-rays on his wrist were negative, the Phillies said. It looked as if it could have been worse. After he was hit, Franco retreated to the grass behind the batter's box and fell to the ground, writhing in pain.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2015 | By Brion Shreffler, For The Inquirer
Walla Fest is a two-day art, music, and vendor festival that moved to Philly after four years at the Centre Theater in Norristown. Last weekend, it was at PhilaMOCA, a space still gleefully referred to as "the mausoleum. " On day two, Sunday, Norwegian Arms delivered folk-infused pop rock with echoes of acts such as Stornoway, Vampire Weekend, and the dream-pop of Philly band Grubby Little Hands. Norwegian Arms is the project of Sellersville-born Brendan Mulvihill, a.k.a. Keith Birthday, who moved to Brooklyn two years ago after a three-year stint in Philly.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2015 | By Elliott Sharp, For The Inquirer
Shania Twain delivered a thrilling, career-spanning concert when her Rock This Country tour stopped Wednesday at Wells Fargo Center. It was a bittersweet night for her fans, though, because they knew they'd never see the "Queen of Country Pop" wrap her fingers around a microphone, throw her hair back, look up to the heavens, and belt out the big hits - or any songs - on stage again. This was the last time. Ever. If we believe the announcement Twain made on Good Morning America earlier this year - and it's reasonable to be skeptical, since many artists retire, and then come back for one last cash-grabbing hurrah - this is the 49-year-old Canadian's final tour.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By David R. Stampone, For The Inquirer
Four swift clicks of the drumsticks and an urgent count-off of "1-2-3-4!" to commence another blistering live punk-rock tune - common enough. It's certainly been heard for decades in the band-practice rooms and house-party performance spaces of West Philadelphia. But in crisp, Castilian Spanish? Such was the case Tuesday, when Spain's superfast power trio Sudor (Sweat) blazed through a 20-minute set at Second Empire, providing a dizzying display of top-shelf modern Euro-punk. Sudor, of the Castilla-La Mancha region, is the second highly regarded Spanish hard-core trio this year to play the shifting West Philadelphia underground punk-plus circuit, following Barcelona's Suicidas, which played a memorable local gig in April.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
There is an inescapable survivor's mentality hanging over this year's Rockstar Energy Drink Mayhem Festival. The eighth annual touring heavy metal festival is noticeably diminished from past years, with three or four stages reduced to two. This year's headliners both recently emerged from difficult periods. Danish singer King Diamond, 59, underwent triple-bypass surgery in 2010 following several heart attacks, while Slayer has regrouped following the death of founding guitarist Jeff Hanneman and the firing of drummer Dave Lombardo.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Denis Leary sports a Daryl Hall haircut as Johnny Rock, an infamously indulgent, self-destructive leader of a fictional 1990s band called the Heathens in Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll . In addition to sporting the haircut, Leary also writes for the FX comedy, which premieres 10 p.m. Thursday. The best joke in the first few episodes of the erratic show comes at the expense of the Hall's Philadelphia pop-soul duo. "There's a ton of great long-term couples in the history of rock and whose sexual chemistry made the bands even better," argues Flash, Johnny's former Heathens songwriting partner, with whom he's now reunited.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2015 | Ellen Gray, Daily News
* SEX&DRUGS&ROCK&ROLL. 10 p.m. Thursday, FX. * THE JIM GAFFIGAN SHOW. 10 tonight, TV Land. * IMPASTOR. 10:30 tonight, TV Land. * TUT. 9 p.m. Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Spike. FOR SEVEN seasons of FX's "Rescue Me," Denis Leary played an alcoholic firefighter whom women inexplicably treated like a rock star. Tomorrow, he's back as a washed-up lead singer named Johnny Rock, in FX's "Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll. " Karma's come calling in the form of the 25-year-old daughter named Gigi (Elizbeth Gillies, "Victorious")
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2015 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the anthemic title song of his new album, Born on Fire , Ike Reilly is addressing a child. "Don't let nobody try to dampen your flame," he urges. " . . . Hold onto hope and desire, and take your flame to the streets. " "I really had a mission of trying to capture that idea of letting people evolve and find their potential without other people putting them in a box," the underappreciated rocker says over the phone from his home in Libertyville, Ill., outside Chicago, explaining how the song was inspired by his 17-year-old son. It's no stretch to say that Reilly has followed his own advice, however belatedly.
NEWS
July 14, 2015
YOU'D HAVE thought a rock star was in the ballroom, from the way female members of the NAACP had their camera phones out at the Loews Hotel yesterday. There was a star, actually. Only, Marilyn J. Mosby isn't your typical superstar. She's a big-city prosecutor who in May became an overnight sensation after announcing that Freddie Gray's death had been ruled a homicide and that charges had been filed against six officers in his death. A native of inner-city Baltimore, her bold and decisive actions quelled the street unrest that had dragged on for days in the Charm City, fueled by outrage over the death of Gray as well as those of other black males around the country - Michael Brown, Eric Garner and Tamir Rice.
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