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Rocky Iii

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NEWS
January 15, 1990 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six weeks of filming gets under way here today on the much-awaited, much- ballyhooed Rocky V, purported to be the concluding chapter for Philadelphia's most famous export in years, fighter Rocky Balboa. But despite the hubbub about the movie and star Sylvester Stallone, a hush has fallen over the production company and city officials about the film's plot, the locations where they'll be filming and a host of other tidbits of trivia that would be fun for area residents to know. Here's what's known, or thought to be known, for the moment: THE PLOT.
NEWS
September 8, 2006 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nikol Bird, 33, will go to the dedication of the Rocky statue this evening by herself. She will stand anonymously among the expected throngs of Rocky fans at the Art Museum. But in her heart, she knows there would be no dedication today without her. The statue would likely have been long gone, probably cemented near some swimming pool in L.A. In 1981, as an 8-year-old living in Philadelphia's Lawncrest neighborhood, Nikol went door to door, gathering signatures to keep the 8-foot, 6-inch, 2,000-pound bronze statue of Rocky Balboa forever at the top of the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The city had refused to keep the prop for Rocky III in front of the world-class museum, and Stallone shipped the statue back to Los Angeles.
NEWS
May 16, 2003 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's the perfect Father's Day gift for the man who has everything: his own Rocky statue gracing the front of the house. But even Neiman Marcus might flinch at the price: $5 million. A new organization planning to open a sports library and research center in State College, Pa., says it'll "give away" one of the two remaining Rocky statues to the first person to donate $5 million. Harvey Abrams, president of the International Institute for Sport and Olympic History, said he'll buy the statues from artist A. Thomas Schomberg and give one to a donor and install the other at the museum.
NEWS
May 15, 2006
LOOKS AS IF the "Rocky" statue will soon return to the grounds of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Not at the top of the steps made famous when Rocky Balboa ran up them, but off to the side, where it won't offend the artsy-fartsy folks. (We sure wish those folk would loosen up. Take a jog through South Philly, gulp down a few raw eggs.) We'd argue that Sylvester Stallone's 1976 movie has brought more worldwide recognition to the museum - and its steps - than any Cezanne or Degas exhibition.
NEWS
February 1, 2012
THIS IS PROBABLY not what former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich needed right now. Rude Music Inc., which owns the rights to the Survivor song "Eye of the Tiger," sued Gingrich on Monday for blaring the song at campaign events, including a stop in Doylestown in September. The song, famous for its use in the film "Rocky III," can be found on the website Gingrich is using for his primary-election race for president, according to the federal suit filed in Illinois, where the music company is based.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | by Chris Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
THE REPUBLICANS ROAMING around the First Union Center this week have to peer over a concrete divider and through a chain-link fence for a 30-yard view of one of Philadelphia's most recognizable icons - the Rocky statue. This continuing disrespect for a movie prop that once sat atop the Art Museum steps gave man-about-town Harry Jay Katz and his new wife, Tracey, an idea they thought would thrill many visitors. Katz called the Daily News. We came this close to liberating Rocky for a little ride.
NEWS
September 6, 2006 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The champagne hasn't been poured yet - but the concrete has - in anticipation of approval today by the city's Art Commission to relocate the Rocky statue near the bottom of the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. City crews last week poured a cement foundation on the lawn, just north of the steps, where the 2,000-pound, 8-foot statue of Rocky Balboa will be placed if the vote is in favor. The mayor, the Fairmount Park Commission, and the Art Museum have all approved moving the 25-year-old bronze statue of Rocky Balboa - created as a prop for the movie Rocky III - to the new site.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | By Thomas Hine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rocky can't come back to the top of the Art Museum steps, not even for a visit. The big bronze lug can't move to the Visitors Center at 16th Street and JFK Boulevard, either. But he may find a home on Ninth Street, near the Italian Market. The Art Commission, which under the City Charter has the final say about the placement of art and other decorative and commemorative objects on public land, voted 4-3 yesterday to bar permanent placement of the Rocky statue anywhere on the Art Museum grounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1990 | By Ann Kolson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Yo, Rocky! Welcome home. After some bum business deals by his shady accountant, the dumb palooka from the neighborhood is back where he began. The big Main Line mansion is auctioned off, and Rocky's now living in a dingy rowhouse at 2822 Rosehill St. with his wife, the long-suffering Adrian; his sensitive son, Rocky Jr., and his boozy brother-in-law, Paulie. (The same house was Adrian and Paulie's in the original Rocky; the Italian Stallion then lived at 1818 Tusculum St.)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
I love the character too much to do a "Rocky IV" and have people go away disappointed and say we bled it dry. So this is it. - Sylvester Stallone, discussing Rocky III on Feb. 17, 1983. Rocky V concludes with Rocky Balboa scaling the Philadelphia Museum of Art steps for what is devoutly promised to be the last time - but as the above disclaimer indicates, take that with a grain of smelling salts. The climb leaves the Italian Stallion badly winded, but he musters the strength for a Sly aside.
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NEWS
February 1, 2012
THIS IS PROBABLY not what former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich needed right now. Rude Music Inc., which owns the rights to the Survivor song "Eye of the Tiger," sued Gingrich on Monday for blaring the song at campaign events, including a stop in Doylestown in September. The song, famous for its use in the film "Rocky III," can be found on the website Gingrich is using for his primary-election race for president, according to the federal suit filed in Illinois, where the music company is based.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Rocky Balboa, chewing his words like chunks of scrapple, is in reflective mode early in the sixth and promised final chapter of the Philadelphia pugilist's saga. The old Italian Stallion, long out to pasture, tells his pal Paulie, "I think there's still some stuff in the basement. " And he's not talking about plastic recyclables. Rocky Balboa, which Sylvester Stallone wrote, directs and stars in, comes 30 years and a few months after the Academy Award-winning best picture that made icons of both Stallone and his fictive Philly prizefighter.
NEWS
December 20, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Rocky Balboa, chewing his words like chunks of scrapple, is in reflective mode early in the sixth and promised final chapter of the Philadelphia pugilist's saga. The old Italian Stallion, long out to pasture, tells his pal Paulie, "I think there's still some stuff in the basement. " And he's not talking about plastic recyclables. Rocky Balboa, which Sylvester Stallone wrote, directs and stars in, comes 30 years and a few months after the Academy Award-winning best picture that made icons of both Stallone and his fictive Philly prizefighter.
NEWS
December 7, 2006 | By Rob Watson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayans are wary of Mel While many Mayans worked on Apocalypto, Mel Gibson's epic about their ancestors, and look forward to a movie in their native tongue, some are wary of Hollywood, the Associated Press reports. They know the film industry hasn't exactly been kind in its portrayal of Native Americans. "There has been a lot of concern among Mayan groups from Mexico, Guatemala and Belize, because we don't know what his treatment or take on this is going to be," said Amadeo Cool May of the advocacy group Mayaon (We Are Maya)
NEWS
September 9, 2006 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They came from all over the country for this. Jason Yun, 28, drove eight hours from Columbus, Ohio, and slept in his car. "I love Sly," Yun said. "He's my hero. He's inspired me to change my life. " Before he settled in at the barricade for the dedication of the Rocky statue last night outside the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Yun ran the Rocky steps. "I got a little teary-eyed," he confessed. So many just had to be here: a couple who got engaged on these steps, made famous by Sylvester Stallone in Rocky 30 years ago; a woman who named her son Rocco after the character; an aspiring actor who made watching all five Rocky movies a condition for his girlfriend to date him, although she's so beautiful he relented even though she'd only finished Rocky II. They came to join Stallone - who had all but given up, down to his last ounce of Rocky spirit - see a dream come true at last: the unveiling of a statue of Rocky Balboa on the grounds of the Art Museum.
NEWS
September 8, 2006 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nikol Bird, 33, will go to the dedication of the Rocky statue this evening by herself. She will stand anonymously among the expected throngs of Rocky fans at the Art Museum. But in her heart, she knows there would be no dedication today without her. The statue would likely have been long gone, probably cemented near some swimming pool in L.A. In 1981, as an 8-year-old living in Philadelphia's Lawncrest neighborhood, Nikol went door to door, gathering signatures to keep the 8-foot, 6-inch, 2,000-pound bronze statue of Rocky Balboa forever at the top of the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The city had refused to keep the prop for Rocky III in front of the world-class museum, and Stallone shipped the statue back to Los Angeles.
NEWS
September 7, 2006 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Apollo Creed couldn't keep Rocky down. Nor could Mr. T's menacing Clubber Lang. Not even the steroid-juiced Russian giant Ivan Drago could knock out Rocky Balboa. In that spirit, the 8-foot bronze statue of the fictional film character won another fight yesterday - over its own meaning and worth - when the city's Art Commission voted 6-2 to move the statue to a patch of lawn near the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Supporters maintained that the statue had stood the test of time and had become a beloved symbol of inspiration for Rocky fans.
NEWS
September 6, 2006 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The champagne hasn't been poured yet - but the concrete has - in anticipation of approval today by the city's Art Commission to relocate the Rocky statue near the bottom of the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. City crews last week poured a cement foundation on the lawn, just north of the steps, where the 2,000-pound, 8-foot statue of Rocky Balboa will be placed if the vote is in favor. The mayor, the Fairmount Park Commission, and the Art Museum have all approved moving the 25-year-old bronze statue of Rocky Balboa - created as a prop for the movie Rocky III - to the new site.
NEWS
August 17, 2006 | By PENNY BALKIN BACH
I WANT my Rocky back. As a cultural artifact and a tourist attraction, it should be returned to a site relating to sports or tourism, not held hostage in storage, where it has been for the past six months. It shouldn't be placed by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and I'll explain why. Referring to Rocky, the statue, as a movie prop is not an insult or an opinion, it is a fact. Rocky, the statue, continues to be used as a movie prop - moved around by Sylvester Stallone, most recently when he was filming "Rocky Balboa.
NEWS
May 15, 2006
LOOKS AS IF the "Rocky" statue will soon return to the grounds of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Not at the top of the steps made famous when Rocky Balboa ran up them, but off to the side, where it won't offend the artsy-fartsy folks. (We sure wish those folk would loosen up. Take a jog through South Philly, gulp down a few raw eggs.) We'd argue that Sylvester Stallone's 1976 movie has brought more worldwide recognition to the museum - and its steps - than any Cezanne or Degas exhibition.
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