CollectionsRocks
IN THE NEWS

Rocks

FEATURED ARTICLES
REAL_ESTATE
August 15, 2016 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
In 2003, George Funkhouser and Susan Nitka drove to Bridgeton, N.J., where George, who buys and sells precious metals and antiques, was going to meet with a client. At the time, the couple were living in Philadelphia's Port Richmond section in a home she had inherited from her parents. They had been together for a decade and were considering buying a larger house. That day in Bridgeton, they drove down streets lined with mansions built in the 19th century, when the city was a center for industry in South Jersey.
NEWS
June 28, 1987 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Democratic State Committee yesterday approved the censure of Sen. M. Joseph Rocks for supporting Republican Frank L. Rizzo in the race for mayor of Philadelphia. The unanimous vote was the first step toward removing Rocks from the committee, said state party Chairman Lawrence J. Yatch. The censure would take effect upon Yatch's determination that Rocks is publicly and openly supporting the Republican candidate. Once that determination is made, Yatch said, he is required to write a letter to Rocks asking him to cease his support of Rizzo, the former Democrat who is running against Mayor Goode, the Democratic incumbent.
NEWS
January 29, 1990 | By Joseph Grace, Daily News Staff Writer
Can Democrats overcome their penchant for self-destruction and unite to bury Republican state Sen. Joe Rocks once and for all? Call that the $15,000 question in the 4th Senatorial District. In a race already attracting statewide interest because of the abortion issue and because control of the Senate could be in the balance, Democrats smell blood for several reasons: Party registration. Rocks, twice elected as a Democrat, has never run as a Republican in the heavily Democratic district.
NEWS
August 3, 1990 | By Joseph Grace, Daily News Staff Writer
Republican state Sen. Joseph Rocks stood in front of a closed trash-burning plant in Roxborough Wednesday and painted himself as the environmentalist senator whose crusade led to the plant's shutdown in 1988. Yesterday, two non-partisan lawyers who worked on the plant's shutdown said Rocks played no role in the legal fight that actually closed the facility. The lawyers said, in effect, that Rocks was spreading political smog. "It was the community groups and PILCOP who did it," said Jerome Balter, a lawyer with the Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia (PILCOP)
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Summerdale Civic Association took time out this week from its battles over auto thefts, zoning, vandalism and vacant houses to honor two benefactors: City Councilman Jack Kelly and state Sen. M. Joseph Rocks. The two Republicans were honored by more than 90 members of the organization at a standing-room-only meeting Monday night at the Houseman Playground, Summerdale and Godfrey Avenues. Kelly was saluted for his work in helping the 18-month-old group organize and for providing staff assistance until the association could stand on its own and tackle neighborhood problems.
NEWS
November 10, 1996 | By Brian Thevenot, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bob Ucciferri, proprietor of Cherry Hill Stone, wants to capitalize on the "keep up with the Joneses" attitude among homeowners. Ucciferri sells rocks, mostly, to round out the gardens his customers are building to decorate their yards and, perhaps, to get one up on their neighbors. "This is a real trendy area," he said. "There are a load of landscapers here, and they are all busy. . . . "People have the attitude, 'If the Joneses over here get landscapers to cut their grass, well then, I better not be seen out there pushing a mower.
NEWS
November 23, 2007
YOU WANT PRETTY? Watch Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins go deep in the hole, snag the ball, pivot, and fire a perfect throw to Ryan Howard at first. So smooth, so effortless. You want sweet? Watch Rollins round the bases, a blur of speed and agility. You want excitement? You've got J-Roll. Jimmy Rollins this week was voted the National League's Most Valuable Player. It is a well-deserved honor, if we do say so ourselves. The little shortstop with the surprising home- run power was one of the players who made last season's team fun to root for. J-Roll is a throwback.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1994 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Pavement's "Cut Your Hair," a scalding commentary on fledgling rock bands from the current Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain, contains one verse that sounds like a classified ad: "No big hair/Chops a must/Songs mean a lot. " It's a bit of mockery, but Saturday at the sold-out Trocadero, the rising stars of independent-label rock made at least part of it ring true: The songs did mean a lot. There were few guitar solos, and fewer moments of musical...
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | By Anjetta McQueen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The a cappella group Sweet Honey in the Rock filled the Academy of Music last night with the sounds of struggle, endurance and hope straight from the womb of history. For 2 1/2 hours, five voices - a sixth member of the all-woman group is a signer for the deaf - ebbed and flowed from the ancient, beckoning African rhythms to the new-age melange of gospel, folk, blues, jazz, rap and reggae they are known for. Wrapped in flowing swaths of brilliant hues, Sweet Honey often surpassed its musical impact with its visual presence by echoing melodies with graceful hand gestures and dancing.
SPORTS
July 11, 1997 | by Tom Mahon, Daily News Sports Writer
John Bush, who won $1,000 in the Daily New Home Run Payoff contest, is a rocker in more ways than one. The 25-year-old Phoenixville man is a geologist who likes - what else? - rock music. He wasn't listening to the radio when Gregg Jefferies smacked the contest-winning homer that put the Phillies ahead, 5-2, in the sixth inning of last night's loss to the Florida Marlins. Instead, he was listening to the Foo Fighters at the Electric Factory. When he returned home and learned of his good fortune, Bush was truly stunned.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Bill Graham was a flamboyant showman who became the most famous music promoter in the world, a key figure in the 1960s San Francisco psychedelic scene known for hobnobbing with the luminaries he gathered for mammoth awareness-raising events like Live Aid , the star-studded 1985 Philadelphia concert for African-famine relief. Graham - whose Fillmore brand of clubs in San Francisco and New York has been replicated by Live Nation in venues all over the U.S., including the Fillmore that opened last year in Fishtown - even died like a rock star.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
IN THE cartoon classic, It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown , our trick-or-treating hero gets a rock (womp-womp) in his candy bag. It is not meant to be a treat. The late, great Freddie Mercury got a sort of a big rock yesterday for what would have been his 70th birthday and it was quite the treat. The celestial singer, who's now in the lap of the gods, and was once one of the princes of the universe, was honored by the International Astronomical Union's Minor Planet Center, which renamed Asteroid 17473 as Freddiemercury, according to brianmay.com, the website of the astrophysicist and Queen guitarist.
NEWS
September 5, 2016 | By Clark DeLeon
When I saw that the legendary surf guitarist Dick Dale was scheduled to perform at the Ardmore Music Hall on a Monday night two weeks ago, I thought of bucket lists - mine and his. I had never seen the pop-music pioneer called "the king of surf rock" and "the father of heavy metal" perform live, and I'm not as young as I used to be. I'm not even as young as Frankie Avalon was when he made a promise to Annette Funicello in Back to the Beach ...
BUSINESS
September 4, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
These days, we take it for granted that a big outdoor show such as this weekend's Made in America Festival or an arena spectacle such as Barbra Streisand's recent "The Music . . . The Mem'ries . . . The Magic" will land with lots of high-tech eye candy. Think huge video close-up of the artists visible a half a mile away, plus abstract art flashed on LED screens. And woe to the flimsy pop darling or the electronic dance music DJ if the video system crashes. The "excitement" would deflate faster than a popped party balloon.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
IT DOESN'T matter where you fall on the pay scale, women seem to get paid less than men. It's become such a commonly discussed issue, Secret is using a nervous young woman rehearsing her raise speech in a bathroom mirror . . . to sell deodorant. Even near the top of the wage food chain, with the movie stars of Hollywood, a town with progressive liberal views but standard business practices, the top actresses, according to Forbes, make considerably less than the top actors. Thanks, Forbes.
SPORTS
August 23, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
Vince Velasquez started a baseball game above single A for just the 35th time in his career on Sunday afternoon when he took the mound at Citizens Bank Park for an eventual 9-0 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals. His experience - or lack thereof - is showing. The righthander throws too many pitches, relies too much on his blazing fastball, does not pitch deep into games, and is still learning how to acquire outs by pitching to contact. But it is a team like the Phillies and their current rebuilding process that has the opportunity to allow Velasquez time to grow.
REAL_ESTATE
August 15, 2016 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
In 2003, George Funkhouser and Susan Nitka drove to Bridgeton, N.J., where George, who buys and sells precious metals and antiques, was going to meet with a client. At the time, the couple were living in Philadelphia's Port Richmond section in a home she had inherited from her parents. They had been together for a decade and were considering buying a larger house. That day in Bridgeton, they drove down streets lined with mansions built in the 19th century, when the city was a center for industry in South Jersey.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, STAFF WRITER
Long before he was diner owner Luke Danes on Gilmore Girls - a role he reprises come November in the four-part Netflix reboot A Year in the Life - Scott Patterson was a kid from South Jersey with a passion for rock music. Of course, diners - like Ponzio's in Cherry Hill - were also a staple of his childhood. "Like most kids that pick up a guitar, I would sit there in my room and listen to Stones records and Jimi Hendrix records and try to play along with those guys," said Patterson, 57, who grew up in Haddonfield and went to rock shows at the Spectrum.
NEWS
August 12, 2016
A THIN WALL separates warring rowhouse neighbors on a block of North Warnock Street in the Fern Rock section of the city. Two intelligent but belligerent retirees argue about almost everything, from when their war started to what the issues are. What they share? A feeling of dissatisfaction with the service they got from the oft-called 35th Police District, and that each is living in hell. When next-door neighbors are at war, a reset button is often impossible. One of the women, Deborah Young, is so angry about the neighbor - and with the police and the district attorney - that she's put up a large sign on her front lawn to complain.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
For most of the last decade, Livvie Forbes, 18, suffered from debilitating medical disorders that left her looking different than other children, and from attacks by school bullies that left her feeling hopeless. Her voice was silenced by sadness buried so deep within her that she was unaware it was her lifeline. Then, last year, she rediscovered it, reclaimed it, and recorded a demo. Members of the Hooters, the iconic Philly rock band, were so blown away that they offered to produce Forbes' first album for September release.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|